speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Now you people have me singing FOOTLOOSE. 

Damn you all so thoroughly.

Don't make me get the soap. Just remember, Santa Claus Is Watchin' You. This will get Footloose out of your head.

 

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20 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

 I Was A Teenage Serial Killer  (Watch TCM)

The moral of this story (for guys) is don’t remove your “protection” during sex or else your partner will beat the snot out of you, kill you, and stuff a banana in your mouth. I guess these is something symbolic there.

Mary, our “heroine,” then meets a male serial killer who is a straight white male who believes all the problems in the world are due to straight white males. The two hit it off well, until he brings home a bound and gagged woman and says he killed the woman’s boyfriend. “Without me?” screams Mary. She then does him in with a dustbuster.

Kristin Calabrese as Mary shows a modicum of talent, but the same cannot be said for anyone else. The photography is very poor, either intentionally or unintentionally. F-bombs are dropped constantly. The closing credits are interesting, my favorite being the guy billed as the “A**hole Drug Dealer.”

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Well, sounds interesting from your review, if I got time I'll see if it's On Demand.

 

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The Bells of Death - Hong Kong action star Yi Chang plays "Wei Fu" a man whose family is slaughtered by bandits. They kidnap his sister too so he trains and works to rescue her. He tracks down her killers and kills them off one by one before going against the whole gang all by himself. Along the way he finds a wife. The choreography in this one is pretty mediocre at times but that just adds to the charm. One cool scene is where Wei Fu and a bandit fight in candle light with the candles held on the tips of their swords. This is a very good action film and I recommend it. 

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Hit And Run (1957) Wrecking Yard Noir

hit-and-run-md-web.jpg

Written and directed by Hugo Hass who acted and directed a number of poverty row Film Noir, and based on a story by Herbert O. Phillips. The cinematography was by Walter Strenge and the Music by Franz Steininger..

Hit And Run stars Cleo Moore (711 Ocean Drive (1950), On Dangerous Ground (1951), Women's Prison (1955), and Over-Exposed (1956)) as Julie Hilmer, Hugo Haas as Gus Hilmer and hisTwin Brother, Vince Edwards (six classic Film Noir and Neo Noir The Mad Bomber (1973)) as Frank, Dolores Reed as Miranda, Mara Lea as Anita, Pat Goldin as the Undertaker, John Zaremba as Doctor, Robert Cassidy as the Sheriff, Carl Milletaire as the Lawyer, Dick Paxton as the Waiter, Julie Mitchum as Circus Girl Lion Tamer.

Another low budget Noir from Hass, that all follow variations of the same formula. The "Hass" formula being an average schlub who usually meets a woman (usually a blonde) who is just a little more than he can handle. He marries her. She takes advantage with the nearest warm body. The schlub pulls a neat twist some way or another and turns the tables on his wife and her lover.

The beauty of a Hugo Hass' productions were that so much was done on a shoestring, these films were probably shot in less than two weeks. Anybody with say a Canon EOS 70D and a boom mike and a handful of actors could easily make a similar film. The on location sets were two houses, a wrecking yard, a service station, a couple of cars and some interiors.

It's your typical low budget Hass Noir, watchable, a 6/10. Could use a restoration, screencaps and full review in Film Noir/Gangster.

 

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Just a few notes on Wrecking Yards

Hit And Run was a bit of a pleasant surprise. I'd never seen it before and did not know the storyline so when I saw it's wrecking yard setting I was hooked.

I lived in western Montana for roughly 24 years. Montana was quite off the beaten track back then. Coming from New York City I found much to my surprise that Montana was also in a sort of cultural and visual time lag. That visual time lag was in the vicinity of ten or twelve years. Instead of being 1972 it was as if you were still in 1962. There were quite a few cars still actively running about from the early to mid 60s and pickups and larger trucks from the late 40s and 50s.

