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I Just Watched...

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The Sky's the Limit (1943) - Musical romance from RKO and director Edward H. Griffith. Ace fighter pilot Fred Atwell (Fred Astaire) is brought back stateside to do a morale-boosting tour. He chafes under the confines of the itinerary, so he goes on the lam and quickly falls for photographer Joan Manion (Joan Leslie), who is also the object of the affections of  her boss Harriman (Robert Benchley). Also featuring Robert Ryan, Elizabeth Patterson, Marjorie Gateson, Neil Hamilton, Paul Hurst, Peter Lawford, Clarence Muse, and Eric Blore.

This is the kind of reassuring, distracting fluff that was common during the war years, a mash-up of familiar tropes thrown together in an easily-digestible manner and meant to offer fleeting comfort on the homefront. They weren't even trying too hard, either; I mean, Fred and Joan are playing Fred and Joan, fer cryin' out loud. There's also a slight creepiness to the 18-year-old Leslie being pursued by the 44-year-old Astaire and the 53-year-old Benchley, but that's Hollywood for ya. The movie managed to nab two Oscar nods, for Best Score-Musical (Leigh Harline), and Best Song ("My Shining Hour").   (6/10)

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They Met in the Dark (1943) - British mystery thriller from General Film Distributors and director Karel Lamac. Royal Navy officer Richard Heritage (James Mason) is court-martialed and drummed out of the service after his girlfriend turns out to have been an Axis spy. Heritage sets out to track her and her compatriots down, but when she ends up dead, the body is discovered by Laura Verity (Joyce Howard). She and Heritage end up joining forces to catch the culprits. Also featuring Tom Walls, Phyllis Stanley, Edward Rigby, Ronald Ward, David Farrar, Karel Stepanek, Finley Currie, Anthony Dawson, and Patricia Medina.

I enjoyed this off-kilter intrigue flick. It has an unusual comic streak running through it, and the performers are all enthusiastic. The script is far from classic, and the direction is uneven, but it entertained me.  (7/10)

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The Lounge People (1992)

IMDB.com states that this movie was directed and written by: Bradd Saunders but it is very much a Buck Henry movie in all regards. It is his humor and his view of the world and his manner of erasing the line between reality and sanity.

He is a genius eccentric living on an island with his wife and household staff where he is creating his own version of Moby Dick while waiting to die. I feel that it is wrong to say that his marriage is dysfunctional as the wife is making it work and BD Wong is the houseboy she is presently working on.

This movie is absurd on many levels. That is what makes it so very wonderful!

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Young and Willing (1943) - Comedy from Paramount Pictures/United Artists* and director Edward H. Griffith. Six aspiring stage performers, Norman (William Holden), George (Eddie Bracken), Tony (James Brown), Kate (Susan Hayward), Dottie (Martha O'Driscoll), and Marge (Barbara Britton), all share an apartment to save on expenses. They have to keep their co-habitation a secret though, so as to not upset the morals of the day and risk immediate eviction. Their situation is upended by the arrival of cousin Muriel (Florence MacMichael) who wants to spill the beans on their arrangement, and playwright Arthur Kenny (Robert Benchley), a major Broadway figure who resided in the same apartment building in his younger years, and who has returned to recharge his creative batteries. Also featuring Mabel Paige, Paul Hurst, Jay Fassett, Olin Howland, Fay Helm and Billy Bevan.

I found this more irritating than amusing. MacMichael uses an incredibly annoying cutesy baby voice that grates on the nerves. The screenwriters nor the director succeeded in opening up the action much from its stage origins, and as such the majority of the film transpires in a single room. Future big-time movie stars Holden and Hayward are fine in their roles, but neither really displays much in the way of screen magnetism. Bracken gets to do most of the silliest shtick, naturally. This reminded me of a prototype version of Friends.   (5/10)

*I read that this was one of a number of Paramount-produced films that were subsequently sold to United Artists for distribution, due to some sort of wartime issue, the details of which I'm unaware of.

