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I Just Watched...

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"Manhattan Murder Mystery" - it was Allen and Keaton's reunion film - after Woody Allen had spent all those years working with Mia Farrow. 

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"The Grinch" - it's a magical Christmas film.

I fell in love with Cindy-Lou Who!

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ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (1975)

Starring: Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Will Sampson, Michael Berryman, Scatman Crothers, Danny DeVito, Peter Brocco. 

I watched this for the first time about a month ago, but I've been ruminating over the material trying to formulate a solid response. I read the novel, unprompted, back in junior year of high school, and have wanted to watch the movie, but never made time for it until now, I guess. 

Jack Nicholson plays R.P. McMurphy, an enigma of a man, who lands himself in a mental institution. He immediately clashes with the head nurse, Ratched, and his presence riles up the other patients. He constantly strives to gain the upper hand on Nurse Ratched, and she, him. The power struggle between these two is quite entertaining. Here Nurse Ratched is, doing her job, when along comes this strange man who immediately challenges her authority. Naturally, that proves to be quite the annoyance for her. 

I think Jack Nicholson did a great job with his character. He always manages to freak me out, regardless of the role he's playing. I don't know if that's talent, or if it's just his personality. 

It's my personal opinion that this movie is one of the more overrated ones, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. I managed to be entertained, but I also don't think I would add this to my Blu Ray collection. 

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Dialogue: 0.75/1 

Story: 0.75/1 

Acting: 1/1 

Music: 0/1 

Cinema/Camera Work: 0.25/1 

Enjoyment: 0.5/1 

Score: 3.25/6 

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1 hour ago, rayban said:

"The Grinch" - it's a magical Christmas film.

I fell in love with Cindy-Lou Who!

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She looks like the grand daughter of the head Keebler elf. :P

 

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Yesterday seemed to be both JOAN BLONDELL and GLENDA FARRELL day, so I tuned in to see THREE ON A MATCH which I never saw before and knew very little about.

I was busy with something elsewhere in the house, so I missed the opening credits, and so too, got some surprises....

I only knew Joan and WARREN WILLIAM were in the movie, but got pleasantly surprised along the way to discover BETTE DAVIS was there.  Along with ANN DVORAK.  Then LYLE TALBOT shows up, and later he gets terrorized by HUMPHREY BOGART, ALLAN JENKINS and EDWARD ARNOLD!  All in very early movie roles.

To me, it's always a treat to watch Joan Blondell in a movie(old or new), but BETTER when all those other favorites show up!  ;)  And too, not really all that bad of a flick, for the times that is...  ;)

And the later MISS PACIFIC FLEET was a fun romp too.

Sepiatone

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Yeah, I love it when they make a 30's star SOTM, because I could watch 30's programmers all day...

ALTHOUGH....

I caught THE LAW IN HER HANDS (1934) yesterday which was on at 6:00 pm (they seem to be starting GLENDA FARRELL'S movies early on her night) and IT SUCKED.

Glenda has a very small part, MARGARET LINDSAY has the lead and she is awful. So is LYLE TALBOT. So is the script and the direction and the dialogue and (most especially) the ending, which is like watching LEGALLY BLONDE had PHYLLIS SCHAEFLEY been brought in as a script doctor.

ps- i don't care if i spelled Phyllis's name wrong, she doesn't deserve to have it spelled right.

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13 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Lucille Ball used the tape and wig method as well.  I believe she started wearing the wig and tape around episode #3 of The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, "Lucy Hunts for Uranium," with guest star Fred MacMurray.  

In Lucy's case, she opted for the tape and wig because she was terrified of plastic surgery.  Unfortunately, with Lucy's (and Stanwyck's, Davis', etc.) smoking habit, her husky voice gave away her true age.  In I Love Lucy, Lucy affected the higher pitch for Lucy Ricardo's voice for many years.  Her voice steadily got deeper throughout the series as I imagine it was difficult to maintain the voice year in, year out.  Having seen a lot of Stanwyck and Davis' films, you can hear their voices gradually get deeper and deeper as their respective careers progress. Cigarettes seem to affect women's voices more so than they do men's. 

