speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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On 12/2/2018 at 2:09 PM, EricJ said:

...that an actual first-century Judean would have looked much different, more Jewish/middle-Eastern with short dark hair, and yes, rather like Kenny Loggins.

 

I had no idea that Jesus probably looked like Kenny Loggins. So kind of you to share this revelation.

I'm sure Richard Dawkins will add this to his touring repetoire if he speaks again near Liberty University.

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

That's pretty much it--Gritty directors from the 70's, like Sidney Lumet and Sydney Pollack, were down to just generic action dramas by the time they hit retirement in the late 90's and early 00's, and Frankenheimer was down to TNT cable movies, Robert DeNiro in "Ronin", and taking over for that disastrous Marlon Brando "Island of Dr. Moreau".

...It happens, sooner or later.  😥

FRANKENHEIMER also directed an episode of TALES FROM THE CRYPT, which was the cable equivalent of a gig on MURDER SHE WROTE: It was something you did to make the house payment when absolutely *no one* else would hire you. 

...except with a gig on MURDER SHE WROTE there was at least a certain quiet dignity.

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Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

After burning my left eye with shampoo, I settled into a chair with coffee and a tube of Muro 128. With one eye open I tried to watch the above titled movie I had taped from TCM. It's about three hours long and first time through I slept or fast forwarded my way through. Upon reaching the ending, though I anticipated it when she brought the scissors in from the kitchen and time did not allow her to return them, I felt it necessary to go back to look for clues; to hear/read every conversation and not miss anything. The ending came around again and I was not certain that she was having an **** or discomfort I know it's possible for them to look the same. I did notice the often prominent image of herself, her deceased husband and her boy. I also noticed that her client looked exactly like her husband in the photo. I've been googling around and have yet to find this very obvious similarity discussed. Too obvious?

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20 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

That'd be irritating to clean! Especially the area above the stove.  I love her stainless steel water pitcher though.

Gotta dig that plaid pitcher. 

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2 hours ago, Tapestries said:

Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

After burning my left eye with shampoo, I settled into a chair with coffee and a tube of Muro 128. With one eye open I tried to watch the above titled movie I had taped from TCM. It's about three hours long and first time through I slept or fast forwarded my way through. Upon reaching the ending, though I anticipated it when she brought the scissors in from the kitchen and time did not allow her to return them, I felt it necessary to go back to look for clues; to hear/read every conversation and not miss anything. The ending came around again and I was not certain that she was having an **** or discomfort I know it's possible for them to look the same. I did notice the often prominent image of herself, her deceased husband and her boy. I also noticed that her client looked exactly like her husband in the photo. I've been googling around and have yet to find this very obvious similarity discussed. Too obvious?

Probably, the last thing that the film would want to be is - obvious.

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As movies go, Jeanne Dielmann is an excellent graduate seminar paper. Recording it and using the fast forward is much better than seeing it in real time. However, if memory serves, there are occasional showings of Jeanne Dielmann where, just as at Rocky Horror showings, fans bring some of the items Jeanne uses during her daily routine.

John Frankenheimer is one of the very best American directors of the 1960s. Films like The Manchurian Candidate and Seconds look even better now than they did then, wonderful on the big screen. Like so many of his contemporaries, Frankenheimer had drug problems (he has talked about this in interviews), and this harmed his career. He eventually did a lot of television work, including some mini-series which are highly regarded (I am not familiar with them). He also made films like Ronin and The French Connection II, which have notable chase scenes. My take on Reindeer Games is just like Sepiatone's. It's not bad, entertaining enough but not the kind of film one would have hoped for from this very gifted director.

 

 

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Swimming With Men (2018)--Rob Brydon stars as an accountant in the midst of a middle-age meltdown, who meets a group of amateur male synchronized swimmers at a local pool. They recognize him as 'one of their own'--looking for an outlet to escape life's pressures, and invite him into the club:  rule number one of the swim club is don't talk about the swim club.  Another rule is never talk about your private life at the swim club..and that's too bad.  Brydon's life is clearly the thread that winds throughout the film, but we learn precious little about his fellow swim mates, and through a few snippets, it sounds like their back stories might have been more interesting than his.  The club members range in age from a tattooed 20 something (always running from police) to a 70 something widower..with an diverse assortment of characters in between.  Brydon is a rather logical fellow, but leaves his wife after their bratty teen son feeds him false reports of mom having affair/mom wants divorce..mom (Jane Horrocks) seems to be in the dark about Brydon's behavior changes. Change he does..from the fellow who calculated the risk of everything to one willing to work against odds for a competition the team enters. I imagine some will label this sort of a 'Full Monty in the pool'..but it isn't..not quite the camaraderie or comedy.  The sight of the men, none in olympic shape, trying to learn the finer points of water ballet are amusing, but don't look for laugh out loud funny.  The performances by Brydon, Rupert Graves, Adeel Akhtar, Jim Carter, and others was top notch, and I thought some of the camera work (from city scenes that accentuate the 'one-ness' of everyone to the underwater shots) was pretty good.  It's a movie that's hard to classify..I'll just say it's about changes life hands us, changes we make on our own, and taking chances.  Although I wouldn't say it was a must-see, it was an enjoyable film with a few tugs on the heart strings.  source: Cinema apk  Image result for Swimming with Men

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Derailed (2005) Directed by Mikael Håfström written by Stuart Beattie based on James Siegel's novel. 
Stars: Clive Owen, Jennifer Aniston, Vincent Cassel, RZA, and Xzibit. 

