speedracer5

I Just Watched...

17,214 posts in this topic

16 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Where Do We Go From Here? (1945)  -  6/10

5847467%5D,sizedata%5B850x600%5D&call=ur

 

This is a bizarre, absurdist, Technicolor musical comedy fantasy with Fred MacMurray as a guy who can't get drafted into the military. He accidentally frees a genie from a bottle, but when Fred wishes to get drafted, the genie instead sends him back in time to the Revolutionary War, then to Columbus discovering the Americas, then to the New Amsterdam era of NYC. Featuring songs from Ira Gershwin & Kurt Weill. I watched it for Anthony Quinn, who plays a slick Indian chief who "sells" Manhattan to Fred. This is weird and silly, yet pleasantly amusing and off-beat, and it's only 78 minutes long.

The operatic aria "Nina, Pinta and the Santa Maria" is my favorite part of the film. I wish more of Weill's works had been adapted to film. "Happy End" is set in 20s gangster Chicago and would have made a good classic Hollywood "some Like It Hot" style film.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Bride Wore Boots (1946)  -  6/10

MV5BNWMwMjMyMGMtY2ZiOC00MzFlLTg4MTEtY2M4

Another "horsey" movie. Horse-lovin' Barbara Stanwyck is married to horse-not-lovin' Bob Cummings. They decide to separate when Diana Lynn keeps trying to jump Bob's bones. Featuring a blonde Natalie Wood sharing a scene with a guy in a Santa suit. As bad as this movie sounds, it still contains some funny moments, but not many. Featuring one of the worst movie posters that I've ever seen.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scream of Fear (1961)--Quite possibly the best of the Hammer films, it's labeled as 'horror', but is more of a classic psychological thriller.  The plot revolves around Susan Strasberg's visit to her father's estate after a decade of estrangement.  Her physical condition (in a wheelchair, unable to walk after a horseback riding accident) and the recent death of her long time companion set her up to be the 'perfect victim'.  Her step mother, Ann Todd, and the family chauffeur Ronald Lewis are oh-so accommodating and thoughtful, explaining that her father is out of town.  But, Strasberg starts to see dead dad popping up all over, while Todd, Lewis, and family doctor Christopher Lee try to persuade her she's just stressed and overly-imaginative.  Is she crazy? Are they gas-lighting her?  Although the viewer will remain suspicious, we are wisely kept in the dark as to motives (of all the characters..) until the final twist.  The black and white photography is really well done..moody, shadowy..and is probably as important as the characters...not the usual Hammer screamer in intense shades of red.  I saw this film years ago, and even though I knew what was really going on, I enjoyed the viewing.  I watched on Classic Reel, but I think it's available on Amazon prime as well.  Great example of a stylish little suspense film.      Image result for scream of fear 1961

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fame Is the Name of the Game (1966)  -  6/10

hqdefault.jpg

TV-movie pilot that was later followed by a series. Tony Franciosa is a jet-setting magazine writer who stumbles upon a murder case linked to powerful men. Also featuring Jill St. John, Jack Klugman, George Macready, Jack Weston, Lee Bowman, Nanette Fabray, Nick Colasanto, and introducing Susan Saint James. I watched it for Robert Duvall, who has a brief role as a grieving husband. His short screen time manages to outshine most others in the film. Jay C. Flippin is also good as a broken-down retired baseball player.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, shutoo said:

Are they gas-lighting her?

What does that phrase mean? Never heard it before.

5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Nick Colasanto

I had to rack my brain to recall who that is.....it's COACH! In 1966? Did you recognize him?

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spurred by some of the reviews/recommendations, from a page or so ago, I checked out SEANCE ON A WET AFTERNOON (UK, 1964) last night (and this morning) on TCM ON HULU.

