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I Just Watched...

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12 hours ago, EricJ said:

Wes Craven's The Serpent & the Rainbow (1988) also pays more direct tribute to the cultural Haitian respect for zombies (while also skeptic-deconstructing it, from the original book source).

But yes, it's hard to realize that it wasn't until George Romero's "Dawn of the Dead" in 1978 that culture first popularized the idea that so-called "zombies" were caused by contagious toxic plagues--Anything dated before then usually had a Caribbean voodoo priest/ess in tow, unless it was one of the Italian B-epics about cursed Knights Templar.

(Back when William Castle's estate was trying to do cheap 90's remakes of "House on Haunted Hill", the current owner of RKO's properties wanted to do name-only remakes of Val Lewton titles, and was all set to remake "I Walked With a Zombie"...Until they apparently saw the movie, realized it wasn't those kind, and yes, the title was referring to A singular one.) 😂

I read The Serpent & the Rainbow and then saw the film. Appreciated the attempt at seriousness of the book, but didn't like the movie (not a Wes Craven fan). In any case, I will never eat a fugu fish. 

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59 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I read The Serpent & the Rainbow and then saw the film. Appreciated the attempt at seriousness of the book, but didn't like the movie (not a Wes Craven fan). In any case, I will never eat a fugu fish. 

I live about 1000 feet away from one of the filming locations of THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW, but I have never seen it.

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Something Evil (1972) - This dull effort features adequate TV-movie production values, and acceptable if unremarkable performances from its cast. Director Spielberg, following up on the previous year's Duel, doesn't display any of the skill evident in that. It's not bad, but it's not worth seeking out, either.    (5/10)

This is back when Spielberg was still being hired out for TV work at Universal because of his "unique camera angles" (which even he's embarrassed about today)--I tried watching this one time when I was looking up his early Universal TV episodes, and...I still have no idea what this movie was about.  I got past their removing the Pennsylvania Dutch charm symbols, and then, anyone else's guess is as good as mine.  😯

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15 hours ago, EricJ said:

[...]it's hard to realize that it wasn't until George Romero's "Dawn of the Dead" in 1978 that culture first popularized the idea that so-called "zombies" were caused by contagious toxic plagues--Anything dated before then usually had a Caribbean voodoo priest/ess in tow, unless it was one of the Italian B-epics about cursed Knights Templar.

 

To be a stickler, Night of the Living Dead predates Dawn of the Dead by a decade, so I would date it to then. Also, The Living Dead at Manchester Morgue aka Let Sleeping Corpses Lie was released in 1974 ('75 in the US), and is generally regarded as the first "Romero zombie" imitator (plus it's a good movie!). As for the 'cursed Knights Templar" films, I'm assuming you're referring to the Blind Dead films, which are Spanish, not Italian.

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Ghost Crazy aka Crazy Knights (1944) - Dopey horror/mystery comedy from Monogram Pictures and director William Beaudine. Billy Gilbert and Shemp Howard star as carnival performers Billy Gilbert and Shemp Howard. Shemp wears a gorilla costume while Billy tells stories. It's not exactly the finest stage act ever conceived. After their latest gig is up, Bill and Shemp run across a group of people headed for a "haunted house". These newcomers include chauffeur Maxie Rosenbloom, played by Maxie Rosenbloom. Billy, Shemp and Maxie run up against ghosts and another, real gorilla, as other, more intelligent, people attempt to solve the mystery of what's going on. Also featuring Tim Ryan, Jane Hazard, Minerva Urecal, John Hamilton, Tay Dunn, Bernard Sell, Betty Sinclair, I. Stanford Jolley, and Buster Brodie as Baldie.

There were literally dozens of these mystery comedies churned out in the 30's and 40's, and most of them are indistinguishable from one another. However, the oddity of this cast, and playing "themselves" no less, at least makes it unique. The jokes are dumb, the mystery inconsequential, and the pay-off nil. Another cinema "treasure" from producer Sam Katzman.   (4/10)

Source: YouTube

ghost-crazy1.jpg

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Jungle Woman (1944) - Sequel to 1943's Captive Wild Woman, from Universal Pictures and director Reginald Le Borg. Scientist Dr. Carl Fletcher (J. Carrol Naish) recovers the injured Paula (Acquanetta), the ape woman, following the events of the previous movie. He nurses her back to health and attempts to teach her to become more human (she talks this time around), but her animal nature comes to the fore once again. Also featuring Lois Collier, Richard David, Douglass Dumbrille, Samuel S. Hinds, Nana Bryant, Pierre Watkin, and cameos by Milburn Stone and Evelyn Ankers.

