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I Just Watched...

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

But it's precisely because it is done poorly that I love it.

As I recall, they also use a vocal track laid down by someone who in no way whatsoever is a reasonable facsimile of LIZABETH SCOTT. It's like having LOUIS ARMSTRONG dubbed by DORIS DAY- you almost wait for the curtain to slide back as the punchline to the whole scene.

i might be my favorite scene in the movie.

 

LMREO!!!

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I'll have to watch the film again, just for that number. (I remember it as being forgettable, but I'll play closer attention next time!)

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14 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Cant remember the last time [the 1952 CARRIE ] was shown on TCM. 2 DECADES? :(

No, I remember distinctly it has aired within the last 5-7 years (or so.) I remember Osborne introducing it and mentioned that it was no relation to the 1976 film of the same title (big duh, but it was funny.)

it was pretty good as I recall, although I'm surprised Jennifer Jones would want to do another period piece so (relatively) hot on the heels of GONE TO EARTH and MADAME BOVARY.

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According to MovieCollector's info, Carrie aired once in August of '09.

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

According to MovieCollector's info, Carrie aired once in August of '09.

Oh, ten years then. Well, I still have some recollection of it...

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Down Among the Sheltering Palms (1952)  -  5/10

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Musical military comedy about American G.I.'s being stationed on a remote Pacific island inhabited by dozens of single, beautiful women. The men are ordered not to fraternize, which becomes difficult when island princess Mytzi Gaynor sets her sights on C.O. William Lundigan, while Lieutenant David Wayne has to deal with beautiful secretary Jane Greer. Also featuring Gloria DeHaven, Gene Lockhart, Billy Gilbert, Jack Paar, Henry Kulky, Claud Allster, George Nader, Barney Phillips, Joe Turkel, Lyle Talbot, and Lee Marvin. Technicolor fluff that has a "wink-wink" sexuality of the type that would become over-saturated on screen in the late 50's through the mid 60's.

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39 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

No, I remember distinctly it has aired within the last 5-7 years (or so.) I remember Osborne introducing it and mentioned that it was no relation to the 1976 film of the same title (big duh, but it was funny.)

it was pretty good as I recall, although I'm surprised Jennifer Jones would want to do another period piece so (relatively) hot on the heels of GONE TO EARTH and MADAME BOVARY.

I must've missed it then. Figures. The last time I remember seeing it was a LONG time ago. (over a decade at least!) I know they didnt run it when Jones was SOTM.....

 

The studio dropped the Sister from the title as they were afraid the audience would think it was about nuns. LOL!

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6 hours ago, Swithin said:

 

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"Mr. Northam, the yearbook photographer is here."

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I was channel flipping and noticed that MOVIES-TV is showing the 1940 Davis film The Letter, and then,  the Crawford film,  Mildred Pierce.  

TCM spotlighted these two actress and these films just the other day as part of Oscar month.   

Strange that MOVIES-TV appears to be doing the same.

PS:  They are currently showing a short about the movie career of Joan Crawford.  They often do this during the 'dead-time' between films so that films start on the hour \ half-hour.   These shorts are really great, since they cover in detail an actor's film legacy.

 

 

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Down Among the Z Men (1952)  -  4/10

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Another terrible comedy featuring the Goon Show cast. Harry Seacombe stars as a dim-witted shop clerk who gets suckered into looking for a scientist (Michael Bentine) with a secret formula. This also interests the military in the form of officer Peter Sellers and numbskull enlisted man Spike Milligan. Unfunny to a painful degree.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

According to MovieCollector's info, Carrie aired once in August of '09.

Well, that's awhile. It seemed longer than that, but maybe not. I wonder how some Paramount films get shown and others rarely if at all. Can the rental cost be THAT BAD????

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The Duel at Silver Creek (1952)  -  7/10

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Technicolor western from director Don Siegel. Audie Murphy stars as the Silver Kid, a man looking for revenge after his father is killed by a gang of murderous claim-jumpers. Murphy teams up with Marshall Lightning Tyrone (Stephen McNally), but little do they know that the gang leaders are respected townsfolk Gerald Mohr and Faith Domergue. Also featuring Susan Cabot as the tomboy love interest "Dusty Fargo", James Anderson as "Rat Face", Eugene Iglesias as "Johnny Sombrero", and Lee Marvin as "Tinhorn". Quick-paced, though routine, action film with memorable characters.

