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I Just Watched...

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

From the top:

Voodoo Woman (featuring one of the great evil female characters, a really nasty piece of work from Pittsburgh); The Undead (one of my favorite Roger Corman films. The woman depicted is actually a good witch.); She Devil (about a brunette so evil she can just wish herself into a blonde, but at least her tuberculosis was cured); The Astounding She Monster (some question as to whether this is a '57 or '58 film); and El Vampiro (Carmen Montejo is no Auntie Mame!)

You've probably seen at least a couple of those. 1957 is one of the best years for horror, for the boys as well (think Tabanga).

I've seen The UndeadShe DevilEl Vampiro and The Astounding She Monster. I can't find a copy of Voodoo Woman, though. :( 

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8 hours ago, TomJH said:

Screaming Mimi (1957), starring Anita Ekberg as an exotic dancer.

Anita+Ekberg+Screaming+Mimi.gif

Words aren't necessary. After that image you've already made up your mind whether you want to see the film.

4 out of 4 (just for the visuals)

The book it's based on is way better than the film, and the strip show music was kind head scratching and of off the wall, I believe that it was Gypsy Rose Lee as the strip club owner.

P.S. In the book her striptease act was accompanied by her dog who removed the various articles of her clothing.

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57 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The book it's based on is way better than the film, and the strip show music was kind head scratching and of off the wall, I believe that it was Gypsy Rose Lee as the strip club owner.

P.S. In the book her striptease act was accompanied by her dog who removed the various articles of her clothing.

Written by  Charles Willeford? 

(One part too lazy to Google, one part curious if I’m right)

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen The UndeadShe DevilEl Vampiro and The Astounding She Monster. I can't find a copy of Voodoo Woman, though. :( 

While there's a Spanish language version of Voodoo Woman on You Tube now, there has been an English language version there in the past. You might keep your eyes on that website in case it returns.

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Hell on Frisco Bay (1955)  -  7/10

Hell+on+Frisco+Bay+1955+25+Alan+Ladd%252

CinemaScope crime drama with Alan Ladd as a former cop who's just been released from prison after being framed for manslaughter. He's determined to get revenge, so he pushes away his singer girlfriend Joanne Dru. The man behind the frame-up is gangster Edward G. Robinson who will go to great lengths to stay out of prison. Also featuring William Demarest, Paul Stewart, Fay Wray, Perry Lopez, Stanley Adams, Peter Hansen, Nestor Paiva, Anthony Caruso, Rod Taylor, and Jayne Mansfield. I liked this early widescreen effort, which uses the format to maximum effect with excellent shot composition. Stewart has one of his better roles as a scar-faced minion of Robinson's. I also liked the small role of Fay Wray as a former film star now dating Stewart's character. One of the film's best scenes is between Wray and Robinson. Speaking of Edward, he plays a complete louse in this one, a truly reprehensible slimeball who never passes up a chance to insult, demean and bully those around him. I thought it was one of his best roles of the 1950's.

It's really good to see Eddie G. with a good, vicious role once again. What a slimeball! This was a fun throwback to old fashioned gangster films and I agree that Paul Stewart gives an excellent account of himself in a largely sympathetic part even if he is a hood. The Warners Archive widescreen release of this film is beautiful.

(If only the film could have had Anita Ekberg doing a striptease, though).

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The book it's based on is way better than the film, and the strip show music was kind head scratching and of off the wall, I believe that it was Gypsy Rose Lee as the strip club owner.

 

At one point in Screaming Mimi Gypsy Rose Lee sings "Put The Blame On Mame, Boys." Psssh, she'll never replace the image of Rita Hayworth doing the same number. Then, again, who could?

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen The UndeadShe DevilEl Vampiro and The Astounding She Monster. I can't find a copy of Voodoo Woman, though. :( 

Until recently, there were copies on YouTube, but now there seem to be only ones dubbed in Spanish.

