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I Just Watched...

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IO (2019) - Science fiction drama from Netflix, Mandalay Pictures, and director Jonathan Helpert. A global biological apocalypse has occurred on the Earth, rendering the atmosphere in all but the most elevated regions poisonous. Most of the surviving humanity has fled to a space station orbiting Jupiter's moon Io, where they prepare for the greater journey to the next inhabitable star system. Meanwhile back on Earth, Sam (Margaret Qualley) continues the work of her father (Danny Huston), attempting to find a way to make humans immune to the air's toxicity and thus make the world livable again. Her solitary labors are interrupted by the arrival of another survivor, Micah (Anthony Mackie), who is on his way to rendezvous with the last ships leaving the planet for Io. Now Sam must decide whether to stay on Earth and continue her work, or leave her home forever.

This sci-fi film is a quiet, character-driven mood piece. Anyone looking for space-opera-style action and adventure, or thrilling suspense, will most likely be bored to death. I enjoyed it for what it is, though, as it reminded me of a lot of literary SF, which is often more internal and not concerned with special effects and bombast. The performances are good, with Qualley as awkward as someone with little human interaction in their lives would likely be. This isn't a movie that's going to loom large in the memory, but I found it agreeable enough.  (7/10)

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Background to Danger (1943) - Wartime intrigue from Warner Brothers and director Raoul Walsh. Traveling American salesman Joe Barton (George Raft) gets caught up in a plot by German agents to foment discord between neutral Turkey and the Soviet Union. Various factions want a package that he was given by an agent, and Barton has trouble figuring out who is friend and who is foe. Also featuring Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, Brenda Marshall, Osa Massen, Turhan Bey, Willard Robertson, Kurt Katch, Pedro De Cordoba, Nestor Paiva, Paul Porcasi, Frank Puglia, Frank Reicher, and Steven Geray.

This has its moments, and I always like seeing Lorre and Greenstreet, but there's not enough original material here to make this very memorable. Raft is only passable as the hero, and Marshall is one of the more unremarkable leading ladies of the period. Still, director Walsh keeps things moving.   (7/10)

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Background to Danger (1943) - Wartime intrigue from Warner Brothers and director Raoul Walsh. Traveling American salesman Joe Barton (George Raft) gets caught up in a plot by German agents to foment discord between neutral Turkey and the Soviet Union. Various factions want a package that he was given by an agent, and Barton has trouble figuring out who is friend and who is foe. Also featuring Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, Brenda Marshall, Osa Massen, Turhan Bey, Willard Robertson, Kurt Katch, Pedro De Cordoba, Nestor Paiva, Paul Porcasi, Frank Puglia, Frank Reicher, and Steven Geray.

This has its moments, and I always like seeing Lorre and Greenstreet, but there's not enough original material here to make this very memorable. Raft is only passable as the hero, and Marshall is one of the more unremarkable leading ladies of the period. Still, director Walsh keeps things moving.   (7/10)

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I agree with that 7 \ 10 rating but if WB had cast either Bogie or Garfield instead of Raft and Lupino instead of Marshall the film would have likely been better.

 

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The Bells Go Down (1943) - British wartime firefighting drama from Ealing Studios and director Basil Dearden. A trio of men, Tommy (Tommy Trinder), Bob (Philip Friend) and Sam (Mervyn Johns), join the Auxiliary Fire Service, the firefighting service responsible for minimizing the damage from the German Blitz over London. Also featuring James Mason, Finlay Currie, Philippa Hiatt, Meriel Forbes, Beatrice Varley, and William Hartnell.

The film follows the three main characters, each of whose stories have a difference tone: Tommy's tale is comedic, with him training a racing dog on the side; Bob is a newlywed worried about supporting and protecting his wife and impending child; and Sam is an inveterate crook on the run from the cops. Mason is their by-the-book commander. I liked seeing Hartnell, billed as "Billy" in the credits, a couple of decades before starring in the first Doctor Who series. This movie isn't bad, but I liked the documentary Fires Were Started, made around the same time and on the same subject, much more.   (6/10)

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Marshall is one of the more unremarkable leading ladies of the period.