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Voyage of the Damned (1976)

MPW-39018

Watching Amazon Prime is starting to become like the "Storage Wars" of overlooked movies:  Some independent distribution company will buy back packages of expired studios, license them to Amazon who'll show anything, and searching Prime can become like browsing the back shelves of that favorite mom-and-pop VHS store.  Just this week--this week--one distributor dug up a package of late-60's to late-70's Lord Grade ITC "All-star international epics!", bringing up "March or Die", "The Tamarind Seed", "The Cassandra Crossing", and many of those other little-pictures-of-the-cast All-Star International Epics that disappeared after "Raise the Titanic" sank them out of favor along with the studio.  (And yes, if I'd just been patient a few months, I wouldn't have had to look that one up on YouTube...Darn.)

I'd been curious, as the studio had floated this one as their big Oscar-bait of the year before it pretty much dropped off the face of the earth, and it's easy to see why--For the first hour, in the story of a thousand 1939 German refugees relocated to Cuba as a propaganda stunt, we get so many of the standard "Wartime passengers of destiny" subplots, those who didn't know their history would think it was a rewritten Titanic epic, and the ship was going to sink.  The story, of course, is that a corrupt, bureaucratic Cuba didn't want them, a 30's isolationist US wouldn't take them, and the doomed passengers might ultimately be sent back to Germany.  That should be drama (and provides plenty of Trump parallels), but it's oddly uninvolving--Compared to the less realistic Wartime Passengers of Destiny in Robert Wise's The Hindenburg that same year, that one had a better feel for prewar tensions hiding in luxury class..."Hindenburg" made you dream of traveling on luxury zeppelin, "Voyage" just makes you feel like you're on a long trip with a rude staff.  Director Stuart Rosenberg plays the Jewish-history angle too subjectively, he feels as if the audience is already on his side from the beginning, like "Schindler's List Goes to Havana".  70's-era Faye Dunaway plays her usual ruthless hysterics, Max Von Sydow is the sympathetic ship captain, and Ben Gazzara gets the noble speeches as the government representative, but most of it falls apart in the over-the-top climaxes.  Malcolm McDowell looks a bit confused at having to play a good character as a teen steward who finds romance (when he helps foil a German-intelligence ploy, watch the Alex deLarge bad-boy come back out again) and Orson Welles shows up as a Cuban bureaucrat, but with his strange 70's-Welles delivery, you're genuinely not sure whether he's trying for "casual raconteur", or whether he's befuddled by his own lines because he was at the career point where he couldn't remember them anymore.

I find I'm digging up better movies on Prime than on Netflix, but it's not a good situation for streaming when most of it's dumpster-diving for good big-budget movies that show up there by accident.

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Colt Comrades (1943) - More "B" western action from United Artists and director Lesley Selander. Hopalong Cassidy (William Boyd), along with his two pals California (Andy Clyde) and Johnny (Jay Kirby), buys interest in a ranch owned by brother & sister Lin (George Reeves) and Lucy Whitlock (Teddi Sherman). They have to fend off crooked rival Jeb Hardin (Victor Jory). Also featuring Douglas Fowley, Herbert Rawlinson, Earle Hodgins, Russell Simpson, Jack Mulhall, Dewey Robinson, and "Bob" Mitchum as Dirk Mason.

This, the 47th Hoppy screen adventure, was slightly better than most of the others that I've seen. Maybe it was seeing Hoppy teamed up with Superman, and to battle Victor Jory, no less. Mitchum plays another bandit, but he's not in this one very long.   (6/10)

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RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET (2018) *watched in 2018* Score: 7.75/10 

Starring: Sarah Silverman, John C. Reilly, Gal Gadot, Taraji P. Henson, Jack McBrayer, Jane Lynch, Bill Hader. 

The sequel to 2012's "Wreck it Ralph" was definitely enjoyable, but managed to drag on for what seemed like forever in some scenes. 

Vanellope is starting to really feel how monotonous her racing game is, and yearns for something more. Her wish is granted when her game gets broken and she needs to go to the internet for the replacement part. She goes to the internet with her best friend, Ralph, and they quickly learn some of the functions of the Internet (they really only scratch the surface). 

The pair travels to ebay, and, as they have zero clue how the bidding process works, start blurting out extremely high numbers, and are then tasked with the chore of collecting such a high sum. They make the trip to a dangerous game called "Slaughter Race," in which their goal is to steal Shank's ( protagonist of the game) race car. There are gamers prepared to pay them for the acquisition of the car. They fail to get away with the car, but Vanellope is completely taken with the unpredictability that the game offers. The truth comes out while, conveniently, Vanellope is having a heart to heart with Shank, and Ralph overhears. He is then torn between keeping Vanellope at home where he thinks she belongs, and allowing her to be happy in a new game. 