Yes, she started wearing wigs in the Lucy/Desi Comedy Hour and from then on in her series. I was in the supermarket last night and saw a new magazine about Lucy (one of those special issues) Did you get it?

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22 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Yeah, I love it when they make a 30's star SOTM, because I could watch 30's programmers all day...

ALTHOUGH....

I caught THE LAW IN HER HANDS (1934) yesterday which was on at 6:00 pm (they seem to be starting GLENDA FARRELL'S movies early on her night) and IT SUCKED.

Glenda has a very small part, MARGARET LINDSAY has the lead and she is awful. So is LYLE TALBOT. So is the script and the direction and the dialogue and (most especially) the ending, which is like watching LEGALLY BLONDE had PHYLLIS SCHAEFLEY been brought in as a script doctor.

ps- i don't care if i spelled Phyllis's name wrong, she doesn't deserve to have it spelled right.

LOL.

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17 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yes, she started wearing wigs in the Lucy/Desi Comedy Hour and from then on in her series. I was in the supermarket last night and saw a new magazine about Lucy (one of those special issues) Did you get it?

No I haven't.  I'll have to skim it and see if there are any pictures I haven't seen before or information I haven't read before.

While I can understand Lucy wanting to try to reduce the visible signs of aging with the wigs and tape, I always thought that that wig aged her 10 years overnight.  I do know that Lucy herself wasn't a big fan of the Lucy Ricardo bun that she wore throughout most of the series (there are only a few episodes where Lucy wears her hair down). Too bad there wasn't something Desi could have worn! He played Ricky Ricardo for 9 years, but aged like 20 over the course of both series! 

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Yeah, I skimmed through it. It was called Forever Lucy or something similar. It looked like it covered just the I Love Lucy show.

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21 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Unfortunately, with Lucy's (and Stanwyck's, Davis', etc.) smoking habit, her husky voice gave away her true age.  In I Love Lucy, Lucy affected the higher pitch for Lucy Ricardo's voice for many years.  Her voice steadily got deeper throughout the series as I imagine it was difficult to maintain the voice year in, year out.  Having seen a lot of Stanwyck and Davis' films, you can hear their voices gradually get deeper and deeper as their respective careers progress. Cigarettes seem to affect women's voices more so than they do men's. 

If you want to hear what cigarette smoking does to a woman's voice, listen to any of Joni Mitchell's early recordings and then look up "Sunny Sunday" on YouTube. Great song, but you can scarcely believe it's the same voice.

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17 hours ago, hamradio said:

She looks like the grand daughter of the head Keebler elf. :P

At least she's not the PC Lisa-Simpson from the Ron Howard/Jim Carrey movie.

My turn:

----

The Post (2017):

the-post-tom-hanks-movie-review-87b9291c

While catching up with recent movies via the Library, tried to get through this one out of curiosity, and ended up returning it halfway--If it gets better, tell me, but if this HAD been the "Spielberg remakes 'All the President's Men' for the press-embattled Trump era" epic he wanted to be, it probably would have been better than what we got.  Although Steven Spielberg, with Jeff Skoll's activist Participant Media bankrolling his projects, has been on a kick for sentimental "Great Progressive Moments in History" epics with Lincoln and Bridge of Spies, this has to be the least emotionally invested 00's-10's Spielberg epic since...oh, how far back do you want to go?--"The Terminal"?  (Even "Adventures of Tintin" had some Indiana Jones fun, and "Catch Me If You Can" played with its 60's-retro.) 