 

After seeing a dull, stone faced Brenda Marshall in a number of films during her Warners years (she's a particularly frigid leading lady in The Sea Hawk), I was always surprised that she produced a fun, sexy performance in Curtiz's Captains of the Clouds, opposite Cagney. Shot in Technicolor the lady even comes off as rather vivacious, for a change, the one film exception in a series of bland performances. Must have been that great northern Ontario Trout Lake location shooting that brought out the best in the lady.

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Kings Go Forth (1958)

Frank Sinatra plays an Army lieutenant in the World War II campaign in Southern France, who gets a new radio man in sergeant Tony Curtis, who's serving in order to escape his idle rich past.  One day on leave he meets Natalie Wood and falls in love with her, until she reveals her dirty little secret, which is that she's as black as Susan Kohner in Imitation of Life.  At that point Tony starts putting the moves on her but unceremoniously dumps her because he's a jerk.  Frankie and Tony have to resolve their personal issues by going on a mission behind enemy lines....

This one has muddled character motivations, a flawed script (Natalie's late black father never gets a name, even when Mom is talking lovingly about him), and a screwed-up ending.  I was almost hoping for Troy Donahue to show up, but then I realized that Natalie playing a phony black was good practice for playing a phony Puerto Rican a few years later in West Side Story.  5/10.

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Butcher, Baker, Nightmare Maker aka Night Warning (1981)* - Psychological horror film from Royal American Pictures and director William Asher. Unbalanced maiden aunt Cheryl (Susan Tyrrell) has cared for her nephew Billy (Jimmy McNichol) since the boy was three and his parents died in a car accident. Now that Billy is turning 18 and looking to move away for college, Cheryl is acting increasingly bizarre, leading to violence. Also featuring Julia Duffy, Bo Svenson, Marcia Lewis, Britt Leach, Steve Eastin, and Bill Paxton.

I was expecting another routine early 80's slasher flick but instead this is an unusual, although not entirely successful, psycho-drama with some hack'n'slash flourishes near the end. Tyrrell is as unhinged as usual, and your enjoyment may be tempered by your tolerance for her over-the-top histrionics. I recall McNichol being a teen heartthrob back in the late 70's, but not much else. He's a terrible actor, at least in this, and I'm not too surprised he quickly faded into obscurity. Julia Duffy, later a co-star on Newhart, was nearly 30 when this was filmed, yet believably plays the 20-year-old McNichol's high school sweetheart. I really enjoyed seeing the late lamented Bill Paxton in one of his earliest roles (credited as "William Paxton") as a school bully.

The strangest aspect of this film concerns Bo Svenson as the hard-nosed cop investigating the incidents in the film. He becomes convinced that there's a conspiracy by local homosexual men, and he won't consider any other explanation. At first I thought it was going to be another instance of throw-away homophobia that was not uncommon in genre films of the time. However, it becomes the driving focus of the Svenson character, with his personal hang-ups about gay men making him irrational. Added to his character being a short-tempered jerk to every other person he encounters, and it's one of the more unsavory acting jobs of his career. In the end I have a feeling that the filmmakers were sympathetic to the gay characters (there are a few, and not just in Svenson's mind), but it's handled in such a way as to make it confused, to say the least. I thought this movie was one of the more unique in a sub-genre that was glutting screens at that time, and would recommend it to fans of off-beat cinema. Others, especially those repelled by screen violence, should probably avoid it.   (6/10)

*This movie had a one-city premiere in 1981 before being released nationally in February of '82.

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43 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Tyrrell is as unhinged as usual, and your enjoyment may be tempered by your tolerance for her over-the-top histrionics.

I met Susan Tyrrell in the early 1980s. Odd experience indeed.

 

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45 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I met Susan Tyrrell in the early 1980s. Odd experience indeed.