This movie has the same trouble as the first: not enough monkey business. It was interesting to see Naish as a good guy for a change, and even a good scientist character, an additional rarity.    (5/10)

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Bailout at 43,000 (1957)  John Payne, Karen Steele, Paul Kelly USAF is testing a sort of ejection seat that drops out of the bottom of the fuselage of a bomber. Watchable 6/10

Bailout at 43,000 Poster

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54 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Bailout at 43,000 (1957)  John Payne, Karen Steele, Paul Kelly USAF is testing a sort of ejection seat that drops out of the bottom of the fuselage of a bomber. Watchable 6/10

Bailout at 43,000 Poster

Did any of the pilots have a premature ejection?

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The Lady and the Monster (1944) - Science fiction/horror from Republic Pictures and director George Sherman. Dr. Patrick Corey (Richard Arlen) and Professor Franz Mueller (Erich von Stroheim) are conducting scientific experiments involving the preservation of life and the mind. When they get the chance to test out a new preservation process on the brain of dying millionaire Mr. Donovan, they take it. They manage to keep his brain alive in tank filled with liquids and electrodes, and soon the brain begins telepathically communicating with Dr. Corey, eventually taking over his mind completely as Donovan attempts to see to unfinished business. Also featuring Vera Ralston, Sidney Blackmer, Helen Vinson, Mary Nash, Janet Martin, William Henry, and Juanita Quigley as Mary Lou.

I don't think that I'd ever heard that 1953's Donovan's Brain was a remake, but here's the original. It has some nice ambiance thanks to good set work and some interesting lighting. Von Stroheim seems born to play megalomaniacal mad scientists, while leading man Arlen gets to stretch his limited acting chops in what is essentially a dual role. The film's biggest weakness is Czech ice skating champ Vera Ralston, making her lead acting debut. Her command of English was so poor at the time that she learned her lines phonetically, and she really seems to be struggling with her performance.    (6/10)

I love this completely misleading poster that makes it look like a vampire movie:

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Rogue's Gallery (1968) Director: Leonard J. Horn.  Stars Roger Smith (77 Sunset Strip), Greta Baldwin, Dennis Morgan, Edgar Bergen, Brian Donlevy, Farley Granger, Mala Powers, and Jackie Coogan. A Paramount Film

Image result for Rogues Gallery 1968 film Poster 

Murder mystery involving a private Hollywood club, with some Film Noir vets. 7/10 

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The Lodger (1944) - Another take on the fictionalized Jack the Ripper tale, from Fox and director John Brahm. Laird Cregar stars as the title character, a new renter of the attic room in a London boardinghouse run by Ellen Bonting (Sara Allgood). There's been a series of grisly murders attributed one "Jack the Ripper", and all of the boardinghouse residents gossip and converse on the topic, including beautiful actress Kitty Langley (Merle Oberon), who draws the eye of both the new lodger and Scotland Yard Inspector John Warwick (George Sanders). Also featuring Cedric Hardwicke, Aubrey Mather, Queenie Leonard, Doris Lloyd, David Clyde, Billy Bevan, Cyril Delevanti, Lumsden Hare, Skelton Knaggs, Kermit Maynard, C. Montague Shaw, and Helena Pickard.

Cregar is outstanding, with his bulky frame perfectly contrasted by his sensitive, even delicate speech and manner. The film is also handsomely produced, with excellent settings and costumes. It's always slightly depressing seeing how good Cregar was, and to mourn how short a life he had. His follow up to this, 1945's Hangover Square, was released shortly after his death of a heart attack at age 30.   (7/10)

Thelodger1944.jpg

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31 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Cregar is outstanding, with his bulky frame perfectly contrasted by his sensitive, even delicate speech and manner. The film is also handsomely produced, with excellent settings and costumes. It's always slightly depressing seeing how good Cregar was, and to mourn how short a life he had. His follow up to this, 1945's Hangover Square, was released shortly after his death of a heart attack at age 30.   (7/10)

Laird Cregar was a great actor. I love his character in I Wake Up Screaming (1941).