They didn't use salt on the roads in Montana like they did in New York. Vehicles had a much longer life span. In winter after a big snow you didn't see pavement again in quite a few areas of the mountains until spring. They sanded the roads, so basically you drove on frozen sand packed snow the color of light butterscotch. Occasionally you'd get a mid winter thaw and sections of road in the open and exposed to the sun would bear off, the shaded passes in the mountains though would not. They had pull offs that were chain up areas and there were lots days where I made trips from Libby to Kalispell with tire chains for most of the 89 mile way on my 1949 Chevy 3/4 ton.

During my years in Montana there was also period of years back between 1977 - 1980 when my wife's step father-in-law Hugh suffered from a heart attack. He was an old cowboy/trucker who had made a lot money driving supply trucks 24/7 on the North Slope Haul Road for the Alaska Pipeline right at the get go in 1974. He made a killing. When he got back to Montana a year later he bought out his partner in the wrecking yard he part owned, married my wife's mother, and in 1976 had a mild heart attack. He had to take it easy and needed help to run the place.  I needed work so I offered to help out. We had a rent free house in the year to live in once we cleaned out the auto parts that were stored in it. The wrecking yard was on the Flathead Indian Reservation, just South of Flathead Lake and just North of Ronan.

The way a typical Western wrecking yard, where you have a lot of acres to spread out is, you place all the makes of cars built by the same manufacturer together. That way makes it much easier to find interchanging parts. Most manufactures use the same carbs, starters, radiators, generators, water pumps, power steering pumps, gas tanks, and some body parts etc;, etc., between models. Ford used FoMoCo parts in Fords, Lincolns, and Mercurys. General Motors uses Delco parts in Chevys, GMCs, Buick, Cadillacs, Oldsmobiles. Chrysler uses Mopar parts in Chrysler, Dodges, and Plymouths.

For instance the only difference in a Delco starter was the "nose cone" where it bolted to the bell housing. It was a simple matter of undoing two bolts holding the "nose cone" to the starter motor and putting the one that fit the car you needed it for. Some starters mounted on the drivers side some on the passenger side.

So you'd set aside areas of the yard accordingly, Chevyland, Fordland, Dodgeville, the smaller company still in the business in the 70's was American Motors models and Jeep was still their best known model, they had their own motors and transmissions, however they often used accessory parts from all of the big three. We still had recently demised brands like Studebaker, Nash, Rambler, etc., etc., that we kept together. Sort of a everything else land.

Our supply of autos came from cleaning up junked cars from the various farms and ranches, or from what people wanted to sell us. We never payed more than $100 dollars for pickups of $50 dollars for cars. Being on the Rez the Flatheads would get occasional money allotments and they'd haul their junkers in to us and buy new cars and trucks.

If we had time we'd either tinker around with the cars to see if we could get them running again. This BTW was a major plot point in Hit And Run, or we'd pull the quick selling items, the generators, alternators, batteries, and starters, but only if the starters were easy to get to, which was usually on the six cylinder engines. Those parts we'd shelve in the shop.

We ran the yard do-it-yourself. We'd let people park at the shop and let them wander around with their own tools looking for what they needed. When they came back with the parts they took off, a lot of times we'd just pull a price out of our ****. We had a sort of sliding scale where we'd give breaks to down and out folks that looked as if they could use one. But even then you'd get some crazies. I remember one guy wanted a used fuel pump. A new one was about 30-35 dollars, I told the guy ten dollars and he went apocalyptic. "what is it plated in gold!" He paid it though/

We'd get advance orders over the phone and head out with the fork lifts and grab off parts. We had two of them an ex logging company Ross lift truck for the big stuff and a smaller Scoopmobile for the regular work. Each forklift had a toolbox, a cutting torch, and an air wrench.

I got to where I could pull any motor in twenty minutes. You didn't **** around undoing everything, you just cut all the wires and hose lines. Lifted the car up by the front end. Took off the drive shaft, and air-wrenched off the bolts holding up the transmission mount. That loosed the engine and tranny. Then you dropped the car back down to the ground and either air wrenched off the engine mount bolts or cut them off with the smoke wrench. The final step was taking off the carburetor. Once the carb was off, you had the central hole in the intake manifold that you could insert a "C" shaped hook and with that pull the motor and tranny out.