 

If you met her argumentative and deep in her cups in a bar with Stacey Keach buying her drinks I guess it was.

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44 minutes ago, TomJH said:

If you met her argumentative and deep in her cups in a bar with Stacey Keach buying her drinks I guess it was.

It was at a party following a screening of Tales of Ordinary Madness. She said, "Do you want to hang out with me?"  

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6 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I agree with that 7 \ 10 rating but if WB had cast either Bogie or Garfield instead of Raft and Lupino instead of Marshall the film would have likely been better.

 

Though a very wooden actor Raft despite his crime biddies aka: "Bugsy" Siegel-(l906-l947) of which his was 1 & only person at his funeral in now called HOLLYWOOD FOREVER, CEM  I think that may be main reason he's yet to be a STOTM?  (TRIVIA: I've told many times since 2001 on here & elsewhere, got it out of CAGNEY'S autobiography. Besides himself, Raft was the actual toughest guy in HOLLYWOOD. Edward G. Robinson-(l893-l973) though a powerful actor vs George-(matter of fact to 2 detested each other, so much so that filming a good (***) 1941 pic MANPOWER, one of them moved other actor too fast & Raft flattened EDWARD G, right on set & more fun trivia; Next time you see the excellent bio BUGSY (l99l) (made $49m.) of course w/*BEATTY  he meets Virginia Hill she was a bit extra on MANPOWER. & though another flat-(though was strong in about 3 pictures) think he made 50, not certain FMR. PRESIDENT RONALD (Wilson) REAGAN-(l9ll-2004) to e fair still deserves that tcm honor. as far as THE WARNER BROS. GANGSTERS & VIP STUDIO TOUR-(without peer now left standing & more than superb!)-(visited the sets 2 & 1/2hrs in '99)

 

(FINAL NOTE: For some reason Raft-(QUESTION, ANYONE KNOW HE'S NATIONALITY?) At any rate he died virtually penniless) at age 84 in 1980, though like tons of movie stars of that era, like *J. CRAWFORD, she shaved 4yrs from her birth date? Raft, some say was born in 1904 or something???)  (A TIP: Besides "MANPOWER" check out the hilarious bit in Jerry Lewis & him dancing in the hilarious 1961 LADIES' MAN)  PLUS, I once write a neat thing about 10yrs again here-(different handle again, not my fault) I WAS (SPENCER) & NOT JUST (SHANNON)!!! THANKS TO TCM TOO, YOU DELETED MY PARTIAL HISTORY & EVERYTHING I WROTE UNDER THAT HANDLE (had almost 4,000 posts)

SORRY, back to final Raft / *Bogie item  WHO SAW 1980's "MAN WITH BOGART'S FACE?" (l980) (**1/2_) It was Raft's final film & Robert Scacchi portrayed the legendary & AFI s #1 all-time male movie star *HUMPHREY (Deforest) BOGART-(l899-l957)  HECK, EVEN BIG LUG MIKE MAZURSKI'S IN IT> WROTE ARTICLE/.POST ABOUT A FULL EVENING OF A *"BOGART FILM FESTIVAL"-(lots more in that post)  & FOR THOSE THAT WANT, I'LL TRY & DO IT AGAIN

 

THANX & REMEMBER OSCAR NOMS ARE TUESDAY MORNING

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Butcher, Baker, Nightmare Maker aka Night Warning (1981)* - Psychological horror film from Royal American Pictures and director William Asher. Unbalanced maiden aunt Cheryl (Susan Tyrrell) has cared for her nephew Billy (Jimmy McNichol) since the boy was three and his parents died in a car accident. Now that Billy is turning 18 and looking to move away for college, Cheryl is acting increasingly bizarre, leading to violence. Also featuring Julia Duffy, Bo Svenson, Marcia Lewis, Britt Leach, Steve Eastin, and Bill Paxton.

