speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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1 minute ago, Fedya said:

Gotta love the tile kitchen....  :o

 

That'd be irritating to clean! Especially the area above the stove.  I love her stainless steel water pitcher though.

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2 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

I consider it a mistake. It's 3 hours of a woman walking around and doing dishes. The only interesting part of the movie is at the very end. I get what it's trying to say but that doesn't make it a "good movie" in my opinion. 

My take as well, although, to be fair, it was on too late for me to stay awake past about the first day.

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10 hours ago, rayban said:

The critical reaction to the film was very divided.

For me, the "dramatic highpoint" was the woman's difficulty in peeling the potatoes.

jeannedielman.png

Sounds a little like MRS DALLOWAY. 

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Last night, on ThisTV, was another "questionable" Christmas movie, REINDEER GAMES with BEN AFFLECK, GARY SINISE and CHARLIZE THERON.

Centered around a heist of a Northern Michigan Indian casino( to be pulled off on Christmas Eve), it does contain some not really bad performances from the three and even the peripheral cast members.

I considered it a "questionable" Christmas movie in that there's still that debate surrounding DIE HARD.  And that the stories DO end happily for the protagonists in both movies is another reason for this movie's inclusion in the category. 

Considered by many( including some cast members) the film was a critical and box office failure.  But, as one man's trash is another's treasure, IMHO it's really not that bad of a flick, for the type of film it's intended to be.  I HAVE seen much worse, and even PAID a lot more to see 'em.  ;)

Sepiatone

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7 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Last night, on ThisTV, was another "questionable" Christmas movie, REINDEER GAMES with BEN AFFLECK, GARY SINISE and CHARLIZE THERON.

Centered around a heist of a Northern Michigan Indian casino( to be pulled off on Christmas Eve), it does contain some not really bad performances from the three and even the peripheral cast members.

I considered it a "questionable" Christmas movie in that there's still that debate surrounding DIE HARD.  And that the stories DO end happily for the protagonists in both movies is another reason for this movie's inclusion in the category. 

Considered by many( including some cast members) the film was a critical and box office failure.  But, as one man's trash is another's treasure, IMHO it's really not that bad of a flick, for the type of film it's intended to be.  I HAVE seen much worse, and even PAID a lot more to see 'em.  ;)

Sepiatone

The most interesting thing about REINDEER GAMES  is the BEHIND THE SCENES story About the producers approaching Vin Diesel – who at the time was not a huge huge star but an up and comer For a supporting part.

his “people” sent word to the producers that if VIN DIESEL were to be involved, extensive rewrites would need to be undertaken to make it “a Vin Diesel movie. The lead role would be for Vin Diesel. Vin Diesel would not consider anything less than $10 million. Vin Diesel would have full cast and director approval. And the working title should be changed to “VIN DIESEL, the movie.”

I exaggerate slightly, but only slightly. It was one of the more amusing Hollywood anecdotes of the time...More so than anything in the film itself.

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If I recall correctly, Diesels people also wanted to replace John Frankenheimer as the freaking director, And Ben Affleck and Charlize Theron had already been cast in the lead roles, So it took a pretty colossal pair of cajones to make all those demands.

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Vin Diesel? I must not be reading that right. Why would John Frankenheimer agree to work with shallow clowns like Vin Diesel or Charlize Theron? He must have been on his last legs and needy for money or something

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52 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Vin Diesel? I must not be reading that right. Why would John Frankenheimer agree to work with shallow clowns like Vin Diesel or Charlize Theron? He must have been on his last legs and needy for money or something

I think you hit on it with the last sentence. 

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10 hours ago, Thenryb said:

My take as well, although, to be fair, it was on too late for me to stay awake past about the first day.

Of her three days on screen, that first day was her best.

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13 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

That'd be irritating to clean! Especially the area above the stove.  I love her stainless steel water pitcher though.

That was her second day - she was starting to unravel.

Has there ever been a similar film?

I don't think so.

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The most interesting thing about REINDEER GAMES  is the BEHIND THE SCENES story About the producers approaching Vin Diesel – who at the time was not a huge huge star but an up and comer For a supporting part.

his “people” sent word to the producers that if VIN DIESEL were to be involved, extensive rewrites would need to be undertaken to make it “a Vin Diesel movie. The lead role would be for Vin Diesel. Vin Diesel would not consider anything less than $10 million. Vin Diesel would have full cast and director approval. And the working title should be changed to “VIN DIESEL, the movie.”