The cars that had pretty much been stripped down to hulks we crushed in a homemade "smasher." The "smasher" was a 3/4 inch welded steel box filled with about  2 1/2 feet of concrete. It was hinged at one end. The steel lined concrete box fit into a slightly larger hollow steel box. This steel box had two slots where the forks of the Ross lift truck could slide in and lift out the crushed car.

The "smasher" ran off of an old Chrysler Hemi motor still housed in the front end of a 1956 Dodge D-500. The motor ran a winch which lifted one end of the concrete filled steel box. A hulk filled with as much scrap weight, i.e. cracked engine blocks, wheel hubs, axle housings etc. would be placed in the hollow steel box and the smasher would gravity drop upon it. The crushed car would be lifted out and stacked. When we got a semi load of crushed cars we'd haul them to Tacoma for scrap cash.
 

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17 hours ago, EricJ said:

There's a new movement among religious scholars to say--since our idea of Jesus as a long-haired "hippie" only comes from assumptions off the Shroud of Turin, and that he had long blonde/brown hair comes from medieval European tastes--that an actual first-century Judean would have looked much different, more Jewish/middle-Eastern with short dark hair, and yes, rather like Kenny Loggins.

 

I dunno....

I think Loggins would be surprised to find some people think HE "looks Jewish".  

And all I could find comes from Daniel: 7:1(I think), "his clothing was white as snow, and the hair of his head like pure wool"

Don't sound like Kenny to me....  ;)

Sepiatone

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Grand Slam (1933) I guess TCM aired this in honor of Glenda Farrell as SOTM.  Well, she’s in it alright, but only in a couple of brief scenes. Her character, as the friend – and possibly more – of Frank McHugh’s ghost writer – is a ditzy blonde who is always forgetting something on her person, a shoe, a purse.  The leads are Loretta Young and Paul Lukas.  Lukas plays a Russian émigré working as a waiter before – it only takes one game – dethroning the reigning bridge expert and becoming the best player in the country. 

Young and Lukas are the ideal married couple at first, all bohemian charm, before the game of bridge tears them apart.  The characters are smug and wooden, and missing is that crackling Warner Bros. pre-code banter and more of Glenda Farrell.  Helen Vinson adds a welcome dose of cynicism as a society woman with eyes for Lukas. Overall, an okay picture.  The best scene is the one in which Young and Lukas board an outdoor bus at night, and rear projection provides the glittering lights of Manhattan.

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35 minutes ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Grand Slam (1933) I guess TCM aired this in honor of Glenda Farrell as SOTM.  Well, she’s in it alright, but only in a couple of brief scenes. Her character, as the friend – and possibly more – of Frank McHugh’s ghost writer – is a ditzy blonde who is always forgetting something on her person, a shoe, a purse.  The leads are Loretta Young and Paul Lukas.  Lukas plays a Russian émigré working as a waiter before – it only takes one game – dethroning the reigning bridge expert and becoming the best player in the country. 

Young and Lukas are the ideal married couple at first, all bohemian charm, before the game of bridge tears them apart.  The characters are smug and wooden, and missing is that crackling Warner Bros. pre-code banter and more of Glenda Farrell.  Helen Vinson adds a welcome dose of cynicism as a society woman with eyes for Lukas. Overall, an okay picture.  The best scene is the one in which Young and Lukas board an outdoor bus at night, and rear projection provides the glittering lights of Manhattan.

Now this is uncanny.

I just made the switch to HULU last night and was pleasantly surprised to discover that I apparently can select from about 2/3 of what has aired in the last month or so on TCM.

I was thrilled to see GRAND SLAM (1933) come up as an option  because someone gave it a review in this thread when it last aired very recently and, as a novice fan of the game of BRIDGE, and as a huge fan of PRECODE movies and especially PRECODES with LORETTA YOUNG, I was bummed I missed this.

