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I Just Watched...

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42 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Loved One (1965)

A dark comedy about death. Robert Morse plays an English poet who comes to America to visit his uncle (John Gielgud) who works in Hollywood movies. After the uncle dies, Morse meets many strange characters when planning the funeral.

I thought the film was a bit uneven, the beginning was slow and subtle, even Liberace was restrained in his cameo role! The second half became more weird and wild, I was laughing much more during these scenes. Rod Steiger plays funeral cosmetician Mr Joyboy who has a gluttonous mother for the most hilarious scenes. Jonathan Winters shows up in dual role and a very young Paul Williams (later famous as a singer/songwriter in the 1970s) as a kid genius who makes his own rockets. 

Unlike his later "The Hotel New Hampshire", this strange movie turned into a wholly exhilirating and consistently entertaining excursion into a true and genuine "film original". 

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4 minutes ago, rayban said:

Unlike his later "The Hotel New Hampshire", this strange movie turned into a wholly exhilirating and consistently entertaining excursion into a true and genuine "film original". 

TONY RICHARDSON did THE HOTEL NEW HAMPSHIRE?

Might check it out, while I don't really "get" THE LOVED ONE, I liked BLUE SKY and I really, really liked TOM JONES a lot (if it had never won the Oscar it would still be raved about as a great cult classic.)

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6 minutes ago, rayban said:

Unlike his later "The Hotel New Hampshire", this strange movie turned into a wholly exhilirating and consistently entertaining excursion into a true and genuine "film original". 

Yes, Tony Richardson had won the Oscar for "Tom Jones" two years before, so I guess he was able to get away with making this one.

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3 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Yes, Tony Richardson had won the Oscar for "Tom Jones" two years before, so I guess he was able to get away with making this one.

actually, I think he won in March, 1964 (for his 1963 film TOM JONES) and THE LOVED ONE came out in 1964, he might've even been in the middle of filming or had maybe even wrapped THE LOVED ONE when he won.

I think he was just naturally nuts and was gonna be a nut no matter what.

(see also Ken Russell)

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

TONY RICHARDSON did THE HOTEL NEW HAMPSHIRE?

Might check it out, while I don't really "get" THE LOVED ONE, I liked BLUE SKY and I really, really liked TOM JONES a lot (if it had never won the Oscar it would still be raved about as a great cult classic.)

Believe it or not, concerning "The Loved One", the movie is, for the most part, faithful to the book.

Christopher Isherwood did the original adaptation.

Much later, they brought in "a swinger" - Terry Southern - to update it.

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2 minutes ago, rayban said:

Believe it or not, concerning "The Loved One", the movie is, for the most part, faithful to the book.

Christopher Isherwood did the original adaptation.

Much later, they brought in "a swinger" - Terry Southern - to update it.

You know what else though?

I don't "get" EVELYN WAUGH, tried reading BRIDESHEAD REVISITED and couldn't get past the notion of having a Butler in college.

I do love the fact that he was married to a woman also named EVELYN and they used to refer to one another as "HE-Evelyn" and "SHE-Evelyn" though

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

actually, I think he won in March, 1964 (for his 1963 film TOM JONES) and THE LOVED ONE came out in 1964, he might've even been in the middle of filming or had maybe even wrapped THE LOVED ONE when he won.

I think he was just naturally nuts and was gonna be a nut no matter what.

(see also Ken Russell)

The fact that Tony Richardson was a gay man - well, it is such an integral part of the movie version.

Also, Evelyn Waugh's "gayness" is such an integral part of the book.

 

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You know what else though?

I don't "get" EVELYN WAUGH, tried reading BRIDESHEAD REVISITED and couldn't get past the notion of having a Butler in college.

I do love the fact that he was married to a woman also named EVELYN and they used to refer to one another as "HE-Evelyn" and "SHE-Evelyn" though

Only a gay man could have written "Brideshead Revisited".

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18 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Half a day. She did PARACHUTE JUMPER at 3:45.

LOL.

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A Bell for Adano (1945)  -  7/10

220px-A_Bell_for_Adano.jpg

 

War picture about US troops led by John Hodiak taking command of a liberated Italian town. I enjoyed seeing the collection of Italian-American character actors such as Luis Alberni, Henry Armetta, Fortunio Bonanova, Gino Corrado, and Eduardo Ciannelli. I watched this for Gene Tierney, who sports platinum blonde hair, but she ended up being the weakest part of the movie.

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28 minutes ago, rayban said:

Only a gay man could have written "Brideshead Revisited".

Dang it, you’re making me want to try to re-read it.

edit- Or to re-try reading it, I should say. Made it to page 92 on the previous attempt.

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31 minutes ago, rayban said:

The fact that Tony Richardson was a gay man - well, it is such an integral part of the movie version.

Also, Evelyn Waugh's "gayness" is such an integral part of the book.

 

With a name like Evelyn how could he not be? LOL.

