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I Just Watched...

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17 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

BTW Who is R. Kelly? 

HUGE R&B star since ca. 1993. He wrote I BELIEVE I CAN FLY for the SPACE JAM soundtrack, which has become one of the most popular songs of all time. He also wrote a couple others you might know like STEP TO THE NAME OF LOVE and IGNITION, he has also written songs for A LOT of artists and has collaborated with many, even since a video came out of him in 2003 that absolutely showed him in sex acts with a 14 year old girl.

R KELLY's music is the soundtrack of black life in America (in many ways)- something which he has rather craftily exploited as a means of coverage.

i'm not a fan of the music, but that doesn;t matter- the subject matter is compelling enough even if you don't know who he is.

he has been openly abusing and imprisoning young women (many underage) for a looooooooooooooooong time now.

and getting away with it.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

HUGE R&B star since ca. 1993. He wrote I BELIEVE I CAN FLY for the SPACE JAM soundtrack, which has become one of the most popular songs of all time. He also wrote a couple others you might know like STEP TO THE NAME OF LOVE and IGNITION, he has also written songs for A LOT of artists and has collaborated with many, even since a video came out of him in 2003 that absolutely showed him in sex acts with a 14 year old girl.

R KELLY's music is the soundtrack of black life in America (in many ways)- something which he has rather craftily exploited as a means of coverage.

i'm not a fan of the music, but that doesn;t matter- the subject matter is compelling enough even if you don't know who he is.

he has been openly abusing and imprisoning young women (many underage) for a looooooooooooooooong time now.

and getting away with it.

Who would of thunk it?

This is the advantages of watching or listening (as background noise) to TCM and viewing whatever streaming sources you find on line. You don't hear or see a lot of the people magazine fodder nor care about it.

PS don't believe I've ever seen Space Jam either. 

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1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

 

PS don't believe I've ever seen Space Jam either. 

I believe it is manufactured by Smucker's.

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30 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Who would of thunk it?

This is the advantages of watching or listening (as background noise) to TCM and viewing whatever streaming sources you find on line. You don't hear or see a lot of the people magazine fodder nor care about it.

PS don't believe I've ever seen Space Jam either. 

I'm 99.999999999% not interested in modern celebrity "stuff" except when it involves a LONG RUNNING SAGA of controversy and SCANDAL.

Then I am in.

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Racket Busters (1938) - Routine crime drama from Warner Brothers and director Lloyd Bacon. The New York City trucking industry is under the thumb of racketeer John Martin (Humphrey Bogart), but he runs into trouble when driver Denny Jordan (George Brent) decides to fight against the corruption. Also featuring Gloria Dickson, Walter Abel, Allen Jenkins, Henry O'Neill, Penny Singleton, and Oscar O'Shea.

This is reasonably entertaining if not terribly original. Brent doesn't exactly strike me as a truck driver type, but he's not bad in the role. Bogart plays another of his sneering gangsters of the period. The film received the seal of approval from the Commercial Crime Commission.   (6/10)

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

Deception has one of Claude Rains's most flamboyant portrayals, and it's a joy to see a great character actor play his role with such relish (and, quite frankly, give no quarter to his co-stars, even the illustrious Miss Davis). I find a bit of a sadness here, too, though. Rains wouldn't get such juicy roles again. The great performances of his career were pretty well over by the time his contract with Warners ended in 1947.

Well, as Bogie might have said to him, "Well, Louis, we'll always have Casablanca."

And, for Rains fans, Invisible Man and Now Voyager and Robin Hood and Mr Smith Goes to Washington and Notorious and Kings Row and . . .

Sorry, Smokey Joe, but I don't agree that Uncle Claude's roles were over when he twaddled off Warner's lot. There are a couple television roles he played on Hitchcock Presents that are stellar. 

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22 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

Sorry, Smokey Joe, but I don't agree that Uncle Claude's roles were over when he twaddled off Warner's lot. There are a couple television roles he played on Hitchcock Presents that are stellar. 

Smokey Joe? Sorry, I'm not into cigars.

i can't speak to Rains' television work but his film roles were limited. Maybe that's why he went to television. And, let's face it, his films towards the end will probably be better seen than his work with the master on TV.

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On 1/7/2019 at 4:06 PM, sewhite2000 said:

This.

Since the ending has been discussed, here's my interpretation: since it was revealed Paul Douglas was the one who (sort of) ran away, we can assume the message from Jeanne Crain's husband is completely innocuous. He says at the beginning of the movie he'll try to make it, and if he can't, he'll send her a message. The terseness of the message is indeed meant to throw us off momentarily, but once we know (Paul) Douglas is the one who actually was almost an adulterer, Crain's husband is at that moment exonerated.

While the ending does seem ambiguous, with Paul Douglas saying about Crain "She'd have a rough night, she's just a kid" could mean he told her that he ran off as untrue just to have Crain sleep easy that night.  However, the last scene, with Linda Darnell and her husband kissing and dancing, and the champagne glass tipping over, and Addie's voice saying "hey ho!", makes it obvious she didn't get a husband in the end.