Whoever wrote this (admittedly odd) movie HAD to have had something to do with the later PETE SMITH SHORTS for MGM as the humor is much the same. i don't like the PETE SMITH SHORTS, but that is largely because I do not like PETE SMITH'S VOICE.

This was the closest thing I have seen to an out-and-out ZUCKER BROS. style comedy, it gets especially nutty towards the end where a character is pretty much murdered (it fades out, but you hear the gunshot) and it's treated as a joke (and you know what? it is kind of funny.)

there is also a hilarious scene between two elderly, seemingly genteel couples having a quiet game at home that i just can't do justice to by describing. it was one of the funniest things i've ever seen though.

"you remember last year? when Walter broke my nose over that bad bid I made?"

there's also some camera trickery and freeze frame photography involved that you may or may not find humorous, but it is most certainly unique.

one's appreciation of this film is contingent largely on one's familiarity with the game of bridge...

i don't want to go into great detail, but it is a game of four people where two sets of partners are trying to convey to one another "i think i can win *this many* hands of the 14 suits we are getting ready to play PROVIDED THAT we make *clubs/spades/hearts/diamonds* the trump suit.

and i will tell you, here are fewer things in life more frustrating than having, oh let's say the king, queen, ace and five number cards of hearts and telling your partner in repeated bids  "I can win this by three...then four...then five hearts as the trump suit" only to have them INSIST TO YOU IN THEIR BIDS they they can win all 14 suits with spades as the trump suit...

SO YOU RELENT, and then they put down their cards and they've got the 3,6, and Jack of SPADES and that is ALL THEY HAVE.

AND THEN (more often than not)- their part of the game is done with and they sit back and leave YOU to CLEAN UP THE MESS THAT THEY HAVE MADE by their horrible, stupid, possibly drunken bidding.

it's a good analogy for marriage in general.

this movie NAILS that sense of WANTING TO MURDER YOUR PARTNER and runs with it. 

i generally do not care for PAUL LUKAS, but he surprised me with how animated he was in the part- the visible struggle he had with English and thick accent that hinders his later performances is actually an asset here.

you are right tho, GLENDA FARRELL is sadly not in it enough.

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

there's also some camera trickery and freeze frame photography involved that you may or may not find humorous, but it is most certainly unique.

 

Yes, the freeze-frame photography was inventive, i.e. the whole world stopped because a bridge game was being decided. Very clever indeed.  Unfortunately, I don't play bridge and perhaps my review of the film would have been different if I did play. 

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3 minutes ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Yes, the freeze-frame photography was inventive, i.e. the whole world stopped because a bridge game was being decided. Very clever indeed.  Unfortunately, I don't play bridge and perhaps my review of the film would have been different if I did play. 

I also LOVED the notion that there would be an entire FRONT PAGE newspaper headline:

"BRIDGE KING DETHRONED BY WAITER AT CAFE SOCIETY TOURNAMENT!!"

I mean, let's let The Depression, the boiling unrest in Europe, and the continued threat of organized crime in America take a back seat, THIS IS NEWS!!!!!"

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oh my!

did a google image search for GRAND SLAM (1933) and discovered this!- I guess this was a publicity still, but it's not exactly indicative of the content of the movie- (don't know why they used Loretta's actual name in the ad.)

MV5BNzdkZmFjNzQtMTNkNy00YzFmLTliYTUtNzIw

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

oh my!

did a google image search for GRAND SLAM (1933) and discovered this!- I guess this was a publicity still, but it's not exactly indicative of the content of the movie- (don't know why they used Loretta's actual name in the ad.)

Lorna,

There's something confusing about that caption - Sally Blane is actually the sister of Loretta Young, and I don't see Sally listed in the credits for Grand Slam.  I guess they could have made a publicity photo with someone who is not in the film but I wonder if Sally had a part that was cut from the final release of the film?  I also checked IMDB and could not find any other films with both Paul Lukas and Sally Blane.

That really is a provocative photo, so it's too bad if such a scene was cut from the film.