I exaggerate slightly, but only slightly. It was one of the more amusing Hollywood anecdotes of the time...More so than anything in the film itself.

"Vin Diesel" has practically become a codeword among the audience for "The star that studios and press agents insist on strategically promoting as the next A-star, despite never having a success with the public".  (It used to be "Heath Ledger", but that changed.)
I knew "xXx" and "Chronicles of Riddick" were the more infamous examples of this, but I didn't know how far back Operation: Diesel went, as Universal--like other studios who think their expensive A-stars are the reason why a movie did well at the box office--tried to credit all of the "Fast & the Furious" series' success on Vin Diesel & Dwayne Johnson.

(When "Chronicles of Riddick", the sequel to Diesel's minor-cult "Pitch Black", came out with full mega-budget studio push, Universal pumped the first movie back on TV stations with "The movie that started it all!"  Um, "started" what, exactly?)

We know what happened to Dwayne, but last year's "xXx: the Return of Xander Cage" also reminds us what happened to Vin.  😛

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5 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Vin Diesel? I must not be reading that right. Why would John Frankenheimer agree to work with shallow clowns like Vin Diesel or Charlize Theron? He must have been on his last legs and needy for money or something

That's pretty much it--Gritty directors from the 70's, like Sidney Lumet and Sydney Pollack, were down to just generic action dramas by the time they hit retirement in the late 90's and early 00's, and Frankenheimer was down to TNT cable movies, Robert DeNiro in "Ronin", and taking over for that disastrous Marlon Brando "Island of Dr. Moreau".

...It happens, sooner or later.  😥

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On 12/2/2018 at 2:09 PM, EricJ said:

...that an actual first-century Judean would have looked much different, more Jewish/middle-Eastern with short dark hair, and yes, rather like Kenny Loggins.

 

I had no idea that Jesus probably looked like Kenny Loggins. So kind of you to share this revelation.

I'm sure Richard Dawkins will add this to his touring repetoire if he speaks again near Liberty University.

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

That's pretty much it--Gritty directors from the 70's, like Sidney Lumet and Sydney Pollack, were down to just generic action dramas by the time they hit retirement in the late 90's and early 00's, and Frankenheimer was down to TNT cable movies, Robert DeNiro in "Ronin", and taking over for that disastrous Marlon Brando "Island of Dr. Moreau".

...It happens, sooner or later.  😥

FRANKENHEIMER also directed an episode of TALES FROM THE CRYPT, which was the cable equivalent of a gig on MURDER SHE WROTE: It was something you did to make the house payment when absolutely *no one* else would hire you. 

...except with a gig on MURDER SHE WROTE there was at least a certain quiet dignity.

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Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

After burning my left eye with shampoo, I settled into a chair with coffee and a tube of Muro 128. With one eye open I tried to watch the above titled movie I had taped from TCM. It's about three hours long and first time through I slept or fast forwarded my way through. Upon reaching the ending, though I anticipated it when she brought the scissors in from the kitchen and time did not allow her to return them, I felt it necessary to go back to look for clues; to hear/read every conversation and not miss anything. The ending came around again and I was not certain that she was having an **** or discomfort I know it's possible for them to look the same. I did notice the often prominent image of herself, her deceased husband and her boy. I also noticed that her client looked exactly like her husband in the photo. I've been googling around and have yet to find this very obvious similarity discussed. Too obvious?

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20 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

That'd be irritating to clean! Especially the area above the stove.  I love her stainless steel water pitcher though.

Gotta dig that plaid pitcher. 

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2 hours ago, Tapestries said:

Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

After burning my left eye with shampoo, I settled into a chair with coffee and a tube of Muro 128. With one eye open I tried to watch the above titled movie I had taped from TCM. It's about three hours long and first time through I slept or fast forwarded my way through. Upon reaching the ending, though I anticipated it when she brought the scissors in from the kitchen and time did not allow her to return them, I felt it necessary to go back to look for clues; to hear/read every conversation and not miss anything. The ending came around again and I was not certain that she was having an **** or discomfort I know it's possible for them to look the same. I did notice the often prominent image of herself, her deceased husband and her boy. I also noticed that her client looked exactly like her husband in the photo. I've been googling around and have yet to find this very obvious similarity discussed. Too obvious?