I was impressed by the animation, as I often am with Disney/Pixar projects. And, although Vanellope sometimes annoys me, I enjoyed the conflicts her character underwent in this movie. I would have to say my favorite parts were when the princesses were present. I tend to pay close attention to the instrumental music used in animated movies. I think I've trained my ear to listen for recurring themes/motifs due to being a fan of musical theatre. During one of the princess scenes, there was an instrumental medley of their individual themes, and my ears found it delightful. Speaking of music, Disney legend Alan Menken wrote an original song for Vanellope to sing, entitled "A Place Called Slaughter Race." Trust me, the song makes sense in context. 

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Destination Inner Space (1966) - Terrible water-logged science fiction from United Pictures and director Francis D. Lyon. US Navy submarine expert Commander Wayne (Scott Brady) is ordered to embark to the high-tech underwater SeaLab run by Dr. LaSatier (Gary Merrill). It seems the SeaLab has been reporting sightings of a strange craft in the vicinity and the government wants Wayne to determine if it's new type of Soviet sub. Instead it's an alien craft which lets loose an amphibious monster to try and destroy the SeaLab and all of its occupants. Also featuring Sheree North, John Howard, Mike Road, Wende Wagner, William Thourlby, Biff Elliott, Roy Barcroft, and James Hong.

This comes across like a cheaper, dumber, longer episode of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. There's lots and lots of scuba diving footage, so if watching people swim is your thing, this might be up your alley. It's kind of sad to see the cast of aging stars looking haggard and drenched, reciting terrible dialogue and fighting a flabby fish-monster. I have to wonder if a young James Cameron watched this, inspiring his later film The Abyss, which bares some resemblance to this.    (4/10)

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"The Godless Girl" (1929) this is my second time watching it, been a while.  Brutal guard sure was lucky, a converted atheist is responsible for saving his life. She got the message.  God works in mysterious ways. 

 

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"The Man On The Rock" (1938) movie short.  Lol an early conspiracy theory...Napoleon didn't die on the island of St. Helena in 1821, his double Francois Eugene Robeaud did. :lol:

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24 minutes ago, hamradio said:

"The Godless Girl" (1929) this is my second time watching it, been a while.  Brutal guard sure was lucky, a converted atheist is responsible for saving his life. She got the message.  God works in mysterious ways. 

 

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This is one of the first classic movies I ever saw and is a really underrated Cecil B. DeMille film. Very moving, religious film, almost as much as his later Ten Commandments.

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13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Princess O'Rourke (1943) - More wartime romantic comedy, from Warner Brothers and writer-director Norman Krasna.  Sheltered European noblewoman Princess Maria (Olivia de Havilland) takes a plane trip that gets diverted to Washington DC, where she sets out on a tour incognito. She also begins a romance with airline pilot Eddie O'Rourke (Robert Cummings), with he little knowing of her royal blood. Also featuring Charles Coburn, Jack Carson, Jane Wyman, Harry Davenport, Gladys Cooper, Minor Watson, Nan Wynn, Curt Bois, Ray Walker, Julie Bishop, Nana Bryant, Frank Puglia, and Douglas Spencer.

I've read about this movie's infamously troubled production for years but had never actually watched it until today. It's not without some charm, and the first half feels like a rough draft for the later Roman Holiday in many ways. As is often the case in these rom-coms, I liked the "B" couple, Jack Carson & Jane Wyman in this case, as much if not more than the leads. Krasna made his directing debut here, and he won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for it, too.   (6/10)

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To LawrenceA, or is it really T.E., Lawrence-(Mr. 0'Toole) (TRIVIA: Just before the best movie magazine ever PREMIERE-(1987-2002) went under buddy?  It monthly conducted in house polls & in a huge story voted Peter 0'Toole's-(l932-2014) per in *LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (l962-British) as The Single Greatest Performance By Anyone in Cinematic History" unquote. Ever hear of this amazing & not altogether off the money story? Certain if you dig into PREMIERE'S mags online you'd locate iy friends. Do you alsoi get mainstream magz down yhere or not buddy?