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Has Anybody Seen My Gal? (1952)  -  7/10

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Nostalgic Technicolor comedy from director Douglas Sirk. Charles Coburn is the world's wealthiest man circa 1928. As his life is drawing to an end, he decides that he wants to leave his fortune to the family of the woman, now deceased, who he was once in love with. He goes to their town incognito, pretending to be a boarder and staying at their home, in order to learn whether they are worthy of his money. Featuring Piper Laurie as the eldest daughter who is being romanced by poor soda-jerk Rock Hudson and rich drunk Skip Homeier. Also with Lynn Bari, Larry Gates, William Reynolds, Gigi Perreau, Gloria Holden, and James Dean. I thought this was cute, innocuous fun, with lively performances and an affection for the period. Dean appears briefly ordering a malt. This was the first teaming of director Sirk and star Hudson.

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33 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Has Anybody Seen My Gal? (1952)  -  7/10

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 James Dean appears briefly ordering a malt.

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"The cold from this malt is TERRIBLY ME APART!"

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Seven Men From Now (1955)

Produced by Batjac Productions and released through Warner Brothers, Seven Men From Now was the first of the seven western "B" collaborations between director Budd Boetticher and star Randolph Scott. Virtually ignored by critics at the time and rediscovered to great acclaim in the years since, these films are noteworthy for their lean but effective presentations and the ambiguity of the characterizations of Scott's hero and the various lead villains in the series. Often the performances of the actors playing the villains in these films make those characterizations more interesting than that of Scott.

Scott plays a former sheriff out to avenge the death of his wife in a holdup as he hunts down the seven men responsible. Gail Russell and Walter Reed play an eastern greenhorn couple in a covered wagon Scott encounters and accompanies during his search, while Lee Marvin, in a star making role, delivers a charismatic and flamboyant performance as a gunman who also seeks to accompany Scott in that search in the hopes of getting the money stolen by the robbers Scott pursues. If he has to achieve that by going over Scott's body in the process, so be it.

Boetticher's film gets off to an impressive start when Scott tracks down two of the men he seeks holding up in a cave during a rainstorm. There is a terse exchange of dialogue as the two men, one frightened, the other suspicious, ask questions of the stranger emerging from the rain. Scott lets them know the town he's from, to which the men make reference to the killing there. When the suspicious one asks Scott if any of the seven men involved in the killing have been found, Scott gives him an ominous stare as he replies, "Two of them."

As the man goes for his gun Boetticher immediately cuts away from the scene to the reaction of horses outside to the sounds of gunfire coming from the cave. A stylish and effective beginning, achieved through limited dialogue, a building tension and virtually no visible action, merely sound effects.

One of the best scenes in the film, and a wonderful showcase for Marvin, is when he, Scott and Russell and husband Reed are all taking cover together from the rain inside a covered wagon. Through a fanciful tale about "another" man Marvin makes it apparent that he is strongly attracted to Russell without quite saying so, an emasculating moment for the husband whom Marvin clearly regards as a weakling.

Scott gives Marvin glares and terse warnings to end the conversation. Instead Marvin goes further, brazenly speaking the truth, as he implies that Scott himself is also attracted to Russell, who, understandably, grows increasingly uncomfortable throughout this conversation, every bit as much as her husband.

Seven Men From Now makes expressive use of the countryside, with streams and bushes and, in particular, rocky mountainous ranges all playing an eye filling role. And, as with the opening scene in the cave, the final confrontation is highly effective, achieved through a dialogue exchange, judicious editing and sound effects.

A solid if, in the final analysis, unexceptional, western, Seven Men From Now was the favourite of the seven film series by director Boetticher. By the way, after the film has ended, you realize that Scott didn't get all of the seven men involved, after all. But who's counting?

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3 out of 4

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13 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Speedy, Dead Reckoning- Bogart and Lizabeth Scott is a good one,  TCM has shown this one. The film with Lizabeth Scott I don't remember ever seeing and want to is Paid in Full. This one's a little different, there's a role reversal, Lizabeth plays the good sister and Diana Lynn plays the bad one

Paid in Full is what used to be called a "woman's picture" and is now called a "domestic melodrama." Lizabeth Scott is in love with her sister's husband. The sister (Diana Lynn) has mental problems, and the husband begins to think he married the wrong sister. However, the married couple has a child. Get ready for a big soapy twist! All is set soapily right in the end, at least in women's picture terms. I must have seen this on AMC many a year ago.

Tom, I am also a fan of Seven Men from Now and most of the other Boetticher/Scott westerns. You've described the opening of the film so well.

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4 minutes ago, kingrat said:

 

Tom, I am also a fan of Seven Men from Now and most of the other Boetticher/Scott westerns. You've described the opening of the film so well.