Probably, the last thing that the film would want to be is - obvious.

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As movies go, Jeanne Dielmann is an excellent graduate seminar paper. Recording it and using the fast forward is much better than seeing it in real time. However, if memory serves, there are occasional showings of Jeanne Dielmann where, just as at Rocky Horror showings, fans bring some of the items Jeanne uses during her daily routine.

John Frankenheimer is one of the very best American directors of the 1960s. Films like The Manchurian Candidate and Seconds look even better now than they did then, wonderful on the big screen. Like so many of his contemporaries, Frankenheimer had drug problems (he has talked about this in interviews), and this harmed his career. He eventually did a lot of television work, including some mini-series which are highly regarded (I am not familiar with them). He also made films like Ronin and The French Connection II, which have notable chase scenes. My take on Reindeer Games is just like Sepiatone's. It's not bad, entertaining enough but not the kind of film one would have hoped for from this very gifted director.

 

 

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Swimming With Men (2018)--Rob Brydon stars as an accountant in the midst of a middle-age meltdown, who meets a group of amateur male synchronized swimmers at a local pool. They recognize him as 'one of their own'--looking for an outlet to escape life's pressures, and invite him into the club:  rule number one of the swim club is don't talk about the swim club.  Another rule is never talk about your private life at the swim club..and that's too bad.  Brydon's life is clearly the thread that winds throughout the film, but we learn precious little about his fellow swim mates, and through a few snippets, it sounds like their back stories might have been more interesting than his.  The club members range in age from a tattooed 20 something (always running from police) to a 70 something widower..with an diverse assortment of characters in between.  Brydon is a rather logical fellow, but leaves his wife after their bratty teen son feeds him false reports of mom having affair/mom wants divorce..mom (Jane Horrocks) seems to be in the dark about Brydon's behavior changes. Change he does..from the fellow who calculated the risk of everything to one willing to work against odds for a competition the team enters. I imagine some will label this sort of a 'Full Monty in the pool'..but it isn't..not quite the camaraderie or comedy.  The sight of the men, none in olympic shape, trying to learn the finer points of water ballet are amusing, but don't look for laugh out loud funny.  The performances by Brydon, Rupert Graves, Adeel Akhtar, Jim Carter, and others was top notch, and I thought some of the camera work (from city scenes that accentuate the 'one-ness' of everyone to the underwater shots) was pretty good.  It's a movie that's hard to classify..I'll just say it's about changes life hands us, changes we make on our own, and taking chances.  Although I wouldn't say it was a must-see, it was an enjoyable film with a few tugs on the heart strings.  source: Cinema apk  Image result for Swimming with Men

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Derailed (2005) Directed by Mikael Håfström written by Stuart Beattie based on James Siegel's novel. 
Stars: Clive Owen, Jennifer Aniston, Vincent Cassel, RZA, and Xzibit. 

A NIPO, Noir In Plot Only, would have made a good neo noir with the use of classic noir visual stylistics and a more streamlined story. It has some nice sequences but others that are way too long. As is it runs an hour and forty-eight minutes.

Reminded me a lot of Pitfall with an extra twist but it spends way too much time on Owen's family home life angle seemed like twenty minutes of shmaltz that it didn't need, plus a sort of epilog that it also didn't need. Too bad 6/10

Derailed Poster

 

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I can't believe it: I was watching a foreign film and my spouse started watching it, too, all the way to the end. He never does that. But the movie was Marriage Italian Style, and that explains a lot. In Italian, at least when directed by Vittorio De Sica, Sophia Loren is a great actress, not merely an astonishingly beautiful woman. The switches from comedy to drama and back to comedy always seem right, and that's very hard to bring off. Again, congratulations to Vittorio De Sica. Marcello Mastroianni is perfect, though his role doesn't have the depth of Loren's character. Aldo Puglisi is fine in a supporting role, and Tecla Scarano is a hoot as Rosalia. The great cinematography is merely an added bonus. Look at the gleaming wood tones in this film: for all the overuse of dark brown in contemporary film and television, no one comes close to using a brown-forward palette this well.