As for to me the ok (**1/2) PRINCESS O'ROURKE she was marvelous & quite cute again, but no great shakes Think it did snag a script nomination though. & look in your Oscar history book, or books it was nommed for it's writing. & always truly liked Liza\\matter but something I've written about since joining TCM, the first time was about 2001 under another alias & then yes later under another (Spencer) But, almost 4-got prior to the alias/handle I had one titled (myidolspoencer) But, disliked that one & now, thanks to TCM's editing team, my fmr almost 4,000 Pooosts have easily are gone bye, bye-(LAWRENCE) certain you know where all that work went pals, please let me know???

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6 hours ago, EricJ said:

Voyage of the Damned (1976)

MPW-39018

Watching Amazon Prime is starting to become like the "Storage Wars" of overlooked movies:  Some independent distribution company will buy back packages of expired studios, license them to Amazon who'll show anything, and searching Prime can become like browsing the back shelves of that favorite mom-and-pop VHS store.  Just this week--this week--one distributor dug up a package of late-60's to late-70's Lord Grade ITC "All-star international epics!", bringing up "March or Die", "The Tamarind Seed", "The Cassandra Crossing", and many of those other little-pictures-of-the-cast All-Star International Epics that disappeared after "Raise the Titanic" sank them out of favor along with the studio.  (And yes, if I'd just been patient a few months, I wouldn't have had to look that one up on YouTube...Darn.)

I'd been curious, as the studio had floated this one as their big Oscar-bait of the year before it pretty much dropped off the face of the earth, and it's easy to see why--For the first hour, in the story of a thousand 1939 German refugees relocated to Cuba as a propaganda stunt, we get so many of the standard "Wartime passengers of destiny" subplots, those who didn't know their history would think it was a rewritten Titanic epic, and the ship was going to sink.  The story, of course, is that a corrupt, bureaucratic Cuba didn't want them, a 30's isolationist US wouldn't take them, and the doomed passengers might ultimately be sent back to Germany.  That should be drama (and provides plenty of Trump parallels), but it's oddly uninvolving--Compared to the less realistic Wartime Passengers of Destiny in Robert Wise's The Hindenburg that same year, that one had a better feel for prewar tensions hiding in luxury class..."Hindenburg" made you dream of traveling on luxury zeppelin, "Voyage" just makes you feel like you're on a long trip with a rude staff.  Director Stuart Rosenberg plays the Jewish-history angle too subjectively, he feels as if the audience is already on his side from the beginning, like "Schindler's List Goes to Havana".  70's-era Faye Dunaway plays her usual ruthless hysterics, Max Von Sydow is the sympathetic ship captain, and Ben Gazzara gets the noble speeches as the government representative, but most of it falls apart in the over-the-top climaxes.  Malcolm McDowell looks a bit confused at having to play a good character as a teen steward who finds romance (when he helps foil a German-intelligence ploy, watch the Alex deLarge bad-boy come back out again) and Orson Welles shows up as a Cuban bureaucrat, but with his strange 70's-Welles delivery, you're genuinely not sure whether he's trying for "casual raconteur", or whether he's befuddled by his own lines because he was at the career point where he couldn't remember them anymore.

I find I'm digging up better movies on Prime than on Netflix, but it's not a good situation for streaming when most of it's dumpster-diving for good big-budget movies that show up there by accident.

A well-made (***) but no "POSEIDON ADVENTURE" 

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4 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET (2018) *watched in 2018* Score: 7.75/10 

Starring: Sarah Silverman, John C. Reilly, 

 

Glad you included the photo. I got excited thinking there was a movie with those two in the leading roles.

Eh, a cartoon using their voices is not "starring" the actors, to me. I want to see their faces acting too.

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

"The Man On The Rock" (1938) movie short.  Lol an early conspiracy theory...Napoleon didn't die on the island of St. Helena in 1821, his double Francois Eugene Robeaud did. :lol:

Ooh, another Carey Wilson short.  (He's the one that did the terrible Nostradamus shorts at MGM and a bunch of similar Z-grade stuff.)

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Glad you included the photo. I got excited thinking there was a movie with those two in the leading roles.

Eh, a cartoon using their voices is not "starring" the actors, to me. I want to see their faces acting too.

Come to think of it, I also would be interested in seeing the two of them in a live action film together. Huh. 