I was expecting another routine early 80's slasher flick but instead this is an unusual, although not entirely successful, psycho-drama with some hack'n'slash flourishes near the end. Tyrrell is as unhinged as usual, and your enjoyment may be tempered by your tolerance for her over-the-top histrionics. I recall McNichol being a teen heartthrob back in the late 70's, but not much else. He's a terrible actor, at least in this, and I'm not too surprised he quickly faded into obscurity. Julia Duffy, later a co-star on Newhart, was nearly 30 when this was filmed, yet believably plays the 20-year-old McNichol's high school sweetheart. I really enjoyed seeing the late lamented Bill Paxton in one of his earliest roles (credited as "William Paxton") as a school bully.

The strangest aspect of this film concerns Bo Svenson as the hard-nosed cop investigating the incidents in the film. He becomes convinced that there's a conspiracy by local homosexual men, and he won't consider any other explanation. At first I thought it was going to be another instance of throw-away homophobia that was not uncommon in genre films of the time. However, it becomes the driving focus of the Svenson character, with his personal hang-ups about gay men making him irrational. Added to his character being a short-tempered jerk to every other person he encounters, and it's one of the more unsavory acting jobs of his career. In the end I have a feeling that the filmmakers were sympathetic to the gay characters (there are a few, and not just in Svenson's mind), but it's handled in such a way as to make it confused, to say the least. I thought this movie was one of the more unique in a sub-genre that was glutting screens at that time, and would recommend it to fans of off-beat cinema. Others, especially those repelled by screen violence, should probably avoid it.   (6/10)

*This movie had a one-city premiere in 1981 before being released nationally in February of '82.

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YOU SCOOPED ME NEVER SAW IT?

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5 hours ago, Fedya said:

Kings Go Forth (1958)

Frank Sinatra plays an Army lieutenant in the World War II campaign in Southern France, who gets a new radio man in sergeant Tony Curtis, who's serving in order to escape his idle rich past.  One day on leave he meets Natalie Wood and falls in love with her, until she reveals her dirty little secret, which is that she's as black as Susan Kohner in Imitation of Life.  At that point Tony starts putting the moves on her but unceremoniously dumps her because he's a jerk.  Frankie and Tony have to resolve their personal issues by going on a mission behind enemy lines....

This one has muddled character motivations, a flawed script (Natalie's late black father never gets a name, even when Mom is talking lovingly about him), and a screwed-up ending.  I was almost hoping for Troy Donahue to show up, but then I realized that Natalie playing a phony black was good practice for playing a phony Puerto Rican a few years later in West Side Story.  5/10.

O WOW FEDYA, you really got me with this one on a myriad of levels!  1st of all NATALIE-(looong story), & my #2 all-time idol *FRANCIS (Albert) SINATRA! Not a great picture, but do you agree a fine one? (***) Mr. Curtis really portrayed a weasel here huh?  Due to those being it it I've had it on vhs for about 20yrs or better. (TRIVIA: strangely sole pic the duo did together, because it was around here in '58 she started hanging out w him & a lot, despite her being 23yrs his jr Whenever you see MY LOVE smoking a cigarette in a long black holder, that was her *CHAIRMAN era. Until 1 day when he said something in her era & she ran out of a lg party crying. She has just gotten married to RJ-(Wagner (l957-62) but her attraction to him was really in 62 onward a couple yrs.  AFTER ALL *SINATRA WAS UNDER THE TREE-(which WAGNER) recently had chopped down, all her fans flowers removed & none of her beloved pennies anymore & dig this, there was a nice bench you got sit at within 2-3ft of her, well, my mother & I visited there in April of 1999 Madre staid out on it entire visit, saying it just felt comfortable staying near NATALIA, now also gone on Wagner's rules!!!  BUT, *FRANCIS WAS THERE AS PALLBEARER & MANY MORE HEAVYWEIGHTS IN TINY "WESTWOOD, PARK" & SOME SHOTS SHOW *C. WALKEN ALSO THERE, BUT STAYED WAY IN BACGROUND   thanx 