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A Kid for Two Farthings (1955)  -  7/10

kid_for_two_farthings_UKquad.jpg

Amusing multi-character comedy-drama from director Carol Reed. In London's East End, various characters try to make their hopes and dreams come true, including a bodybuilder (Joe Robinson) who enters the wrestling world, a bleach-blonde seamstress (Diana Dors) who wants to marry him, a lonely shopgirl (Celia Johnson), and her young son (Jonathan Ashmore) who tries to find a unicorn in order to make everyone's wishes come true. Also featuring David Kossoff, Brenda de Banzie, Lou Jacobi, Sidney James, Irene Handl, Vera Day, Alfie Bass, Spike Milligan, and Primo Carnera. Good color cinematography highlights this sentimental yet effective glimpse at a specific place and time. 

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King's Rhapsody (1955)  -  5/10

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Romantic musical with Errol Flynn as the prince of a small European principality who is told by his mother (Martita Hunt) to marry a princess (Patrice Wymore), even though the prince loves his girlfriend (Anna Neagle) in nearby Monte Carlo. Also featuring Finlay Currie, Francis De Wolff, Joan Benham, Reginald Tate, and Miles Malleson. I would have to rank this as my least favorite Errol Flynn film, despite the good production values, including elaborate costumes, widescreen color cinematography, and lavish settings. Yes, Cuban Rebel Girls is intrinsically worse, but it's at least entertaining in a car crash kind of way. This is just dull and listless, uninspired and perfunctory. Flynn is seriously bloated, and there is more than one scene where he appears (and sounds) drunk. I have to mark this as a misfire, to my tastes, anyway.

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Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955)  -  5/10

MV5BZjZiZDg4OTktOTFlYi00Zjc2LWE5MjItMDY2

Technicolor costume drama with George Nader as English Lord Leofric, a nobleman who has been ordered by the king Edward the Confessor (Eduard Franz) to marry a Norman princess. Instead, Leofric marries local gal Lady Godiva (Maureen O'Hara). Their subsequent tempestuous relationship mirrors the growing conflict between the Normans and the Saxons, eventually leading Godiva to make her famous ride. Also featuring Victor McLaglen, Leslie Bradley, Henry Brandon, Torin Thatcher, Rex Reason, Arthur Shields, Robert Warwick, Grant Withers, Gene Roth, Rhodes Reason, and Clint Eastwood. Another colorful production undone by a bad script and lackluster direction. Much of this feels targeted toward children, but then things get pretty violent, and there's the big "nude" riding scene, of course. 

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MARY POPPINS RETURNS (2018) *Score: 7/10*

It's taken me a while to actually take the time to write up my review, but I felt compelled to, as I may be the resident Disney fanatic around these parts. I have a lot of things to say about this one, so... Take it away, Bette.  

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STARRING: Emily Blunt, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Ben Whishaw, Emily Mortimer, Julie Walters, Meryl Streep, Colin Firth, Angela Lansbury, Dick Van Dyke, and children Pixie Davies, Joel Dawson, & Nathanael Saleh. Needless to say, I was very excited about this cast, and they really didn't disappoint for the most part. 

For starters, I'd like to say that the original 1964 movie and this 2018 sequel (not a remake, as it surrounds Jane and Michael all grown up and the former's progeny) have a lot of similarities. I will talk about these in a minute, but first, I'd like to acknowledge the fact that frequent Stephen Sondheim conductor/arranger, Paul Gemignani, did the orchestrations for this movie. I don't know, I just really like him. 

The film starts out with Jack (Miranda) singing "Underneath the Lovely London Sky," a lovely little ditty about the early morning in London, and following your dreams? That's at least what I got from this song. The plot of the film is very much the same as the original, in the sense that Mary Poppins-ex Machina has to come take care of an entire family (not just the children, but the parents as well), while simultaneously re-introducing the idea that imagination is powerful and important to all involved. 

It turns out that Michael's wife has recently died, and the Fidelity Fiduciary Bank is about to evict him and his children, as he is not making enough money at his teller job. Michael and his sister Jane are very stressed out over the very high probability that they will be homeless in about a week, and have to try to search their entire house for the documents proving their father left them shares in the bank. 

Mary Poppins flies into town on a very windy day, and follows the children back to their house and assumes her old position at the Banks house. She commences taking the children on fantastic and other-wordly adventures. 