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13 hours ago, EricJ said:

Voyage of the Damned (1976)

MPW-39018already on his side from the beginning, like "Schindler's List Goes to Havana".  70's-era Faye Dunaway plays her usual ruthless hysterics, Max Von Sydow is the sympathetic ship captain, and Ben Gazzara gets the noble speeches as the government representative, but most of it falls apart in the over-the-top climaxes.  Malcolm McDowell looks a bit confused at having to play a good character as a teen steward who finds romance (when he helps foil a German-intelligence ploy, watch the Alex deLarge bad-boy come back out again) and Orson Welles shows up as a Cuban bureaucrat, but with his strange 70's-Welles delivery, you're genuinely not sure whether he's trying for "casual raconteur", or whether he's befuddled by his own lines because he was at the career point where he couldn't remember them anymore

 

very, very good review.

i'm surprised though that you did not mention LEE GRANT and KATHARINE ROSS (the former was Oscar-nominated for her part in this, the year after she won for SHAMPOO) and I seem to recall Ross maybe winning a Golden Globe (I remember her being good and very sexy in her part as a Hooker, but very little else about the film.)

I also recall ORSON wearing a cravat and a cape in his role here- this was during his cravat and cape period, I think....

 

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F.B.I. Girl (1951)

Entertaining crime drama, done on a limited budget, but with a cast of familiar faces.

A state governor with a shady past desires to run for the Senate but wants his fingerprint card in the files of the F.B.I. to disappear. Waiting to do the job for him is sleazy henchman Raymond Burr. He gets the prints lifted from a file by an F.B.I. clerk but when underlings of his then cause the car crash death of that clerk they fail to get the fingerprint card. F.B.I. agents Cesar Romero (CESAR ROMERO?) and George Brent are called in upon the case.

At a 74 minute running time this film moves at a fairly zippy pace. The film further benefits from the presence of noir icon Audrey Totter as another F.B.I. clerk and girlfriend of lobbyist Tom Drake, who is associated with Burr. Drake asks her to lift the prints, as well, but she is uncomfortable with the request and reports it to Romero and Brent.

Burr, in his pre-Perry Mason days, is a good, glowering villain who dominates the screen in any of his scenes. It's strange seeing Romero, who I associate with a lot of Fox musicals as well as playing the Cisco Kid, as an F.B.I. agent but he does okay in his role. Still, in the film's climax, when he is in a helicopter with a machine gun I still kept thinking, "CESAR ROMERO?"

George Brent fans will be a little disconcerted to see him in an uninteresting role, with limited opportunities and dialogue, as, essentially, Romero's flunky. Romero is clearly the F.B.I. agent in charge in this film.

There is an odd scene in which Romero, while waiting for Totter to return home, sits on a couch between her two air head giggling blonde roommates (one of them buxom Joi Lansing). They are watching a couple of comics on television, with Romero looking distinctly uncomfortable doing this. The comics are Tom Noonan and Peter Marshall (the future Hollywood Squares host) doing an Abbott and Costello-style schtick and it has nothing to do with the film's crime story. It's a sequence which goes on for a minute or two that was clearly chiselled into the production, for some reason. Noonan or Marshall were friends of the film's producer?

The poster artwork below is completely deceiving. Audrey Totter's character is a clerk in the film who neither brandishes a gun nor wears any form fitting outfit of that nature. It still makes for a pretty good poster anyway for a fun crime time waster.

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2.5 out of 4

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Between Two Worlds (1944) - Fantasy drama from Warner Brothers and director Edward A. Blatt. Passengers on an ocean voyage begin to suspect that something about their journey may be amiss. Starring John Garfield as a cynical reporter, Paul Henreid and Eleanor Parker as desperate couple, Sydney Greenstreet, Sara Allgood, George Tobias, George Coulouris, Faye Emerson, Dennis King, Isobel Elsom, Gilbert Emery, and Edmund Gwenn.