(side note: it was pouring rain when i watched the second part, which is a great way to see it)

LSyNZJk.jpg

Whether it was proper or not, I turned it off a little over an hour in and went to bed, then watched the rest very early this morning when I woke up- and, in retrospect, it was the right thing to do. I went to bed kindasorta not feeling it, but my enthusiasm grew exponentially as the third act unfurled, to anyone interested in it who has not seen it, I really would advise you to be patient with it, it's really worth sticking with to the third act, which is when the pistons really start to fire (it's one of those movies I ended up talking back the characters loudly, but in a good way.)

it's very unsettling but i really, really enjoyed the twist at the end.

YES, KIM STANLEY was marvelous, it's funny that she lost BEST ACTRESS to 🎶JUUUUULIE AAAAANDREEEEEEEEEEEWS 🎶** in MARY POPPINS, because THIS FILM IS LIKE A BLACK COMEDY PARODY OF MARY POPPINS in so many ways- they both involve stiff-upper (and heavily mustachioed) lip British father figures, looney mothers, and Nanny/Nurse figures "taking care" of precocious children using decidedly unconventional methods, only I found STANLEY and CO. a lot less creepy than their DISNEYFIED counterparts.

I couldn't help but wonder what Andrews herself could've done with the part, or DEBORAH KERR, who turned it down (according to wikipedia.)

As awesome as STANLEY was, I actually came away MOST IMPRESSED with the performance of RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH as the world's most patient husband. He really did some marvelous things with his eyes and his face and his body and expressions- and it was watching his character and his reactions to the ludicrous scenarios in which he is placed that kept me interested in the somewhat slow first half.

There are LOTS of views of 1963 London in this-a poster for BILLY LIAR can be seen in front of a cinema.

This was a CRITERION copy of the film they showed, and the print was BAD! All scratched up! There was one scene in darkness and it looked like a simulated rainstorm the scratches were so prevalent.

Seriously, CRITERION? That $29.99 is all for the cover art I guess? No chance you can set some portion aside to send the negative through a nitrate dip?

 

** (it's the magic word!)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

What does that phrase mean? Never heard it before.

 

I believe the term "gas light" means to emotionally abuse and manipulate someone by either questioning everything they say, turning an argument around on them to make them seem wrong, withholding and/or providing false information to confuse the victim and affect their credibility...

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I had to rack my brain to recall who that is.....it's COACH! In 1966? Did you recognize him?

Yes, although at first I thought it was Ed Asner. I had never seen "Coach" Colasanto in anything older than Raging Bull from 1980. In Fame Is the Name of the Game he played the stereotypical cynical, rumpled police detective. He had dark hair, but I could still recognize his voice. Looking at his IMDb page, he was in television going back to 1958. I also see that he was in Fat City in '72 and Family Plot in '76, both of which I've seen, but I don't recall him from either.

I found this picture of him that resembles his appearance from the movie I watched, although his hair is grayer in this pic.

3348.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Spurred by some of the reviews/recommendations, from a page or so ago, I checked out SEANCE ON A WET AFTERNOON (UK, 1964) last night (and this morning) on TCM ON HULU.

(side note: it was pouring rain when i watched the second part, which is a great way to see it)

LSyNZJk.jpg

Whether it was proper or not, I turned it off a little over an hour in and went to bed, then watched the rest very early this morning when I woke up- and, in retrospect, it was the right thing to do. I went to bed kindasorta not feeling it, but my enthusiasm grew exponentially as the third act unfurled, to anyone interested in it who has not seen it, I really would advise you to be patient with it, it's really worth sticking with to the third act, which is when the pistons really start to fire (it's one of those movies I ended up talking back the characters loudly, but in a good way.)

it's very unsettling but i really, really enjoyed the twist at the end.

YES, KIM STANLEY was marvelous, it's funny that she lost BEST ACTRESS to 🎶JUUUUULIE AAAAANDREEEEEEEEEEEWS 🎶** in MARY POPPINS, because THIS FILM IS LIKE A BLACK COMEDY PARODY OF MARY POPPINS in so many ways- they both involve stiff-upper (and heavily mustachioed) lip British father figures, looney mothers, and Nanny/Nurse figures "taking care" of precocious children using decidedly unconventional methods, only I found STANLEY and CO. a lot less creepy than their DISNEYFIED counterparts.