When a 10's Spielberg gets shut out at Oscar nominations, I immediately know something has to be wrong:  The story follows the drama at the Washington Post as the Pentagon Papers were activist-leaked, and Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee (not quite sure who/what he's trying to do with his artificially gravelly voice and padded pot-belly--He's not imitating Jason Robards, but he's doing a killer Lou Grant) wonders whether to break the rules when Nixon bars the NY Times from publishing.  Problem is, Liz Hannah's screenplay doesn't want that to be the main plot:  The story instead focuses on the glass-ceiling female-executive drama of whether owner Meryl Streep will hang on to her family ownership of the paper, in the face of new (old white male) investors...And boy, do Liz and Steve pile on the women-in-Hollywood-metaphor scenes of "Women's roles in the 70's".  (In a scene of Washington dinner parties, where the Washington wives all retire to the living room to gossip over fashion once "the men" start discussing politics, how loud will your palm hit your forehead?)  If I didn't know what movie Spielberg thought he was making, even worse, I think I DO.   😓

Literally the first half-hour of the story is devoted to Hanks and Streep grousing about why their reporters have been barred from covering Tricia Nixon's wedding, while staff go-fers discover...some big mysterious scoop happening at the NY Times!  I began to feel like that was the metaphor for this movie:  Could we go over to the NY Times office and spend two hours watching THAT story, please??  We get some nice Woodward-like scenes early on of the underground smuggling of the papers, and the ex-Vietnam activist who wanted to expose the truth...Only "great historian" Spielberg manages to make none of it involving--You'd think the director of "Saving Private Ryan" could make a brief Vietnam battle scene gripping, and the director of "Lincoln" could capture the national confusion and outrage when the public first discovered the "government had been lying to them", and give them some actual import to match the John Williams music.  With the focus on Streep's executive troubles, the movie wanted to cover "The business of the newspaper game", but with the hero-worship of "All the President's Men", the recent William Goldman obits just remind you how much better Goldman and Alan Pakula were at knowing where a real newspaper-movie story should be.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

At least she's not the PC Lisa-Simpson from the Ron Howard/Jim Carrey movie.

My turn:

----

The Post (2017):

the-post-tom-hanks-movie-review-87b9291c

While catching up with recent movies via the Library, tried to get through this one out of curiosity, and ended up returning it halfway--If it gets better, tell me, but if this HAD been the "Spielberg remakes 'All the President's Men' for the press-embattled Trump era" epic he wanted to be, it probably would have been better than what we got.  Although Steven Spielberg, with Jeff Skoll's activist Participant Media bankrolling his projects, has been on a kick for sentimental "Great Progressive Moments in History" epics with Lincoln and Bridge of Spies, this has to be the least emotionally invested 00's-10's Spielberg epic since...oh, how far back do you want to go?--"The Terminal"?  (Even "Adventures of Tintin" had some Indiana Jones fun, and "Catch Me If You Can" played with its 60's-retro.) 

When a 10's Spielberg gets shut out at Oscar nominations, I immediately know something has to be wrong:  The story follows the drama at the Washington Post as the Pentagon Papers were activist-leaked, and Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee (not quite sure who/what he's trying to do with his artificially gravelly voice and padded pot-belly--He's not imitating Jason Robards, but he's doing a killer Lou Grant) wonders whether to break the rules when Nixon bars the NY Times from publishing.  Problem is, Liz Hannah's screenplay doesn't want that to be the main plot:  The story instead focuses on the glass-ceiling female-executive drama of whether owner Meryl Streep will hang on to her family ownership of the paper, in the face of new (old white male) investors...And boy, do Liz and Steve pile on the women-in-Hollywood-metaphor scenes of "Women's roles in the 70's".  (In a scene of Washington dinner parties, where the Washington wives all retire to the living room to gossip over fashion once "the men" start discussing politics, how loud will your palm hit your forehead?)  If I didn't know what movie Spielberg thought he was making, even worse, I think I DO.   😓