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13 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

the smaller company still in the business in the 70's was American Motors models and Jeep was still their best known model,

They also had the Pacer:

145958.jpg

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

MV5BNzdkZmFjNzQtMTNkNy00YzFmLTliYTUtNzIw

Obviously an error. Film historians will immediately recognize this as a still from the unreleased Wham Bam Thank You Ma'am.

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34 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

Obviously an error. Film historians will immediately recognize this as a still from the unreleased Wham Bam Thank You Ma'am.

Close Rich, but the actual title of this film was Suffragette City.

(...and even though and as you said a film that was never released, apparently, yes, David Bowie was once able to get his hands on a copy of it)

 

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Moran of the Lady Letty (1922)

One of Rudolph Valentino's less well remembered films, this sea faring silent is a surprisingly enjoyable romp, with Rudy in the role of a pampered soft society patron who, after being shanghaied aboard a ship with an "evil" reputation, after a month at sea turns into a swabbie he-man capable of beating up much of the crew.

The title character is played by then popular actress Dorothy Dalton as the tomboy daughter of the captain of another ship, the Lady Letty, of course. When that ship meets a disaster at sea through deadly coal gas consumption an unconscious Dalton is found by Valentino when his ship's crew come aboard looking for loot.

This will soon lead to Walter Long, as the shanghaiing ship's larcenous captain, giving Dalton the leering eye, and Valentino appointing himself her defender. But Long is into other things, as well, including selling women to a Mexican outlaw band, so the problems for Rudy and Dorothy are far from over.

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Valentino is quite natural and engaging in his role, and seems to come particularly alive after his character's transformation into a sea faring outdoorsy type. He and Dalton work well together, though romance does not immediately bloom between them, especially after Dalton says men are not for her and she should have been born a boy. It's not what you might think it is, though, from that statement, as the story further evolves towards the inevitable.

Surprisingly Dalton gets top billing in this film despite all the publicity Valentino had received the previous year for his performance in The Sheik. In complete contrast to that film in which Rudy was a hit playing a desert seducer, there's an innocent sweetness about the manner in which he chivalrously treats Dalton in Moran of the Lady Letty. Nor is he the ham in this film that he had been on a number of occasions in The Sheik.

Walter Long excels in another of his ogre roles. There's not much subtlety to Long's kind of in-your-face villainy. He's either actively lusting for a woman (and more than ready to get physical about it, whether she likes it or not) or he's plotting the death of someone who gets in his way of making some kind of profit. Most buffs today may best remember this character actor for his work in blackface as Gus, the renegade, in The Birth of a Nation and for later scaring the heck out of Laurel and Hardy in one of their films, Pardon Us, as well as a couple of their shorts.

Moran of the Lady Letty has been nicely restored, in combination with TCM, by Flicker Films who have released it on DVD as part of a 2 disc collection called Valentino. The film has a new musical score by Robert Israel.

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2.5 out of 4

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13 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

Lorna,

There's something confusing about that caption - Sally Blane is actually the sister of Loretta Young, and I don't see Sally listed in the credits for Grand Slam.  I guess they could have made a publicity photo with someone who is not in the film but I wonder if Sally had a part that was cut from the final release of the film?  I also checked IMDB and could not find any other films with both Paul Lukas and Sally Blane.

That really is a provocative photo, so it's too bad if such a scene was cut from the film.

I meant to mention that.

I recently saw NIGHT OF TERROR (1933)-  a pretty good pre-code BELA LUGOSI thriller which is available on youtube and amazon prime- which costars SALLY BLANE and I can say that she and Loretta are like twins born a year apart.

They look and sound SO MUCH ALIKE it is quite easy to confuse the two (which is something, since they have an unusual, wide-eyed, unique "look")

Watching it, I would not have been able to tell you if it was Loretta or Sally and that is something since I am a big fan of Loretta.

So I think it's possible that whoever captioned that pic made a mistake and switched Loretta's name for Sally's ...and I have all sorts of suspicions that LORETTA, SALLY and THEIR MOTHER had to have a real sit down about who was going to get to be THE STAR since they resembled one another so closely that there could be only one.