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The Brute Man (1946) - Exploitation horror from Universal/PRC and director Jean Yarbrough. Rondo Hatton stars as Hal Moffat, aka The Creeper, a monstrous figure who's on a killing spree, taking revenge on those he blames for his hideous disfigurement. His rampage is abated somewhat by his chance meeting of blind piano teacher Helen (Jane Adams), who doesn't fear him because of his appearance. Also featuring Tom Neal, Peter Whitney, Jan Wiley, Donald MacBride, Fred Coby, Janelle Johnson, Joseph Crehan, John Hamilton, and Tristram Coffin.

Universal produced this very minor effort, but for various reasons, including embarrassment for exploiting a man's terminal illness for horror effect, they sold the finished film to poverty row studio PRC. This was Hatton's final film, as his aggressive acromegaly finally took his life, and the already dubious entertainment value of this movie is rendered even sadder.    (4/10)

Source: YouTube

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Brute Man (1946) - Exploitation horror from Universal/PRC and director Jean Yarbrough. Rondo Hatton stars as Hal Moffat, aka The Creeper, a monstrous figure who's on a killing spree, taking revenge on those he blames for his hideous disfigurement.

 

I read that Hatton was voted the handsomest boy in his high school class: "He starred in track and football at Hillsborough High School and was voted Handsomest Boy in his class his senior year." -- Wikipedia

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1 hour ago, Spritz Nipper said:

Laird Cregar was a great actor. I love his character in I Wake Up Screaming (1941).

He's really great in Ernst Lubitsch's Heaven Can Wait with Don Ameche and Gene Tierney too! 

It's a shame he died so young.

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Crowhaven Farm (1970) - Made-for-TV horror from ABC, producer Aaron Spelling, and director Walter Grauman. Maggie Porter (Hope Lange) inherits a farm in rural Massachusetts, and she and her artist husband Ben (Paul Burke) decide to leave their home in Boston for the country life. Not long after arriving, Maggie begins to have strange visions and foreboding feelings that she can't explain. Things get even worse when the couple decide to adopt a young girl (Cindy Eilbacher) who may be more than meets the eye. Also featuring Lloyd Bochner, Patricia Barry, Cyril Delevanti, Milton Selzer, Virginia Gregg, John Carradine, and William Smith.

This TV movie chiller was a big hit, and has gone on to cult status among fans of the genre. I find many of these types of stories repetitive and uninspired, but this one is well-handled, with a decent script, good direction, and solid performances. One of the better TV fright films of the era, in my opinion.   (7/10)

Source: YouTube

Crowhaven+Farm+coven+-+Hope+Lange+and+Pa

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9 hours ago, Swithin said:

I read that Hatton was voted the handsomest boy in his high school class: "He starred in track and football at Hillsborough High School and was voted Handsomest Boy in his class his senior year." -- Wikipedia

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Rondo Hatton before he was struck down by the disease

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The Subterraneans (1960) Directed by Ranald MacDougall, Written by Robert Thom based on a Jack Kerouac novel. Stars Leslie Caron, George Peppard, Janice Rule, Roddy McDowall, Jim Hutton, and Arte Johnson cavort as a bunch of North Beach Beatniks in San Francisco. 

The Subterraneans Poster

Leo Percepied(Peppard) is a 28 year old writer living with his mother, with no friends. He thinks normal people are too shallow. He accidentally meets a group of beatniks who drag him to a subterranean bar. There he meets Mardou (Caron) a beautiful blonde French girl. Leo and Mardou fall in love with each other. They make love they fight, they break up. Leo has an affair with another beatchick. Mardou splits the scene. She re-appears with the news that she's pregnant and they leave the bohemian life. 

Apparently it didn't work out. Leo skips out of Frisco becomes a deadbeat dad, changes his name to Paul Varjak, pops up in New York City, gets picked up by a Sugar Mama who sets him up in a Brownstone where he starts writing again. There Leo/Paul falls for the $50 a trip to the "powder room" New York City call girl who lives downstairs with her cat.