Literally the first half-hour of the story is devoted to Hanks and Streep grousing about why their reporters have been barred from covering Tricia Nixon's wedding, while staff go-fers discover...some big mysterious scoop happening at the NY Times!  I began to feel like that was the metaphor for this movie:  Could we go over to the NY Times office and spend two hours watching THAT story, please??  We get some nice Woodward-like scenes early on of the underground smuggling of the papers, and the ex-Vietnam activist who wanted to expose the truth...Only "great historian" Spielberg manages to make none of it involving--You'd think the director of "Saving Private Ryan" could make a brief Vietnam battle scene gripping, and the director of "Lincoln" could capture the national confusion and outrage when the public first discovered the "government had been lying to them", and give them some actual import to match the John Williams music.  With the focus on Streep's executive troubles, the movie wanted to cover "The business of the newspaper game", but with the hero-worship of "All the President's Men", the recent William Goldman obits just remind you how much better Goldman and Alan Pakula were at knowing where a real newspaper-movie story should be.

Actually, it kept sliding. There was a period when it was a bit on the upswing, with Meryl getting a juicy scene or two, but then it flew off the rails with a downright embarrassing anti-climatic ending meant to show the beginning of the Watergate scandel, but with its closing shot of flashlights in the office in the dark, and thanks to Tom Hanks being in the cast, it ended up being more remeniscent of the famous Watergate joke in Forrest Gump. And the Watergate happed a whole year after what this movie was about, the Pentagon papers scandal, happened!

It was a numbing film, one that wasted true potential. 

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The Adventurous Blonde (1937). Torchy Blane does it again.  Glenda Farrell has a field day playing the savvy, sexy reporter.  The plot is convoluted but fun.  Rival reporters, tired of being scooped and embarrassed by Torchy, decide to fake a murder by recruiting a pompous actor to play the slain victim. Then they’ll trick Torchy into printing the false story, and finally turn the tables on her.  All this while Torchy is about to tie the knot with Steve MacBride (Barton MacLane), her policeman boyfriend. The only hitch is the murder ends up being real.  Torchy wouldn't abandon her wedding to solve the case, would she?  There's a funny line a rival reporter utters about whether people will believe the fake murder headline: "If it's in the paper it must be true".  And I thought about the saying regarding truth and the Internet. I’m glad TCM is showcasing Glenda Farrell as Star of the Month.  She’s a delight to watch.

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"Men Don't Leave" - Paul Brickman - 1990 -

starring Jessica Lange, Arliss Howard, Joan Cusack, Chris O'Donnell and Charlie Korsmo -

it's an unusual family drama (based on a French film) about a woman whose husband is killed in an on-job accident and then is forced to re-locate (losing everything) and re-define herself and her family -

although she is given a love interest (a professional musician), the film does not concentrate on her love life -

instead it concentrates on her new job (a difficult boss) and her problems with her two sons -

one falls under the sway of an older woman and another is corrupted (stealing) by a friend -

in a situation like this, survival is the main focus -

a sex life (for mom) is hardly the main concern -

the film is handled nicely by the four stars, especially Joan Cusack and Chris O'Donnell, who steal the film away from Jessica Lange -

that this woman does survive is a testament to her intelligence, strength and steeliness - 

release-date-feb-02-1990-movie-title-men

 

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Trick Baby (1972) Exceptional West Philly Neo Noir

Trick%2BBaby%2Bposter.jpg

You gotta ask yourself, at times, what the hell is going on here.

Not "here" in the present but in the rhetorical sense. What was responsible for the effect of a trend or say a tendency, which basically was to, back in the day, **** can a lot films into a sort of movie limbo. These are mostly non Hollywood films that came out after the demise of the Motion Picture Production Code. They were, maybe by the sheer volume of productions, all lumped together, the great and the mediocre, seemingly by caprice, into the various "exploitation genres" and not given any time to find much public appreciation or critical recognition. Grindhouse theaters predominately showed these particular films, and they were always considered by association, of poor quality or low (artistic) merit.

Add the fact that none of these films showed up uncut on major or local network TV in "premiers" close enough to the time they were actually in theaters to gather any type of a lasting cachet. They basically would be one run and done. Films between say roughly 1967 and 1980. By the 1980s, home video and cable movie channels were a means to screen and revisit some of these titles.