I couldn't help but wonder what Andrews herself could've done with the part, or DEBORAH KERR, who turned it down (according to wikipedia.)

As awesome as STANLEY was, I actually came away MOST IMPRESSED with the performance of RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH as the world's most patient husband. He really did some marvelous things with his eyes and his face and his body and expressions- and it was watching his character and his reactions to the ludicrous scenarios in which he is placed that kept me interested in the somewhat slow first half.

There are LOTS of views of 1963 London in this-a poster for BILLY LIAR can be seen in front of a cinema.

This was a CRITERION copy of the film they showed, and the print was BAD! All scratched up! There was one scene in darkness and it looked like a simulated rainstorm the scratches were so prevalent.

Seriously, CRITERION? That $29.99 is all for the cover art I guess? No chance you can set some portion aside to send the negative through a nitrate dip?

 

** (it's the magic word!)

Yes, it starts slowly, but it builds. Kim is so creepily off, though, it holds your attention (at least it does for me). Attenborough offers fine support in a less showy role. I first saw this when I was in HS on our local PBS station. Really creeped me out.

Julie got the sympathy vote. After you see this and Marriage, Italian Style, you have to wonder WHAT were they thinking???

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Dark Mirror (1946)  -  7/10

dark-mirror-half-sheet.png?w=625

 

Another psychological drama made during a glut after the war ended, this one also traffics in the "evil twin" trope, with Olivia de Havilland in the dual role, as Dr. Lew Ayres tries to figure out which is the bad one. I liked Thomas Mitchell as an investigating police detective, and Robert Siodmak's stylish direction. In the poster above, giant Olivia seems to have smelled something bad.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yes, it starts slowly, but it builds. Kim is so creepily off, though, it holds your attention (at least it does for me). Attenborough offers fine support in a less showy role. I first saw this when I was in HS on our local PBS station. Really creeped me out.

Julie got the sympathy vote. After you see this and Marriage, Italian Style, you have to wonder WHAT were they thinking???

I won’t say anything to spoil it, but it really puts you through a roller coaster of emotions and manipulates you shamelessly- And good on it I say. 

Stanleys British accent was very good, but I like how she seemed to intentionally imply it was put on, in her big breakdown scene it seemed to me as if she started speaking with a less pronounced Britishness. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Dark Mirror (1946)  -  7/10

dark-mirror-half-sheet.png?w=625

 

Another psychological drama made during a glut after the war ended, this one also traffics in the "evil twin" trope, with Olivia de Havilland in the dual role, as Dr. Lew Ayres tries to figure out which is the bad one. I liked Thomas Mitchell as an investigating police detective, and Robert Siodmak's stylish direction. In the poster above, giant Olivia seems to have smelled something bad.

I’ve been wanting to see this film. Where did you see it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I’ve been wanting to see this film. Where did you see it?

Online. There's a copy or two up on YouTube at the moment.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Devotion (1946)  -  6/10

devotion-movie-poster.jpg

Here's another movie that I've heard about for many years before actually getting around to watching it. It's often cited as a prime example of Hollywood fictionalization in historical and/or biographical films, as this look at the Bronte family is largely comprised of processed baloney. Emily (Ida Lupino) and Charlotte (Olivia de Havilland) are the main focus as they both vie for the affections of ambulatory-yet-inert-solid Paul Henreid. Arthur Kennedy is their drunken brother Branwell, and Sydney Greenstreet smirks his way through the film's later passages as Thackeray. Montagu Love, as the Bronte pater familias, died nearly three years before the movie was released, as it was shelved until after the war ended. The Bride Wore Boots, another 1946 film that I watched last night, featured both Robert Benchley and Mae Busch, both of whom died before that movie hit the screens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Devotion (1946)  -  6/10

devotion-movie-poster.jpg

 