Now, for a breakdown on the similarities between the songs: 

1. Can You Imagine That?- essentially the "Spoonful of Sugar" of this film. 

Image result for can you imagine that mary poppins

"Can You Imagine That" is all about getting the kids to take a bath (something they don't want to do). Mary makes it seem a lot more fun than it really is. I got flashbacks to "Spoonful of Sugar" almost throughout the entirety of this number. 

2. The Royal Doulton Music Hall: (Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious)

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This one is a bit of a stretch, but it takes place in an "imaginary" world and the lyrics are partially comprised of some made-up words. 

3. Turning Turtle (I Love to Laugh): 

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This whole scene deals with one of Mary Poppins' relatives, only instead of Uncle Albert, it's her cousin. The number is about how Mary's cousin's world gets turned upside down every second Wednesday. So, I guess Mary's relatives really have things for the ceiling. 

4. Trip a Little Light Fantastic (Step in Time): 

Image result for trip a little light fantastic

As if it wasn't enough having Jack be a knock-off Bert the Chimney Sweep, he and his lamp-lighter friends get a whole song/dance number that is essentially the same thing as "Step in Time." 

5. Nowhere to Go but Up (Let's Go Fly a Kite): 

Image result for nowhere to go but up mary poppins

Angela Lansbury replaces the Bird Lady in the original film; this time as a nameless Balloon Lady. This song is a rousing chorus of regained juvenility (as is its predecessor), and it takes place in the sky, with balloons in place of kites. 

Contrary to the borderline negative things I've said so far, I actually enjoyed it. I think since I went in knowing it was supposed to be a sequel, but coming to the conclusion that it would most likely be more of a retelling of the same story, I was okay. The special effects and colors and music were all great. I would recommend going to see this if only for Emily Blunt's portrayal of the titular character. She did Julie Andrews proud, in my opinion. 

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Written by  Charles Willeford? 

(One part too lazy to Google, one part curious if I’m right)

Fredric Brown novel of the same name.

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Lucy Gallant (1955)  -  6/10

220px-Lucy_Gallant_poster.jpg

Soapy melodrama with Jane Wyman as a woman on a train who decides to stop off in an oil boom town. She opens up a women's fashions store and becomes a huge success, but her romance with local rancher Charlton Heston keeps getting interrupted and derailed. Also featuring Thelma Ritter, Clair Trevor, Wallace Ford, William Demarest, Gloria Talbott, James Westerfield, Tom Helmore, Roscoe Ates, Jay Adler, Gene Roth, Jody McCrea, Bing Russell, Joe Turkel, John Mitchum, and cameos from Edith Head and Texas governor Allan Shivers as themselves. Wyman seemed to specialize in this sort of soap opera material in the 1950's, and this is a passable example. 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955)  -  5/10

MV5BZjZiZDg4OTktOTFlYi00Zjc2LWE5MjItMDY2

Technicolor costume drama with George Nader as English Lord Leofric, a nobleman who has been ordered by the king Edward the Confessor (Eduard Franz) to marry a Norman princess. Instead, Leofric marries local gal Lady Godiva (Maureen O'Hara). Their subsequent tempestuous relationship mirrors the growing conflict between the Normans and the Saxons, eventually leading Godiva to make her famous ride. Also featuring Victor McLaglen, Leslie Bradley, Henry Brandon, Torin Thatcher, Rex Reason, Arthur Shields, Robert Warwick, Grant Withers, Gene Roth, Rhodes Reason, and Clint Eastwood. Another colorful production undone by a bad script and lackluster direction. Much of this feels targeted toward children, but then things get pretty violent, and there's the big "nude" riding scene, of course. 

Well, the poster is nice.

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17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Lucy Gallant (1955)  -  6/10

220px-Lucy_Gallant_poster.jpg

Soapy melodrama with Jane Wyman as a woman on a train who decides to stop off in an oil boom town. She opens up a women's fashions store and becomes a huge success, but her romance with local rancher Charlton Heston keeps getting interrupted and derailed. Also featuring Thelma Ritter, Clair Trevor, Wallace Ford, William Demarest, Gloria Talbott, James Westerfield, Tom Helmore, Roscoe Ates, Jay Adler, Gene Roth, Jody McCrea, Bing Russell, Joe Turkel, John Mitchum, and cameos from Edith Head and Texas governor Allan Shivers as themselves. Wyman seemed to specialize in this sort of soap opera material in the 1950's, and this is a passable example. 