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Any fans out there notice that big lug, good actor & sometime truly nice guy ALDO RAY-(l926-9l)

being on the network quite a bit lately, KUDOS to the network

'"PAT & MIKE" (l952-MGM) (as Hucko) (4 stars!) Even stealing a couple bits from the legenary *TRACY & *K. HEPBURN)

:"MEN IN WAR" (l957) (***1/2) (opposite Robert Ryan)

"NAKED AND THE DEAD" (l958) (strong ***) (another 1 he walked away with)

"GOD'S LITTLE ACRE" (l958) (strong ***) (NOTE: When Aldo made the awful '68 "G. BERETS" he said in CI/FOGA mags he wasn't impressed with the legendary *JOHN "THE DUKE" WAYNE & even refused to call him "DUKE?") (He was firm in saying he thought Ryan was robbed of not just an Oscar,nom but the statue its self for "GOD'S LITTLE ACRE"

& another silent per by him was in a pretty fine 1967 Western starring:*HENRY FONDA, "WELCOME TO HARD TIMES" (barely ****) Ray steals this show too, as a big bully & without any dialogue

My mom kinda' always liked ALDO, though he was much younger of course. & in PHILLY due to not only his films but his football playing-(was injured) They either had an annual parade when he was still with us, or may still do it 

 

SEND YOU OWN ALDO RAY views???  WHATS THE ONE HE DID W OOPS, JUST RECALLED IT 1952's "THE MARRYING KIND" (*** to ***1/2) (TRIVIA/FUN/FACTS: *Quentin Tarentino calls this among his all-timers!)

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This must’ve been on TCM UNDERGROUND...

I watched a 1981 movie that was ostensibly called BUTCHER, BAKER, NIGHTMARE MAKER although I have to note that the credits to the movie were OBVIOUSLY, BADLY, HILARIOUSLY added years later as a way to repackage this (They look like something from a late 80s TV movie)

it was originally called NIGHT WARNING. although to be honest that title is even less appropriate.

Susan Tyrrell stars as a deranged spinster who is raising and sexually manipulating her 17-year-old nephew & commits a series of murders to keep him close. It’s surprisingly watchable, 100% due to Tyrrell. I  have never seen FAT CITY, but several posters here have raved about her performance in it and I can understand that. She’s a very interesting actress, kind of like a likable, oddly alluring Shelley Duvall. 

She is ******g BANANAS in this. 

BILL PAXTON Has a small role.

It’s supposed to be taking place In Arizona but looks an awful lot like Ventura County to me. The house that most of the action takes place in looks like the one in GILMORE GIRLS.

John Waters probably LOVED this.

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(I see your review of BBNMM now, Lawrence, and we are simpatico. Thanks also for mentioning the interesting BO SVENSON/ gay angle. )

Was the lead REALLY that bad an actor? I didn’t notice, he was cute and he looked really good in a wife beater. (Don’t you love how I am a merciless critic in all respects EXCEPT when a handsome guy is involved? I’ve learned to embrace this weakness in my defenses)

 

Damn I was **** Julia Duffy lived. She annoyed the **** out of me in everything she ever did. She did make a completely believable teenager though. Nice **** too- If you’re into that sort of thing

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Brexit (2019)

This film is ultimately about the downside of ubiquitous communication devices and platforms, in that your social media data can be harvested not only to sell you hats and hamburgers, but to sell you misinformation literally tailored to you for political campaigns as well.

This is the tale of the 2016 referendum on Brexit- the vote in the UK to leave the European Union. Specifically it is a portrait of one man, Dominic Cummings (Benedict Cumberbatch), the director of the "Leave" campaign, or the campaign to exit the EU. I wasn't sure why the side story of the Cummings marriage and pregnancy was included at first, but later it becomes clear that Cummings would have come across as a statistician/political version of House, M.D. if that humanizing story was not present.