 

As for the question about the 4th wife, it was in the script, but was removed before filming began.  Anne Baxter had been slated to play her 

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The Shining Hour (1938) - Melodrama from MGM and director Frank Borzage. Professional dancer Olivia (Joan Crawford) wants to settle down so she marries wealthy Wisconsin farmer Henry (Melvyn Douglas). Henry's sister Hannah (Fay Bainter) disapproves and tries to get other brother David (Robert Young) to end the marriage. Olivia finds her only ally in David's sad wife Judy (Margaret Sullavan), but when David starts falling for Olivia, they all suffer for it. Also featuring Allyn Joslyn, Frank Albertson, Oscar O'Shea, Harry Barris, and Hattie McDaniel.

I didn't warm much to this soap opera drama, although it has its moments. I enjoyed a scene where Crawford beats up a guy trying to force himself on her. Bainter is good as the hissable sister-in-law, and Sullavan was born for this kind of sad-faced role. Crawford sports some bid shoulder pads.   (6/10)

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Spawn of the North (1938) - Action and drama, with fish, from Paramount Pictures and director Henry Hathaway. Alaskan fish-cannery owner Jim (Henry Fonda) reconnects with old pal Tyler Dawson (George Raft), a seal hunter. They both have to deal with the illegal shenanigans of boat captain Red Skain (Akim Tamiroff) and his crew who keep looting the community's salmon traps. Jim also finds himself in a love triangle, as he pines for recently-returned gal Diane (Louise Platt), while hotel owner Nicky Duval (Dorothy Lamour) yearns for Jim from afar. Also featuring Lynne Overman, Fuzzy Knight, Vladimir Sokoloff, Duncan Renaldo, John Wray, Henry Brandon, and John Barrymore.

The subject matter isn't something that's frequently covered in cinema, and the cast is unexpected, as well. Raft isn't bad, while Fonda is very good, easing into the earnest, noble hero mold that served him well in his career leading up to the war. One of the most notable things about the movie is the presence of John Barrymore as the hopelessly drunk father of Platt's character. Barrymore's standing had sunk so low by this point that he's listed fifth in the credits. The movie was awarded an honorary Oscar for the sound effects and visual effects (there's a lot of rear projection on display).    (7/10)

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I tried to watch Won't You Be My Neighbor, the documentary about Mr. Rogers, but I really couldn't get into it, though it seemed like a decent tribute. I watched about 1/2 hour.

I'm from the Miss Frances/Ding Dong School generation. I think Mr. Rogers actually got a lot of his inspiration from Miss Frances.

 

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Suez (1938) - Historical epic from 20th Century Fox and director Allan Dwan. In the mid-19th century, Ferdinand de Lessops (Tyrone Power) is ordered by Emperor Napoleon III (Leon Ames) to travel to Egypt and oversee French operations there. Ferdinand comes up with the idea to build the Suez Canal, but must overcome many obstacles to see it a reality. Also featuring Loretta Young and Annabella as love interests, Nigel Bruce, Henry Stephenson, Joseph Schildkraut, J. Edward Bromberg, Sidney Blackmer, Sig Ruman, Miles Mander, George Zucco, Rafaela Ottiano, Victor Varconi, and Maurice Moscovitch as Mohammad Ali.

Epic in scale and production, if not length (98 minutes), this is a highly-fictionalized account of the events portrayed, but it's entertaining, nonetheless. Power and Annabella were married not long after filming, and their chemistry is evident. Miles Mander appears as Disraeli, while Varconi plays Victor Hugo. The movie received three Oscar nominations, for Best Cinematography, Best Score, and Best Sound.   (7/10)

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37 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

 Maurice Moscovitch as Mohammad Ali.

 

 

Did he do his rope-a-dope?

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38 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Suez (1938) -

Haven't seen this in years... is this the film with a giant sandstorm?

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7 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

Haven't seen this in years... is this the film with a giant sandstorm?

Yes, that was the big finale.

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Swing Your Lady (1938) - Rural wrestling musical comedy from Warner Brothers and director Ray Enright. Wrestling promoter Ed (Humphrey Bogart) arrives in a backwards Missouri town with his champion wrestler, the dim-witted Joe (Nat Pendleton). Ed tries to arrange a local match, and hits on the idea of having Joe wrestle large local gal Sadie (Louise Fazenda), only plans go south when Joe falls in love with her. Also featuring Frank McHugh, Penny Singleton, Allen Jenkins, Daniel Boone Savage, the Weavers, and Ronald Reagan.

If someone had described this movie to me, I wouldn't have believed that it was real. Add Bogart and Reagan as actors in it and it becomes even more unbelievable. The humor is dopey, the wrestling scenes silly, and the performances fitting. The songs are mainly during a protracted square dance scene. People often mention The Return of Doctor X as Bogart's low point. I thought this was much worse.    (4/10)

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Blackwell's Island (1939) - Crime drama from Warner Brothers and director William McGann. Reporter Tim Haydon (John Garfield) and policeman Terry Walsh (Dick Purcell) try to take down crime boss Bull Bransom (Stanley Fields), even if it means Tim has to go behind bars to do it. Also featuring Rosemary Lane, Victor Jory, Morgan Conway, Granville Bates, Anthony Averill, Peggy Shannon, Charley Foy, Wade Boteler, Leon Ames, and Milburn Stone.