A NIPO, Noir In Plot Only, would have made a good neo noir with the use of classic noir visual stylistics and a more streamlined story. It has some nice sequences but others that are way too long. As is it runs an hour and forty-eight minutes.

Reminded me a lot of Pitfall with an extra twist but it spends way too much time on Owen's family home life angle seemed like twenty minutes of shmaltz that it didn't need, plus a sort of epilog that it also didn't need. Too bad 6/10

Derailed Poster

 

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I can't believe it: I was watching a foreign film and my spouse started watching it, too, all the way to the end. He never does that. But the movie was Marriage Italian Style, and that explains a lot. In Italian, at least when directed by Vittorio De Sica, Sophia Loren is a great actress, not merely an astonishingly beautiful woman. The switches from comedy to drama and back to comedy always seem right, and that's very hard to bring off. Again, congratulations to Vittorio De Sica. Marcello Mastroianni is perfect, though his role doesn't have the depth of Loren's character. Aldo Puglisi is fine in a supporting role, and Tecla Scarano is a hoot as Rosalia. The great cinematography is merely an added bonus. Look at the gleaming wood tones in this film: for all the overuse of dark brown in contemporary film and television, no one comes close to using a brown-forward palette this well.

Mastroianni's suits are great, too. I'd love to have suits just like them, especially the medium blue and the oyster-colored ones.

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10 hours ago, kingrat said:

I can't believe it: I was watching a foreign film and my spouse started watching it, too, all the way to the end. He never does that. But the movie was Marriage Italian Style, and that explains a lot. In Italian, at least when directed by Vittorio De Sica, Sophia Loren is a great actress, not merely an astonishingly beautiful woman. The switches from comedy to drama and back to comedy always seem right, and that's very hard to bring off. Again, congratulations to Vittorio De Sica. Marcello Mastroianni is perfect, though his role doesn't have the depth of Loren's character. Aldo Puglisi is fine in a supporting role, and Tecla Scarano is a hoot as Rosalia. The great cinematography is merely an added bonus. Look at the gleaming wood tones in this film: for all the overuse of dark brown in contemporary film and television, no one comes close to using a brown-forward palette this well.

Mastroianni's suits are great, too. I'd love to have suits just like them, especially the medium blue and the oyster-colored ones.

Sophia should have won the Oscar for this film..........

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11 hours ago, kingrat said:

I can't believe it: I was watching a foreign film and my spouse started watching it, too, all the way to the end. He never does that. But the movie was Marriage Italian Style, and that explains a lot. In Italian, at least when directed by Vittorio De Sica, Sophia Loren is a great actress, not merely an astonishingly beautiful woman. The switches from comedy to drama and back to comedy always seem right, and that's very hard to bring off. Again, congratulations to Vittorio De Sica. Marcello Mastroianni is perfect, though his role doesn't have the depth of Loren's character. Aldo Puglisi is fine in a supporting role, and Tecla Scarano is a hoot as Rosalia. The great cinematography is merely an added bonus. Look at the gleaming wood tones in this film: for all the overuse of dark brown in contemporary film and television, no one comes close to using a brown-forward palette this well.

Mastroianni's suits are great, too. I'd love to have suits just like them, especially the medium blue and the oyster-colored ones.

Sophia was at her peak in those sexy Italian comedies of the early '60s, I feel. Working in her native land seemed to bring out the best in the actress, passionate and playful and zesty. Did any actress ever have more natural hearty laughter than Sophia? Seeing her in Yesterday Today and Tomorrow (particularly the third segment in which she played Mara the prostitute) or Boccaccio '70, this is Loren at her zenith. You have to see this Loren to fully appreciate her. The fact that she was one of the world's great voluptuous beauties didn't hurt either.

Somehow whenever she appeared in a Hollywood product some of that great spontaneous joie de vivre that is so much a part of her earthy appeal in her Italian films seems to be missing to a degree.

5581750443_a504358430_b.jpg

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Last night had Sophia in a great Italian-language movie, Marriage Italian Style, and Sophia in a not-so-great English-language movie, Lady L. You might ask, as I once did, "How dull can a movie be when it has Sophia Loren, Paul Newman, and David Niven?" Dull. Really, really dull. Peter Ustinov, a charming actor, doesn't know how to direct. This is less obvious in Billy Budd, where the material is so strong (though, to me, the shaping and pacing seem off), but Lady L is a light, artificial comedy of a kind rarely seen by the 1960s, and it desperately needs someone who could channel Ernst Lubitsch.