I cannot believe that Trick Baby hasn't found more acclaim. It's a great film, stand alone. It's a great Neo Noir and it's one of the best of the Blaxploitation films if you consider it as being such. It's story is a nice twist on a scenario that has been done before.  It has excellent cinematography that captures the West Philadelphia ghetto in an invaluable time capsule. It's cast of mostly unknown actors are all quite believable, not burlesqued, and treated quite seriously.

It's a film about a couple of con artists. It's right up there with some of more serious, non comedy con artist films. My personal favorites are, The Good The Bad And The UglyPaper MoonThe StingConfidence Girl, and Skin GameTrick Baby is closest to Skin Game in that we have a Black actor and a White actor playing the con men, but Trick Baby puts a twist on that.

Mel Stewart is the black actor of the team. Mel, played the part of the elevator operator who has dialogs with both  Robert Ryan and Harry Belafonte in the last of the Classic Studio Noirs, Odds Against Tomorrow. Stewart plays the seasoned old school con man "Blue" Howard. Kiel Martin (probably best known as a regular on Hill Street Blues TV Series (1981–1987)) is a white actor who plays "White Folks" a black man who can pass for white. White Folk's mother, a black woman, was an old friend of Blue. Blue took him underwing and taught him the art of the con.

The two have teamed up in the West Philly ghetto, and operate non discrimination con games against the stupid. whether white, black, sinner, saved, even a cop.

Trick Baby's director was Larry Yurst. Larry was Philadelphia born and grew up in the suburbs of New York and Chicago. He was given a Super 8 camera when he was a teenager, graduated in theater from Stanford University and worked in television until he was able to start making his own films. He lives in Los Angeles where he is now an accomplished photographer. "I always keep a tight rein on the art direction for my films and personally scout to find the locations I need." He only has a few full length films to his credit, too bad, he showed a lot of potential.

The film was based on the book of the same name by Iceberg Slim (aka Robert Beck (born Robert Lee Maupin or Robert Moppins, Jr). He was a pimp who became an influential author in the black community. Born in Chicago he moved around with his family to Milwaukee,and Rockford before settling back in Chi town. After his old man split his mama ran a beauty salon. She made enough money to send him to Tuskegee University. He was still a punk though, and got kicked out for bootlegging. Back home again, he started pimping claiming in his biography to, over his 24 year career, have run a stable of over 400 women black and white on the streets. He got busted in 1961, and served 10 months of solitary confinement in a Cook County jail. In jail he decided he was too old for the streets. He drifted to Los Angeles married Betty and became an insecticide salesman.

Betty encouraged him to write the story of his life as a novel. Pimp was published in 1967. It was the first insider look into the world of black pimps. Trick Baby was his second published novel.

The supporting actors in the cast are all excellent. Of note Dallas Edward Hayes appeared in (Across 110th Street (1972), Eyes of Laura Mars (1978)), Vernee Watson first film was Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970) and she is still active to this day, Don Fellows was in The Detective (1968), and Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981).

The excellent cinematography was by Isidore Mankofsky, the only other film I saw of his was Somewhere in Time (1980), too bad he didn't do more similar films.

A must see Neo Noir 8/10. Full review with some screen caps here Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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On 11/20/2018 at 9:15 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Yeah, I love it when they make a 30's star SOTM, because I could watch 30's programmers all day...

ALTHOUGH....

I caught THE LAW IN HER HANDS (1934) yesterday which was on at 6:00 pm (they seem to be starting GLENDA FARRELL'S movies early on her night) and IT SUCKED.

Glenda has a very small part, MARGARET LINDSAY has the lead and she is awful. So is LYLE TALBOT. So is the script and the direction and the dialogue and (most especially) the ending, which is like watching LEGALLY BLONDE had PHYLLIS SCHAEFLEY been brought in as a script doctor.

ps- i don't care if i spelled Phyllis's name wrong, she doesn't deserve to have it spelled right.

Lorna, I actually remember liking this one although I thought the message was old fashioned. Now I am going to fire up the DVR and rewatch it given your opinion. Keep on doing what you do. Nobody writes a review piece with quite the flair that you do! And Happy Thanksgiving!