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I just checked out "OBSESSION" (1949)- according to the print,  according to imdb, it is called THE HIDDEN ROOM, OBSESSION is not even listed as an alternate title.

Shrug. Whatever you call it: I liked it.

Anyhoo, it's a black and white British film directed by EDWARD DMYTRYK (too lazy to google, hope I didn't mess his name up too bad) after he was blacklisted and forced out of HOLLYWOOD.

It's a very engaging (rather Hitchcockian) thriller with ROBERT NEWTON (one year before TREASURE ISLAND), who stars as a malicious, possessive husband whose roaming wife causes him to snap and imprison one of her (many) lovers in a hidden room beneath a bombed-out building close to their townhouse while he plots to murder, dismember, and then destroy the body via acid bath.

(This role likely put Newton in just the right frame of mind to go to work for Disney.)

The acting is good, especially by the younger American playing the wife's lover. Again, too lazy to Google, but he apparently later played Luke's uncle in STAR WARS. He brought a sense of levity to the part that worked well.

although it was a small film with a low budget, it still managed to have some interesting things to imply about life in POSTWAR BRITAIN and the tenuous relationship she had been somewhat forced to forge with her former upstart colony, America.

A very compelling film, you will really want to know how it ends. I checked it out on TCM ON HULU.

Oh, the real star of this movie is MONTY THE DOG though!!!!! Like, I dont know if the BAFTAS were a thing in 1949, but Monty deserved Best Supporting for this.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I just checked out "OBSESSION" (1949)- according to the print,  according to imdb, it is called THE HIDDEN ROOM, OBSESSION is not even listed as an alternate title.

Shrug. Whatever you call it: I liked it.

Anyhoo, it's a black and white British film directed by EDWARD DMYTRYK (too lazy to google, hope I didn't mess his name up too bad) after he was blacklisted and forced out of HOLLYWOOD.

It's a very engaging (rather Hitchcockian) thriller with ROBERT NEWTON (one year before TREASURE ISLAND), who stars as a malicious, possessive husband whose roaming wife causes him to snap and imprison one of her (many) lovers in a hidden room beneath a bombed-out building close to their townhouse while he plots to murder, dismember, and then destroy the body via acid bath.

(This role likely put Newton in just the right frame of mind to go to work for Disney.)

The acting is good, especially by the younger American playing the wife's lover. Again, too lazy to Google, but he apparently later played Luke's uncle in STAR WARS. He brought a sense of levity to the part that worked well.

although it was a small film with a low budget, it still managed to have some interesting things to imply about life in POSTWAR BRITAIN and the tenuous relationship she had been somewhat forced to forge with her former upstart colony, America.

A very compelling film, you will really want to know how it ends. I checked it out on TCM ON HULU.

Oh, the real star of this movie is MONTY THE DOG though!!!!! Like, I dont know if the BAFTAS were a thing in 1949, but Monty deserved Best Supporting for this.

I watched this yesterday and found it very entertaining. Newton does not ham it up (for a change), and Phil Brown as the American is actually very good. I've seen him in a few films (besides Star Wars), but this is the first time I was really impressed. His performance got better and better with each scene. The Scotland Yard Inspector was akin to a Columbo-like character, always showing up with "one more question" to ask. Nice little gem of a movie.

And yeah, you are right about the dog. He was just fantastic ... and cuddly. The ending was very appropriate.

However, those guys who were supposed to be American sailors seemed to be wearing British military uniforms. Oops.

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Tuesday double feature, courtesy of TCM and FXM.

Starlift (1951)

A revue-style entertainment from Warner Bros., this was intended as a morale booster at the time of the Korean war. Around the thin central concept of the rocky romance between an actress and a soldier who both happen to hail from the same town (Youngstown, Ohio), the filmmakers decided to craft a series of songs and skits involving WB stars and others who perform for the troops.