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Pickup (1951)

A portly, middle aged railway dispatcher marries a young blonde floozy who thinks he has plenty of dough. He loses his hearing as she is growing bored only to regain it after an accident. He doesn't let her know he can hear again, though, as she starts complaining about him to the young stud who works with the dispatcher. Soon she and the younger man are having an affair, and she starts talking murder.

You've seen it before and you've seen it better. Hugo Haas, who wrote and directed this very low budget film, plays the dispatcher with the too young wife. Beverly Michaels plays the sexy, bored wife who cares only about herself. Haas isn't bad in his role while Michaels has the physical requisites for her part but hardly the acting talent.

Familiar as this kind of story is there is still something that keeps you watching, even if the writing is a far cry from James M. Cain. The message at the end is that Haas should have gotten a puppy instead. I'm not kidding!

No threat here to the memory of John Garfield and Lana Turner.

220px-Pickup_(film)_poster.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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20 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Pickup (1951)

 

Beverly Michaels plays the sexy, bored wife who cares only about herself. Haas isn't bad in his role while Michaels has the physical requisites for her part but hardly the acting talent.

 

She looked a lot different as a brunette about 5 years earlier:

Z2cf0sz.png

But I guess she was no Cleo Moore.

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14 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

220px-Pickup_(film)_poster.jpg

Gotta love the way that tar bar dangles from Beverly's lip.

I’m stealing this line from you. If I hit big, I’ll send you five bucks in the mail.

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I caught most of BLESSED EVENT (1932) last night. 

It is an uneven, but fascinating, pre-code starring LEE TRACY as a verrrrry thinly disguised carbon copy of Walter Winchell. Reminded me a lot of FIVE STAR FINAL From the previous year, which is one of my favorite films of the 30s

I’m sure I won’t remember everything, but there were prohibition jokes, slang galore, 150 words of dialogue a minute, a couple of racial slurs, lots of NU window**– the title refers to Tracy's columnists coy way of saying someone’s been knocked up – and even a reference to then-President Herbert Hoover.

The story ended up wandering quite a bit, I think they were making it up as they went along, but the cast is just superb. It’s a Who’s Who of pre-code Warner Bros. players under the snappy direction of Roy Del Ruth, and even though the story maybe stumbles, it keeps moving as it stumbles.

I really do love Lee Tracy, and I don’t entirely know why, I don’t find him attractive – although I admit that he is not unattractive – and there something about him that tells me he was maybe a ****heel in real life- He certainly plays one well on the screen. But in the end of the day, he’s an amazing actor. He had a three minute long monologue in this movie where he is telling a gangster he is blackmailing exactly what will happen to him if he’s caught and they strap him in to the electric chair, and it’s *amazing* to watch. He spits out the dialogue as fast as Barbara Stanwyck’s typewriter, Seemingly not taking a breath the whole time, and I couldn’t take my eyes off of him.

mbdclal_ec004_h_346x4501.jpg

I really tend to not like actors who are dramatic showboats, but dammit Tracy puts on one hell of a boat show.

Quite frankly had the film been a little bit more focused, he should’ve gotten an Oscar nomination. He’s better than BURT LANCASTER in SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS, Although I readily admit that I do not like that movie.

I’m very sorry Lee Tracy’s career was derailed, even if it was his own damn fault. We really lost out on some great performances that he could’ve given throughout the 1940s and 50s. For example, BOYS TOWN With Spencer Tracy, I can take or leave. BOYS TOWN with LEE Tracy: Oh hell yeah.

He would’ve had those kids running numbers and shaking down suckers for as far as the eye can see.

**I am writing this via voice transcription and it heard the word “innuendo” as “NU window.” It tickled me so, I just left it.

 

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14 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I’m stealing this line from you. If I hit big, I’ll send you five bucks in the mail.

It's OK I stole "tar bar" from Eddie Muller........

I think it was in his Dark City Dames he was talking about an actress "sucking on a tar bar."

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

220px-Pickup_(film)_poster.jpg

Gotta love the way that tar bar dangles from Beverly's lip.

The TAR BAR? You really are into noir, aren't you, cigarjoe.

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9 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

She looked a lot different as a brunette about 5 years earlier:

Z2cf0sz.png

But I guess she was no Cleo Moore.

She makes me think of Jean Hagen in that shot.

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6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

She makes me think of Jean Hagen in that shot.

She does now that you mention it.

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8 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The TAR BAR? You really are into noir, aren't you, cigarjoe.

You should have caught my Westerns phase. 🤠

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

220px-Pickup_(film)_poster.jpg

Gotta love the way that tar bar dangles from Beverly's lip.

Looks more like a cancer stick to me. But then it could also be a ciggy, a coffin nail, or, if you're from Merry Old, a **** (sorry Oh Mighty autocensor, f a g).

Here's one I hadn't heard before but it makes sense: the lady has a gasper hanging from her lips.

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15 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

You should have caught my Westerns phase. 🤠

Bruce had one too.

tenor.gifsunset-1988-james-garner-bruce-willis-bl

 

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