6/10

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Crowhaven Farm (1970) - Made-for-TV horror from ABC, producer Aaron Spelling, and director Walter Grauman. Maggie Porter (Hope Lange) inherits a farm in rural Massachusetts, and she and her artist husband Ben (Paul Burke) decide to leave their home in Boston for the country life. Not long after arriving, Maggie begins to have strange visions and foreboding feelings that she can't explain. Things get even worse when the couple decide to adopt a young girl (Cindy Eilbacher) who may be more than meets the eye. Also featuring Lloyd Bochner, Patricia Barry, Cyril Delevanti, Milton Selzer, Virginia Gregg, John Carradine, and William Smith.

This TV movie chiller was a big hit, and has gone on to cult status among fans of the genre. I find many of these types of stories repetitive and uninspired, but this one is well-handled, with a decent script, good direction, and solid performances. One of the better TV fright films of the era, in my opinion.   (7/10)

Source: YouTube

Crowhaven+Farm+coven+-+Hope+Lange+and+Pa

I had been searching for a DVD of this for ages. I finally found a copy on Amazon, but even with the blue ray player, the film looks like somebody recorded it on a video camera from the TV. But it's definitely creepy and one of my favorites.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

The Subterraneans (1960) Directed by Ranald MacDougall, Written by Robert Thom based on a Jack Kerouac novel. Stars Leslie Caron, George Peppard, Janice Rule, Roddy McDowall, Jim Hutton, and Arte Johnson cavort as a bunch of North Beach Beatniks in San Francisco. 

The Subterraneans Poster

Leo Percepied(Peppard) is a 28 year old writer living with his mother, with no friends. He thinks normal people are too shallow. He accidentally meets a group of beatniks who drag him to a subterranean bar. There he meets Mardou (Caron) a beautiful blonde French girl. Leo and Mardou fall in love with each other. They make love they fight, they break up. Leo has an affair with another beatchick. Mardou splits the scene. She re-appears with the news that she's pregnant and they leave the bohemian life. 

Apparently it didn't work out. Leo skips out of Frisco becomes a deadbeat dad, changes his name to Paul Varjak, pops up in New York City, gets picked up by a Sugar Mama who sets him up in a Brownstone where he starts writing again. There Leo/Paul fall for the $50 a trip to the "powder room" New York City call girl who lives downstairs with her cat.

6/10

This sounds really AWFUL. I remember this being shown on network tv eons ago. Sorry now I didnt watch it!

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

This sounds really AWFUL. I remember this being shown on network tv eons ago. Sorry now I didnt watch it!

It wasn't on TCM. 

PM me 😎

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"Colette" - Wash Westmoreland - 2018 -

It's a wonderfully involving tale of the famous French author whose early works (the Claudine novels) were co-opted by her so-called husband -

Colette was a talented, but timid soul whose true identity wasn't evolved UNTIL she discovered and embraced her lesbianism - 

beautifully produced, directed and acted by Keira Knightley, Dominic West and Denise Gough as her lesbian lover -

colette-kira-knightly.jpg

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41 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

It wasn't on TCM. 

PM me 😎

I said NETWORK tv as in the big 3 back in the day.........

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32 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I said NETWORK tv as in the big 3 back in the day.........

I didn't realize you meant back in the day.

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The Catman of Paris (1946) - Period-piece horror thriller from Republic Pictures and director Lesley Selander. In 19th century Paris, a series of grisly murders are committed by a man described as being half cat. Promising new author Charles Regnier (Carl Esmond) comes to believe that he may be the Catman, distressing both he and his beloved, Marie (Lenore Aubert). Meanwhile, police Inspector Severen (Gerald Mohr) is determined to bring the Catman to justice. Also featuring Adele Mara, Douglass Dumbrille, Fritz Feld, Georges Renavent, Francis McDonald, Anthony Caruso, and John Dehner.

This obscurity isn't too awful if one goes in with lowered expectations. The cast is competent, and although there's a distinct lack of suspense, I found the history and mythology of the catman to be interesting. An uncredited Robert J. Wilke played the Catman whenever he's in full cat-face mode.   (6/10)

220px-The_Catman_of_Paris_poster.jpg

the-catman-of-paris-lenore-aubert-everet

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