Thanks, kingrat. Aside from Seven Men From Now I think that The Tall T, Ride Lonesome and Comanche Station are all very worthwhile viewing, as well. It's been a while since I saw Buchanan Rides Alone but, if I recall correctly, I liked that one, too.

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Ritual of Evil (1970)  -  6/10

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Made-for-TV supernatural drama with Louis Jourdan as a psychiatrist who investigates the circumstances of the death of one of his patients. It seems she may have been mixed up with with satanic cultists, which everyone in California seemed to be during the 1970's. Also featuring Anne Baxter, Belinda Montgomery, Diana Hyland, John McMartin, Georg Sanford Brown, and Wilfrid Hyde-White. This was a follow-up to the previous year's Fear No Evil, and both films were shot as pilots for a series that would have been titled Bedeviled, with Jourdan and his mentor Hyde-White investigating supernatural mysteries. This movie would have been better about 20 minutes shorter, but Jourdan is pretty good in it.

 

Sole Survivor (1970)  -  7/10

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Made-for-TV supernatural drama about the crew of a WWII bomber who have been trapped as ghosts near the wreckage of their plane in North Africa for 17 years. It seems they can't move on as long as their bodies remain, but their purgatory may be over as Air Force personnel arrive to investigate once the plane is finally spotted. Richard Basehart is the one crew member who lived. Now a general, he has accompanied the investigators (Vince Edwards and William Shatner) to the wreckage site to finally confront his own personal demons. Also featuring Patrick Wayne, Lou Antonio, Lawrence Casey, Dennis Cooney, Brad David, Alan Calliou, and Ian Abercrombie. I was expecting this to be a mystery as to whether the crewmen were ghosts or not, but it's quickly established that they are, and the film becomes more of existential look at guilt and repentance. Shatner overdoes as usual at this point in his career, but Edwards and Basehart are pretty good. 

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Sole Survivor (1970)  -  7/10

Sounds like they extended The Twilight Zone's S2, Ep1 King Nine Will Not Return

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

Diplomatic Courier (1952)  -  7/10

Featuring  Michael Ansara

Heh I'm reading Barbara Eden's autobiography and he was her first husband. I'm completely unfamiliar with him.

Someone at the library needs to understand basic data entry: 

I cannot find CRISS CROSS no matter how I search it. I know I've spotted before most likely searching "Burt Lancaster" or "Yvonne DeCarlo". Not this time.

And in my "results" vainly searching for it using keywords "crime noir"... THE DARK CORNER shows up! I tried last week searching: "Lucille Ball", "The Dark Corner", "Clifton Webb"....no results! 👎🏾

Thanks to all for contributing to this thread. (also glad I'm not the only one who mixes up their "noirs")

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Hong Kong (1952)  -  5/10

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Corny Technicolor adventure with Ronald Reagan as a man of action who gets hired to steal a valuable statue. he ends up trying to protect a 4-year-old orphan boy with the help of missionary's daughter Rhonda Fleming. With Nigel Bruce, Marvin Miller, Claud Allister, Victor Sen Yung, and Keye Luke. There's lots of talk about "Chinese commies".

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I am watching TOM JONES (1963) right now. File this one with HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY and OLIVER! under “Genuinely good and entertaining BEST PICTURE winners that, had they not won,would likely be far better regarded today.”

(it really is a unique, charming movie.)

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I find Oliver! to be horrid. One of the absolute worst Best Picture winners. I like the other two you mention, though.

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Horizons West (1952)  -  6/10

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Mediocre Technicolor western with Robert Ryan and Rock Hudson as brothers (their parents are John McIntire and Frances Bavier!) returning to their Texas family ranch after fighting for the Confederacy during the Civil War. Hudson is content to work with their father for modest success, but Ryan is ambitious to the point of mania and takes on the world in order to become the biggest man in the region. Also featuring Julie Adams, Raymond Burr, James Arness, Dennis Weaver, Judith Braun, Tom Powers, Rodolfo Acosta, and Mae Clarke. The large cast of future TV stars is interesting, and I enjoyed seeing Julie Adams again (RIP), but the plot is a bit tired, and Ryan overdoes it.

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52 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I find Oliver! to be horrid. One of the absolute worst Best Picture winners. I like the other two you mention, though.

I understand.

i admit the kid playing Oliver suuuuuuuuuuuuuuucks, but it’s a sentimental favorite from childhood (and I love the songs esp ID DO ANYTHING FOR YOU)

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