By the time of this film's release three years after it had been made Olivia had sued Warners (and won). Thus she got third billing in Devotion. That may have been an obvious kick in the pants by Jack Warner but it hardly compares to the pain he felt following de Havilland's court approved boot to a far more sensitive area on him.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Goes My Love (1946)  -  6/10

31cfd35e08e48b55f7942cbaf5869e98.jpg

Good-natured fluff based on the life of inventor Hiram Stephen Maxim (Don Ameche). Instead of a traditional biopic, this is more of a cutesy domestic comedy about Maxim's marriage to Jane (Myrna Loy), and their raising of son Percy (Bobby Driscoll). It's nice enough if you like that sort of thing. I don't, really.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It's nice enough if you like that sort of thing. I don't, really. 

:lol:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I’ve been wanting to see this film. Where did you see it?

It's Universal why TCM has never shown it. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sight of dorky Dicky Attenborough putting around town and country in his

motorcycle/sidecar combo had me in stitches despite myself. His disguise only

made it even funnier. Otherwise a very well done movie. I was relieved to find out

that the upper class twitette was not dead but only sleeping. And if I was Dicky

I would have been boiling mad when big mouth medium let the whole cat out of the

bag. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/23/2019 at 11:13 AM, rayban said:

Unlike his later "The Hotel New Hampshire", this strange movie turned into a wholly exhilirating and consistently entertaining excursion into a true and genuine "film original". 

It's pretty off beat for sure and quite noirish in spots. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Well-Groomed Bride (1946)  -  5/10

220px-The_Well-Groomed_Bride_1946_Poster

Weak rom-com with Olivia de Havilland and Ray Milland fighting over the last bottle of champagne in San Francisco. He's a Navy officer who wants it to christen a ship with, while she wants to use it in a wedding. The two fall in love because of it, naturally. With Sonny Tufts, James Gleason, Percy Kilbride, and Minerva Urecal as "Woman".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I believe the term "gas light" means to emotionally abuse and manipulate someone by either questioning everything they say, turning an argument around on them to make them seem wrong, withholding and/or providing false information to confuse the victim and affect their credibility...

Not only that but the tern seems to originate from the film Gaslight itself. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/23/2019 at 11:19 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

TONY RICHARDSON did THE HOTEL NEW HAMPSHIRE?

Might check it out, while I don't really "get" THE LOVED ONE, I liked BLUE SKY and I really, really liked TOM JONES a lot (if it had never won the Oscar it would still be raved about as a great cult classic.)

I'm not fond of Tony Richardson (or Tom Jones, and certainly not Loved One), so maybe I'm biased in saying Hotel New Hampshire was a hot mess--

George Roy Hill and Robin Williams could make head or tail out of "The World According to Garp", and Michael Caine made "The Cider House Rules" watchable, but both wandered off of their John Irving books to create something relatively cinematic.  Richardson, OTOH, films Irving straight out of the text, and...yikes.  😵 Irving may simply be one of those unfilmable authors, just like nobody's ever yet done a watchable Kurt Vonnegut movie.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

The sight of dorky Dicky Attenborough putting around town and country in his

motorcycle/sidecar combo had me in stitches despite myself. His disguise only

made it even funnier. Otherwise a very well done movie. I was relieved to find out

that the upper class twitette was not dead but only sleeping. And if I was Dicky

I would have been boiling mad when big mouth medium let the whole cat out of the

bag. 

LOL. He did look ridiculous. I'm sure it was intended to show how pathetic this scheme was........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Well-Groomed Bride (1946)  -  5/10

220px-The_Well-Groomed_Bride_1946_Poster

Weak rom-com with Olivia de Havilland and Ray Milland fighting over the last bottle of champagne in San Francisco. He's a Navy officer who wants it to christen a ship with, while she wants to use it in a wedding. The two fall in love because of it, naturally. With Sonny Tufts, James Gleason, Percy Kilbride, and Minerva Urecal as "Woman".

Olivia left WB for THIS???

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us