Mastroianni's suits are great, too. I'd love to have suits just like them, especially the medium blue and the oyster-colored ones.

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10 hours ago, kingrat said:

I can't believe it: I was watching a foreign film and my spouse started watching it, too, all the way to the end. He never does that. But the movie was Marriage Italian Style, and that explains a lot. In Italian, at least when directed by Vittorio De Sica, Sophia Loren is a great actress, not merely an astonishingly beautiful woman. The switches from comedy to drama and back to comedy always seem right, and that's very hard to bring off. Again, congratulations to Vittorio De Sica. Marcello Mastroianni is perfect, though his role doesn't have the depth of Loren's character. Aldo Puglisi is fine in a supporting role, and Tecla Scarano is a hoot as Rosalia. The great cinematography is merely an added bonus. Look at the gleaming wood tones in this film: for all the overuse of dark brown in contemporary film and television, no one comes close to using a brown-forward palette this well.

Mastroianni's suits are great, too. I'd love to have suits just like them, especially the medium blue and the oyster-colored ones.

Sophia should have won the Oscar for this film..........

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11 hours ago, kingrat said:

I can't believe it: I was watching a foreign film and my spouse started watching it, too, all the way to the end. He never does that. But the movie was Marriage Italian Style, and that explains a lot. In Italian, at least when directed by Vittorio De Sica, Sophia Loren is a great actress, not merely an astonishingly beautiful woman. The switches from comedy to drama and back to comedy always seem right, and that's very hard to bring off. Again, congratulations to Vittorio De Sica. Marcello Mastroianni is perfect, though his role doesn't have the depth of Loren's character. Aldo Puglisi is fine in a supporting role, and Tecla Scarano is a hoot as Rosalia. The great cinematography is merely an added bonus. Look at the gleaming wood tones in this film: for all the overuse of dark brown in contemporary film and television, no one comes close to using a brown-forward palette this well.

Mastroianni's suits are great, too. I'd love to have suits just like them, especially the medium blue and the oyster-colored ones.

Sophia was at her peak in those sexy Italian comedies of the early '60s, I feel. Working in her native land seemed to bring out the best in the actress, passionate and playful and zesty. Did any actress ever have more natural hearty laughter than Sophia? Seeing her in Yesterday Today and Tomorrow (particularly the third segment in which she played Mara the prostitute) or Boccaccio '70, this is Loren at her zenith. You have to see this Loren to fully appreciate her. The fact that she was one of the world's great voluptuous beauties didn't hurt either.

Somehow whenever she appeared in a Hollywood product some of that great spontaneous joie de vivre that is so much a part of her earthy appeal in her Italian films seems to be missing to a degree.

5581750443_a504358430_b.jpg

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Last night had Sophia in a great Italian-language movie, Marriage Italian Style, and Sophia in a not-so-great English-language movie, Lady L. You might ask, as I once did, "How dull can a movie be when it has Sophia Loren, Paul Newman, and David Niven?" Dull. Really, really dull. Peter Ustinov, a charming actor, doesn't know how to direct. This is less obvious in Billy Budd, where the material is so strong (though, to me, the shaping and pacing seem off), but Lady L is a light, artificial comedy of a kind rarely seen by the 1960s, and it desperately needs someone who could channel Ernst Lubitsch.

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Pickup (1951)

A portly, middle aged railway dispatcher marries a young blonde floozy who thinks he has plenty of dough. He loses his hearing as she is growing bored only to regain it after an accident. He doesn't let her know he can hear again, though, as she starts complaining about him to the young stud who works with the dispatcher. Soon she and the younger man are having an affair, and she starts talking murder.

You've seen it before and you've seen it better. Hugo Haas, who wrote and directed this very low budget film, plays the dispatcher with the too young wife. Beverly Michaels plays the sexy, bored wife who cares only about herself. Haas isn't bad in his role while Michaels has the physical requisites for her part but hardly the acting talent.

Familiar as this kind of story is there is still something that keeps you watching, even if the writing is a far cry from James M. Cain. The message at the end is that Haas should have gotten a puppy instead. I'm not kidding!

No threat here to the memory of John Garfield and Lana Turner.

220px-Pickup_(film)_poster.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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