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Many Happy Returns (1934)--Gracie Allen at her zaniest as the daughter of a department store owner, who (when pop's out of town) makes plans to tear down the store and build an aviary (she's already stocking the birds).  Luckily, that idea gets shut down, but what really angers dad is daughter Joan Marsh's plan to be...gasp...a Hollywood actress.  Dad (George Barbier) offers to pay dependable, albeit mercenary, manager George Burns to marry Gracie, but Burns won't agree until Barbier offers him $10/mile for every mile he can take Gracie away on a honeymoon.  Burns figures he'll make 30 grand taking her to LA, so off they go...on the same train as sister Marsh and her beau, a very young Ray Milland.  A studio is promoting Marsh as 'The Mystery Girl' and Milland as 'The Masked Tenor', but of course, things go awry, and Gracie and George end up playing those roles.  There are several music/dancing numbers sprinkled throughout--look for Guy Lombardo and Duke Ellington, so in parts, if feels like a musical revue.  The plot's a little jumpy, but a must for Gracie Allen fans and those who like pure silliness.  here's the link to watch on rarefilmm.com  http://rarefilmm.com/2018/11/many-happy-returns-1934/

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Thanks for the info, since I AM a huge Gracie fan, but---

Did you see this on TCM?  and if not, do you know if the channel has it scheduled?  I'm not one to bother watching movies or TV shows on my PC( I barely make it through short music clips), so maybe I'll see if a DVD is available.  I'm sure, since my GAL's in it, I should like it just fine.  ;)

Sepiatone

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Traveling Saleslady (1935) 7/10

This film is a breath of fresh air among the usually constrained unfunny comedies of the early production code era. Angela Twitchell (Joan Blondell) is the only child and go-getter daughter of toothpaste tycoon Rufus Twitchell (Grant Mitchell). The problem is, Mr. Twitchell won't let Angela go get anything. He has prehistoric ideas about women being too emotionally unstable and just not smart enough to be involved in business of any kind.

Angela meets up with an ex-bootlegger who has discovered how to get the flavor of his various bootleg formulas into toothpaste, but has been futile at his efforts to get Mr. Twitchell to talk to him - Elmer, played by Hugh Herbert. So Angela decides to get back at dad and take Elmer to dad's competitor. She tells the competitor that she will "lease" Elmer's formulas and labor to him for one year, providing she is allowed to be on the sales staff and get a percentage of her sales as income. The competitor agrees.

So Angela is out on the road, in competition with Pat O'Connor (William Gargan), representing Twitchell, who seemed like a big sleaze bag to me at first. For example, Angela gets no consideration from the first sales call she makes, which is on Glenda Farrell playing Claudette, a buyer. O'Connor is leading Claudette on and thus Claudette only deals in Twitchell products. O'Connor is there when Angela strikes out, and is condescending and arrogant to her, amused by the idea of a saleslady. But he is not amused for very long. The rest of the picture is basically a battle of wits between Angela as a figurative Bugs Bunny and O'Connor as a figurative Daffy Duck. And we all know how cartoons go that have those two in them. It is a rare feminist situation in 1935 American films, compounded by the fact that O'Connor does not know Angela's true identity.

Hugh Herbert is portioned out in small doses, and that makes him work in this film as too much of his typical confused and inane act can get old fast. The double entendres don't come fast and furious as they would have in the precode era, but a few do get through if you listen carefully enough. Even our two feminist characters in this film show a bit of prejudice. Before their first meeting - Angela as saleslady and Claudette as the head of buying for her drugstore - both women assume the other is a man and are putting on their face assuming that will help them with the man they are assuming they will be dealing with.

And who can't help like a film that shows the sales routes of the two rival toothpaste salespersons as lines of toothpaste meandering across a map of the U.S? Highly recommended.