The film gets off to a very bright start, but therein lies the trouble. For the most part, the best songs and skits and parts of the story are in the first 45 minutes, and aside from a brief appearance from Jane Wyman, the rest of the film doesn't have the same snap. That said though, Doris Day is as ebullient and charming as ever in her 15 minutes, and Ruth Roman also was a pleasure with her no-nonsense attitude. So if you do come across this film, at least check out the first part. Best recommended for Doris Day completists.

Dear Brigitte (1965)



Always have had a soft spot for family comedies, when they are charming, witty, and engaging, and this fits the bill. Its a harmless, lovely entertainment. Jimmy Stewart is is good, warm mode as a father who finds that hiss son (an endearing Bill Mumy) is a math genius who can solve the hardest of equations in just seconds and also has the knack for figuring out horse races as well. True he's also colorblind and tonedeaf, but not even geniuses can have everything. Glynis Johns has a bit of a smaller part as Stewart's wife but she is as welcome as ever and knows exactly how to play a scene. The film receives its name from all the letters the boy sends to Brigitte Bardot, upon whom he has a case of a very youthful crush. Ms. Bardot actually appears toward the end, and her cameo is one of the highpoints of the film. This film might not be appreciated by cynics, nor by those wanting the height of sophistication, but as an example of cinematic comfort food, it is utterly enchanting.

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IIRC, the movie was named Dear Brigitte because Bardot explicitly asked that she not get a credit for her cameo.  This was the only way they could get her name on screen.

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"Jeanne Dielman 23 Commerce Quay 1080 Brussels - 1983 (NYC) - Chantal  Akerman -

starring Delphine Seyrig and Jan Decorte -

"spoiler alert" -

is it a masterpiece or is it a mistake -

the film shows us three long days in the life of a woman who is essentially a caregiver (her teenage son) and turns tricks during the late afternoon -

her husband is long gone -

the film is devoted to her mundane tasks like cooking and cleaning in order to keep her life going -

it is deliberately non-dramatic -

it is also three and a half-hours long -

the glacial pace might make it seem longer -

during her first day - on screen - she is obsessed with the daily tasks that are required to make life comfortable for her and her son -

her client for the day seems just a matter of the daily routine -

her son comes home after school and they have soup and meat and potatoes and barely talk and then go to sleep -

her second day doesn't go as smoothly as the first -

her second client causes her to overcook the potatoes -

so she goes to the supermarket and buys some more -

she seems to be unravelling as she peels the potatoes -

they are somehow hard to peel -

her son comes home and talks about sex -

the "thursting" that is involved in intercourse -

she is not interested and goes to bed -

her third day begins badly -

she cannot mix her morning drink right -

and throws it out -

for the first time, she sits down - and thinks -

we try hard to simply imagine what she's thinking -

then she goes in search of a missing button for her son's coat -

she cannot find a similar button -

then, she goes home to service a client -

he will not pull himself out of her -

she panics and gets dressed -

he won't get off the bed -

she stabs him with a scissors -

then she sits down - in the darkness - and thinks -

what? - of the inevitable? -

le fin or the end - the film is over -

you will either love it or hate it -

masterful performances from Delphine Seyrig and Jan Decorte -

impeccable masterly direction from Chantal Akerman -

4YBEZZNLABGPRJ7KQWIEI7FVYQ.jpg

 

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51 minutes ago, rayban said:

"Jeanne Dielman 23 Commerce Quay 1080 Brussels - 1983 (NYC) - Chantal  Akerman -

starring Delphine Seyrig and Jan Decorte -

"spoiler alert" -

is it a masterpiece or is it a mistake -

I consider it a mistake. It's 3 hours of a woman walking around and doing dishes. The only interesting part of the movie is at the very end. I get what it's trying to say but that doesn't make it a "good movie" in my opinion. 

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9 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

I consider it a mistake. It's 3 hours of a woman walking around and doing dishes. The only interesting part of the movie is at the very end. I get what it's trying to say but that doesn't make it a "good movie" in my opinion. 

The critical reaction to the film was very divided.

For me, the "dramatic highpoint" was the woman's difficulty in peeling the potatoes.

jeannedielman.png

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Gotta love the tile kitchen....  :o

 

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