Cummings enlists the help of a tiny Canadian IT company - Aggregate IQ - to do data mining of social media for the "Leave" campaign, and they come up with three million potential Brexit voters that the "Remain" campaign (campaign to remain in the EU) knows nothing about. Cummings' strategy involves tenets of Sun Tzu's "Art of War" , specifically forcing the "Remain" campaign to "fight in the darkness", or wherever the "Leave" campaign chose them to fight. Specifically Britain has an equal time policy when it comes to broadcasting political messages. So the Remain campaign would have a Nobel prize winning economist explaining the downside to leaving the EU in complex terms, and then the Leave side would talk about millions of Turks possibly emigrating to the UK, forcing the Remain side to waste time on trying to debunk that message.

It is up the viewer as to whether this tale is humorous or frightening, I think it is a little bit of both. On the frightening side you have political campaigns becoming the equivalent of the evil presence in the 1982 film Poltergeist - it knows what scares you. On the humorous side you see the frustration of the Remain side as the Leave side will simply not play by "the rules". And kudos to the guy playing Boris Johnson. He looked just like him.

I'm only knocking one point off this almost perfect film because it had quite a bit of stuff that the viewer was just assumed to know. For example it kept talking about "MPs". In the US that is "Military Police". In the UK it is "Members of Parliament". I should not have to search Wikipedia in order to completely understand a film, but overall that is a minor complaint.  Highly recommended. 9/10

Source: HBO

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Crazy House (1943) - Manic comedy mayhem from Universal Pictures and director Edward F. Cline. Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson star as Olsen & Johnson, a comedy duo headed to Hollywood to make their film follow-up to their previous hit Hellzapoppin'. However, due to the chaos they caused on their last picture, they have trouble securing financing or co-stars, which leads to even more madness and trouble. Also featuring Cass Daley, Patric Knowles, Martha O'Driscoll, Thomas Gomez, Leighton Noble, Percy Kilbride, Hans Conried, Billy Gilbert, Edgar Kennedy, Franklin Pangborn, Shemp Howard, Evelyn Ankers, Turhan Bey, Joseph Crehan, Lon Chaney Jr., John Hamilton, Charles Middleton, Gene Roth, Gale Sondergaard, Pierre Watkin, and "introducing" Allan Jones, Johnny Mack Brown, Leo Carrillo, Nigel Bruce, Alan Curtis, Andy Devine, Robert Paige, and Basil Rathbone.

High-spirited, irreverent, mindlessly silly, this is a different sort of screen comedy for the time, with dozens of physical, verbal and sight gags per scene. Olsen & Johnson themselves are only somewhat funny, but they work well as the eye of the hurricane of the goofiness around them. There are a lot of songs performed, both by the above-mentioned cast as well as a number of bands of the day, including those of Count Basie, Ramsay Ames, and others. This won't be for all tastes, but I enjoyed it, and see it as the spiritual antecedent to future shows like Laugh-In.   (7/10)

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24 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Crazy House (1943) -

The bit with Rathbone and Bruce is priceless.

I wish TCM would show these Olsen and Johnson films. I enjoyed them all as a kid. Some of them pop up on youtube now and then, but the prints are usually lousy. My parents saw the pair in a live show on Broadway, I think in the early 1940s.

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Government Girl (1943) - Wartime rom-com from RKO and director Dudley Nichols. Aircraft manufacturing chief Ed Browne (Sonny Tufts) is newly arrived in an overcrowded Washington DC. He clashes with his new secretary "Smokey" Allard (Olivia de Havilland), but the two naturally start to fall for each other. Also featuring Anne Shirley, James Dunn, Paul Stewart, Agnes Moorehead, Jess Barker, Harry Davenport, Sig Ruman, George Givot, Jane Darwell, Barbara Hale, John Hamilton, Warren Hymer, Art Smith, Ian Wolfe, Lawrence Tierney, and Una O'Connor.