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Waugh’s 1930 novel Vile Bodies is a great read. It’s about the lives of upper-class British university students.  These young aristocrats, dubbed Bright Young Things by the British press, enjoyed making mischief and living the high life (in more ways than one). It was a gay-friendly subculture. In 2003 a film called Bright Young Things came out, based on Vile Bodies, and featuring a who’s who of up and comers: James McAvoy, Emily Mortimer, David Tennant and Michael Sheen to name a few.  I liked the film very much.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

A Bell for Adano (1945)  -  7/10

220px-A_Bell_for_Adano.jpg

 

War picture about US troops led by John Hodiak taking command of a liberated Italian town. I enjoyed seeing the collection of Italian-American character actors such as Luis Alberni, Henry Armetta, Fortunio Bonanova, Gino Corrado, and Eduardo Ciannelli. I watched this for Gene Tierney, who sports platinum blonde hair, but she ended up being the weakest part of the movie.

How did Tierney look as a blonde?

Fortunio Bonanova was actually born in Spain, though he played so many Italians I'd just as soon say he was one. He was a riot as "Uncle Bozzo" in an episode of The Abbott and Costello Show. The poor fellow died after sustaining a head injury from a fall at the Shrine Auditorium in L.A. in 1969. An opera singer, he was attending the San Francisco Opera Company's performance of "Madame Butterfly" at the time.

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4 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

How did Tierney look as a blonde?

Fortunio Bonanova was actually born in Spain, though he played so many Italians I'd just as soon say he was one. He was a riot as "Uncle Bozzo" in an episode of The Abbott and Costello Show. The poor fellow died after sustaining a head injury from a fall at the Shrine Auditorium in L.A. in 1969. An opera singer, he was attending the San Francisco Opera Company's performance of "Madame Butterfly" at the time.

I wasn't sure if one or more may have been Spanish, although I've seen them all playing Italian characters many times (and Spanish and Mexican and virtually every other European and South American ethnicity). I also read that A Bell for Adano was the last filmed role for Henry Armetta, although one more previously filmed role was released afterward.

As for blonde Gene Tierney:

8003301323_8542d9b15d_b.jpg

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17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

 

As for blonde Gene Tierney:

8003301323_8542d9b15d_b.jpg

Not bad

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Hotel Berlin (1945)  -  7/10

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A common complaint about films of the 1940's is that there isn't enough Peter Lorre. This is especially egregious in films in which he is credited, such as this one. What's there is choice Lorre, though. Raymond Massey was good, too.

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Gene Tierney would still qualify as "not bad" even if she had gone for a Yul Brynner look.

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The Man in Half Moon Street (1945)  -  6/10

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Nils Asther stays young by transplanting glands. I saw the 1959 remake The Man Who Could Cheat Death first. This earlier version is a bit too stagy for my tastes, but I was impressed by the aging effects done in-camera late in the film.

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Wonder Wheel (2017) Written and directed by Woody Allen. Cinematography by Vittorio Storaro. Stars, Justin Timberlake, Juno Temple, Kate Winslet, and Jim Belushi.

Kate Winslet in Wonder Wheel (2017) 

Coney Island Neo Noir - Sort of A Streetcar Named Desire meets the Honeymooners and The Sopranos shot in a kaleidoscope of carnival colors. It's offsetting at first but grows on you. The Acting is top notch. A lot of fun to watch. Thanks Woody. 8/10

 

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Maybe it belongs in the Films of 2018 thread, but I just watched The Old Man and the Gun. If it does end up being Robert Redford's final film, it will be a good swan song. He plays a bank robber with an inordinately high number of instances of breaking out of jail, and concerns his latest crime spree, the man trying to capture him (Casey Affleck), his partners in crime (Danny Glover and Tom Waits), and his romance with a widow (Sissy Spacek). Despite the title and the bank robberies, this is not a film with any violence, indeed most of this is a gentle low-key crime tale take, and its a very amiable watch with Redford at his most laid-back and charming (there is even a clip of him in 1966's The Chase toward the end of the film). And his scenes with Sissy Spacek are a joy and they have a great on screen chemistry.

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I was always a big fan of this movie.   I was entering my senior year of high school when this movie came out.  My uncle, a cop, took me to see In the Line of Fire.   I loved it then and love it now.  I followed his footsteps.

Clint is good in this and has some really good funny lines in this one.  

But Malkovich steals the show as a former CIA assassin hellbent on killing the president.   Love this movie.  One of those movies on my list that whenever it pops up on TV its easy to watch.  

In the Line of Fire.jpg

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This Love of Ours (1945)  -  5/10

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Sleep-inducing soap opera featuring Merle Oberon and charisma-vacuum Charles Korvin. I watched it for Claude Rains, who has little to work with but still turns in a fine performance. This was remade in '56 as Never Say Goodbye with Rock Hudson and Cornell Borchers.

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Where Do We Go From Here? (1945)  -  6/10

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This is a bizarre, absurdist, Technicolor musical comedy fantasy with Fred MacMurray as a guy who can't get drafted into the military. He accidentally frees a genie from a bottle, but when Fred wishes to get drafted, the genie instead sends him back in time to the Revolutionary War, then to Columbus discovering the Americas, then to the New Amsterdam era of NYC. Featuring songs from Ira Gershwin & Kurt Weill. I watched it for Anthony Quinn, who plays a slick Indian chief who "sells" Manhattan to Fred. This is weird and silly, yet pleasantly amusing and off-beat, and it's only 78 minutes long.

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