This quickie B programmer was filmed before Four Daughters made Garfield a star, so WB had Michael Curtiz shoot some more scenes with the new star before they released this. Garfield is good, but neither Purcell nor Lane make much of an impression. Longtime screen heavy Fields gets to play the chief bad guy for a change, and he gives it his obnoxious all. This is no one's finest moment, but I've seen worse.   (6/10)

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2 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

Haven't seen this in years... is this the film with a giant sandstorm?

Yes, Suez is the film with a giant sandstorm--and Loretta Young wearing a dress about equally big.

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Devils of Darkness (1965) - British horror from Planet Films and director Lance Comfort. American-residing-in-England Paul Baxter (William Sylvester) vacations in France where he runs into trouble with a satanic cult led the immortal vampire Count Sinistre (Hubert Noel). Featuring Tracy Reed, Carole Gray, Diana Decker, Rona Anderson, Peter Illing, Gerard Heinz, Marianne Stone, and Eddie Byrne.

This was marketed as the first British vampire film set in modern times. It doesn't make the proceedings anymore exciting, though. Noel does not make for a "Sinistre" vampire, and Sylvester is a bland hero. The women are more interesting, especially Tracy Reed as a red-headed model, and Carole Gray as a gypsy vampire bride. Some gruesome stuff is implied, but never explicitly shown, such as a woman getting a torch in the face, and a man being stabbed in the throat.   (5/10)

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Swing Your Lady (1938) - If someone had described this movie to me, I wouldn't have believed that it was real. Add Bogart and Reagan as actors in it and it becomes even more unbelievable. The humor is dopey, the wrestling scenes silly, and the performances fitting. The songs are mainly during a protracted square dance scene. People often mention The Return of Doctor X as Bogart's low point. I thought this was much worse.    (4/10)

Before video, the only place I'd ever heard this movie described was in Michael Medved's original "Fifty Worst Films", and no, I didn't believe it was real.

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Brexit: The Uncivil War (2019) was on television in Britain last week and it was quite good.  The parallels between the Brexit vote and the 2016 Presidential election in America are very apparent.  It is essentially the story of how a campaign that was given absolutely no chance in the beginning goes on to win ... and it is frightening.  Cumberbatch who plays Dominic Cummings the mastermind behind the Leave campaign starts by tossing all of the important Leave politicians and traditional tactics in the waste bin.  Even Nigel Farage and his immigrant fear-mongering is just a joke sideshow.  Enter Cambridge Analytica and an untapped 3 million votes that have not been registered in any polls - yet.  It isn't until the final weeks of the campaign before the Remain side realize that 20 years worth of people's 'fears and hatreds' have moved them to the Leave side.  We see normal people in case study groups become utterly divisive and angry by the time the vote approaches.  Micro-targeting and insidious messaging wins the day for Leave.  

One funny bit has a woman confronting Boris Johnson with a Leave leaflet that states 70 million Turks are set to move to England if they become part of the EU.  Johnson notes that this is the entire population of Turkey but does nothing to correct the message.  Cummings also alters his campaign slogan from "take control" to "take back control."  It is a significant change that taps into people's beliefs that their hopes and dreams have been taken away from them.  Where else have we heard this?

Recommended if it appears on HBO in America.

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BRUTE FORCE (1947)

in spite of the pedigree of everyone involved, the soufflé don’t quite rise on this one (for me.)

The flashbacks and female characters are worked into the story quite uncreatively and the ending is marred by some really badly dated special effects- some flames clumsily superimposed over a guard tower during the finale are especially bad. There’s also some *really* obvious edits in the middle of static shots that were done to protect the actors from the gunfire.

I never noticed Burt Lancaster had some small acne scars. Yvonne DeCarlo is GORGEOUS And Charles Bickford makes a surprisingly effective tough guy. I am pretty sure a very skinny James with more is also in this.

SIR LANCELOT- the ***hole troubadour from I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE has a small role in this. He sings his lines island style with a guitar, and I hate him.

 

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Blackwell's Island (1939)

One of the curses of Garfield's career was that this gifted, sensitive actor had so much second rate material given to him during his Warners contract years. The number of good films he made for that studio during his early years there is depressingly limited. Garfield did much of the best work of his career once he was free of that studio. Sadly, though, time was running out for him.

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14 hours ago, Swithin said:

I tried to watch Won't You Be My Neighbor, the documentary about Mr. Rogers, but I really couldn't get into it, though it seemed like a decent tribute. I watched about 1/2 hour.

There's a PBS special tribute for Fred Rogers that I saw a few years ago, I want to say it was a QED production. It was perfect-a balance of historical facts presented in a perfect story arc with TV show footage & insightful comments & interviews.

I was shocked, shocked to see WONT YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR was made. Why? This story was already covered very well.

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