Although not without a few cute moments, this is pretty much a misfire, with de Havilland, reportedly unhappy about being assigned this picture, turning in a overdone performance. The large supporting cast is a welcome sight, and I liked Agnes Moorehead as a society doyen, but this comes across as the lesser version of several similar films of the period.    (5/10)

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Calvin:

Bogie did a review of Brexit about a week ago (back on page 621 if you're doing the 25 posts a page thing) and I linked to Dominic Cummings' own thoughts on the referendum from 2017.  I'd think it's more accurate to say that Cummings didn't play by "convention", not by "the rules" since the latter might imply that his campaign was breaking laws.  And the "rules" were structured so as to heavily favor Remain.  I still like the quote from Cummings that I put in my response, so I'll quote it again:

Most of the MPs we dealt with were not highly motivated to win and lacked extreme focus, even those who had been boring everybody about this for decades. They sort of wanted to win but they had other priorities. They were very happy having dinner parties and gossiping. They were very happy coming to meetings with people they thought were important. This wasted enormous amounts of time as we had to create a string of Potemkin committees for people to attend while the core team actually did the campaign, then reinvent them as people became convinced that there were other secret meetings that they were being excluded from.

As a third-party voter, I see so much of that in American politics.

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26 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Calvin:

Bogie did a review of Brexit about a week ago (back on page 621 if you're doing the 25 posts a page thing) and I linked to Dominic Cummings' own thoughts on the referendum from 2017.  I'd think it's more accurate to say that Cummings didn't play by "convention", not by "the rules" since the latter might imply that his campaign was breaking laws.  And the "rules" were structured so as to heavily favor Remain.  I still like the quote from Cummings that I put in my response, so I'll quote it again: 

 

 

As a third-party voter, I see so much of that in American politics.

No,  I did not look back and see Bogie's review. Thinking last night was the American premiere of Brexit, I thought it was safe to write one. Sorry about that. I put "the rules" in quotation marks just so people would not think that Campaign Leave was breaking any laws, it was just that they were breaking conventional rules of engagement as seen by Campaign Remain. Thanks for the link to Dominic Cummings' thoughts on the referendum. They were enlightening.

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Princess O'Rourke (1943) - More wartime romantic comedy, from Warner Brothers and writer-director Norman Krasna.  Sheltered European noblewoman Princess Maria (Olivia de Havilland) takes a plane trip that gets diverted to Washington DC, where she sets out on a tour incognito. She also begins a romance with airline pilot Eddie O'Rourke (Robert Cummings), with he little knowing of her royal blood. Also featuring Charles Coburn, Jack Carson, Jane Wyman, Harry Davenport, Gladys Cooper, Minor Watson, Nan Wynn, Curt Bois, Ray Walker, Julie Bishop, Nana Bryant, Frank Puglia, and Douglas Spencer.

I've read about this movie's infamously troubled production for years but had never actually watched it until today. It's not without some charm, and the first half feels like a rough draft for the later Roman Holiday in many ways. As is often the case in these rom-coms, I liked the "B" couple, Jack Carson & Jane Wyman in this case, as much if not more than the leads. Krasna made his directing debut here, and he won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for it, too.   (6/10)

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Riders of the Deadline (1943) - B western from United Artists and director Lesley Selander. Texas Ranger "Hopalong" Cassidy (William Boyd) leaves the service in disgrace after his pal is accused of working with a gang of smugglers. Hoppy, with help from regular pals "California" Carson (Andy Clyde) and Jimmy Rogers (Jimmy Rogers), works to clear his name and bring down the bad guys. Also featuring Frances Woodward, William Halligan, Richard Crane, Anthony Warde, Hugh Prosser, Herbert Rawlinson, and "Bob" Mitchum as Nick Drago.

The fiftieth in the long-running series of programmer westerns featuring Boyd as Cassidy, this is interchangeable with a dozen others, and promises to stay in the memory like smoke in a windstorm. I watched it for Mitchum, who has a substantial part as the main bad guy henchman.   (5/10)

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4920113_l5.jpg

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14 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Riders of the Deadline (1943)

4920113_l5.jpg

"Oh, I hate working on deadlines..."  

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