Source: TCM

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The Woman in Green (1945)

tumblr_necy1e7RLQ1t1g01wo1_1280.png

One of the last of Universal's Sherlock Holmes Bs, this item has the Baker Street sleuth involved in a series of grisly finger murders, in which a digit is surgically removed from the hand of a number of women found murdered in the streets of London. Is it the act of a fiend or is there some kind of method to the madness?

Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce play Holmes and Watson for the third last time in this outing, which I think is the last of the series with a few memorable moments. A superbly understated Henry Daniell appears as Professor Moriarty, the third actor in the Holmes series to play the role (the others being George Zucco and Lionel Atwill). Rathbone would later write that he regarded Daniell as the best of the Moriartys.

Also memorably cast in the film is Hillary Brooke as a hypnotist involved with Moriarty in the case. Brooke's icy regal beauty and sophistication are perfect for the part. Highlight of the film comes at its climax when Holmes allows himself to be hypnotized by Brooke, placing himself in peril in the process, of course.

SPOILER ALERT: One of my favourite moments in the film occurs at the end. After one character has fallen to his death and Watson comments upon what a horrible way it was to die, a coldly impassive Holmes quickly responds, "Better than he deserved."

The Woman in Green is a B, to be sure, with its limited budget particularly apparent in a clearly painted city landscape in one major scene. However director Roy William Neill is an old hand at this kind of material and the smooth professionalism of the cast makes this film a fun show.

wig32a.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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26 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The Woman in Green (1945)

 

Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce play Holmes and Watson for the third last time in this outing, which I think is the last of the series with a few memorable moments. A superbly understated Henry Daniell appears as Professor Moriarty, the third actor in the Holmes series to play the role (the others being George Zucco and Lionel Atwill). Rathbone would later write that he regarded Daniell as the best of the Moriartys.

Also memorably cast in the film is Hillary Brooke as a hypnotist involved with Moriarty in the case. Brooke's icy regal beauty and sophistication are perfect for the part. Highlight of the film comes at its climax when Holmes allows himself to be hypnotized by Brooke, placing himself in peril in the process, of course.

 

Technically, Zucco's turn as Moriarty was not part of the series, since he was in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, a period piece for Twentieth Century Fox. But I guess that's a minor issue. :)

Hillary Brooke is really good (and really good-looking in this), making her third appearance in the series, each one giving her more and better screen time. She's one of those performers with whom I was always familiar from a television series (in her case, The Abbott and Costello Show), never realizing she had a body of work before hitting the tube. Her filmography probably would not lend itself to her being a SOTM, but a Hillary Brooke night might be appropriate.

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"Courage Of Lassie" - Fred M. Wilcox -1946 -

starring Elizabeth Taylor, Tom Drake and Lassie (Pal) who is playing "Bill" - 

Interesting film about a dog, Bill, who becomes the beloved pet of a young girl and then is injured in an accident - unbeknowest to the young girl - and then is trained as a war dog and becomes "a decorated hero" and then is being shipped to a rehab center and escapes and somehow returns to the young girl -

but he is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and is a danger to other animals -

he is slated to be desroyed until the truth of what he has endured is revealed -

an MGM film that is nicely, effectively done by everybody including the director and cast -

4883-courage-of-lassie-0-230-0-345-crop.

 

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16 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Thanks for the info, since I AM a huge Gracie fan, but---

Did you see this on TCM?  and if not, do you know if the channel has it scheduled?  I'm not one to bother watching movies or TV shows on my PC( I barely make it through short music clips), so maybe I'll see if a DVD is available.  I'm sure, since my GAL's in it, I should like it just fine.  ;)

Sepiatone

This is one of those 'lost' films..I posted the link to rarefilmm.com so everyone could watch it there free (they 'dig up' films that aren't on youtube, or otherwise available)..if you have a firestick, or other way to use an internet browser on your tv, you can watch if that way if you don't like watching on a pc (I personally like watching on a laptop or tablet..I fall asleep every night with something streaming on my tablet - my way of counting sheep, I guess).  I've never seen it anywhere except the site I mentioned, but good luck looking!

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