I'm fairly certain that I saw part or all of this movie many years ago, but it was back before I started keeping track, so I wasn't sure and decided to watch it again to be certain. The sense of deja vu wasn't helped by the fact that I watched the 1930 version Outward Bound last year. I think I may have liked that earlier version better; the more primitive film and sound techniques accentuated the otherworldliness of the piece. However, I still liked this one quite a bit. Greenstreet is a terrific choice for his particular (spoiler) role. I'd have trouble thinking of two movie stars more different than Leslie Howard and John Garfield, each of whom played the reporter roles in the two versions, but they were both very good. Garfield's NY tough guy cynicism brings a welcome reality to the proceedings. Setting the events during the then-current WWII background also adds some more layers to the tale.   (7/10)

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The Eve of St. Mark (1944) - WWII drama from 20th Century Fox and director John Stahl. A group of army draftees, including Quizz West (William Eythe), Thomas Mulveroy (Michael O'Shea), and Francis Marion (Vincent Price), try to manage their private lives and personal fears at the outbreak of the war. Also featuring Anne Baxter, Ruth Nelson, Ray Collins, Henry Morgan, Stanley Prager, Robert Bailey, John Archer, Blake Edwards, Arthur Hohl, and Dickie Moore.

This was based on a play, and the stage roots show in the static set-pieces and frequent monologues. The film's second half, set in the Philippines, is better than the first, with an exciting finale. I watched this for Vincent Price, an unlikely casting choice in an army film, but he's outstanding as a loquacious southern gentleman with a large vocabulary. I wish this movie was more readily available, as I think this is one of Price's more amusing performances from the '40s.   (7/10)

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Between Two Worlds (1944)

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Between Two Worlds has a terrific musical score by Erich Wolfgang Korngold which the composer regarded as the favourite of his career.

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Rewatching The Remains of the Day yesterday, I was reminded by how good it really was.  Only 26 years on, it blasts many of the most praised Oscar films since it was made out of the water. Anthony Hopkins delivered a true tour de force.

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Follow the Boys (1944) - Wartime morale booster musical from Universal Pictures and director A. Edward Sutherland. Former vaudeville dancer Tony West (George Raft) finds Hollywood stardom when he teams with Gloria Vance (Vera Zorina), but their success is interrupted by the outbreak of WWII. Tony devotes his energy to organizing USO shows for troops both stateside and overseas, but it causes strain with his partner. Also featuring Charley Grapewin, Grace McDonald, Charles Butterworth, Ramsay Ames, Elizabeth Patterson, Regis Toomey, and George Macready. Also appearing are dozens of film and radio stars as themselves, including Marlene Dietrich, Orson Welles, Jeannette MacDonald, Donald O'Connor, Peggy Ryan, Dinah Shore, the Andrews Sisters, Sophie Tucker, Arthur Rubinstein, Martha O'Driscoll, Maxie Rosenblum, W.C. Fields, and many more.

I've stated before that I'm a sucker for these WWII-era all-star revue type pictures. They're positive, up-tempo looks at the tastes of the time, and the best-foot-forward showmanship is a delight. I thought the same of this one, as the Raft-Zorina plotline is a big nothing, but the various music performances are very enjoyable. Outside of the songs, I also liked a stage-magic performance by Welles with an assist from Dietrich. Fields makes his final film appearance, looking sick and old, performing some of his old billiards gags, a nice callback to his first film appearance in 1915's Pool Sharks.

Today being MLK Day, I also have to mention the film's subtle but poignant looks at then-current race relations. During a big confab featuring execs and stars from all of the major Hollywood studios, we see various stars stand up and pledge to help out in the USO-style efforts. At one point we see Louise Beavers declare that she'll do what she can to help, and I noticed that all of the black actors and actresses were segregated into their own section of the auditorium, separate from the white attendees. Later, Raft's character is approached by a black soldier asking for entertainment for his fellow troops. Raft vows to do so, and we cut to Louis Jordan and his band performing for an all-black regiment. Unlike the previously seen white troops, who were seated on bleachers in an amphitheater setting, the black soldiers are all seated on the ground, with the band performing in the back of a pickup truck. It's a stark reminder of the advancements made since this period. This scene does contain one of the film's best moments, though, when it begins to rain and Raft jumps up into the back of the truck and does some exuberant dance moves. The movie earned one Oscar nod, for Best Song ("I Walk Alone"), performed by Dinah Shore.    (7/10)

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

George Brent fans will be a little disconcerted to see him in an uninteresting role,

They're not used to him in bland roles?  :D

 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The sense of deja vu wasn't helped by the fact that I watched the 1930 version Outward Bound last year. I think I may have liked that earlier version better; the more primitive film and sound techniques accentuated the otherworldliness of the piece.

I also really like the 1930 Outward Bound, which also took the daring tack of using sound effects as a plot device as the Leslie Howard character especially is trying to figure out where all these sounds are coming from.

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