She did, "Magnificent Obsession" and "All That Heaven Allows" are two splendid examples. 

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955)  -  5/10

Technicolor costume drama with George Nader as English Lord Leofric, a nobleman who has been ordered by the king Edward the Confessor (Eduard Franz) to marry a Norman princess. Instead, Leofric marries local gal Lady Godiva (Maureen O'Hara). Their subsequent tempestuous relationship mirrors the growing conflict between the Normans and the Saxons, eventually leading Godiva to make her famous ride. Also featuring Victor McLaglen, Leslie Bradley, Henry Brandon, Torin Thatcher, Rex Reason, Arthur Shields, Robert Warwick, Grant Withers, Gene Roth, Rhodes Reason, and Clint Eastwood. 

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Mad at the World (1955)  -  6/10

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Low-budget crime drama that's worth a look for fans of the genre. A "teenage wolfpack" throws a bottle out of their car window, hitting a baby and cracking his skull. The infant's despondent father (Keefe Brasselle) hopes the police will quickly catch the fiendish hellraisers, but lead detective Frank Lovejoy hits a dead-end, so Keefe goes vigilante, infiltrating the seamy underworld of teenage jazz clubs, ratty flophouses, cheap booze, and even cheaper women. Also featuring Cathy O'Donnell as Keefe's wife, Karen Sharpe, Stanley Clements, Paul Bryar, Joe Turkel, Joe Besser, and Aaron Spelling as "Willie". Estes Kefauver opens the film with a speech about the rising tide of juvenile delinquency. These JD's look to be in their late 20's or early 30's. This is really violent for the time. I enjoyed the scenes in the jazz club hangout favored by the "bad crowd". 

 

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The Magnificent Matador (1955)  -  5/10

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Eastmancolor and CinemaScope drama with Anthony Quinn as an aging toreador facing paralyzing fear and self-doubt. He finds comfort in the arms of rich gal Maureen O'Hara. Can the bullfight hero to millions find his self-confidence and return to the ring? Also featuring Thomas Gomez, Lola Albright, Richard Denning, William Ching, Eduardo Noriega, Manuel Rojas, Anthony Caruso, and a half dozen real-world bullfighting celebrities in cameos. I've previously voiced my distaste for bullfighting and films that portray it, and this one was no exception. I kept hoping the bull would gore them all, then jump into the stands and do as much damage as possible. Unfortunately, that never happened. The lead performances were good, though.

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New York Confidential (1955)  -  7/10

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Entertaining gangster flick starring Richard Conte as a low-level hitman from Chicago who gets brought into the New York City rackets run by big boss Broderick Crawford. As Conte's status improves, Crawford gets involved in bigger deals that will either make them all a fortune or bring them ruination. Meanwhile, Conte makes time with Crawford's daughter Anne Bancroft, while Crawford's moll Marilyn Maxwell has her eyes on Conte. Also featuring J. Carrol Naish, Celia Lovsky, Onslow Stevens, Barry Kelley, Steven Geray, Herbert Heyes, Nestor Paiva, John Doucette, Fortunio Bonanova, George E. Stone, Henry Kulky, and Mike Mazurki. A tough film, with Conte's ruthless killer an unlikely protagonist. There's really nothing here that I hadn't seen in other gangland pics, but it's done well, with a solid cast.

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10 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

MARY POPPINS RETURNS (2018) *Score: 7/10*

2. The Royal Doulton Music Hall: (Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious)

This one is a bit of a stretch, but it takes place in an "imaginary" world and the lyrics are partially comprised of some made-up words. 

And, that Lin breaks into the exact same motormouth-patter that Dick Van Dyke broke into, at the exact same point in the middle of the equivalent "Jolly Holiday".

(It's true that Mavis and Sybil have ways that are winning, and Prudence and Gwendolyn set your hearts spinning...)

Although, what's the lesson the kids learn from their excursion?  Not "Dads are people too", or "A spoonful of sugar", but "Don't trust the evil bad guy!"

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I just watched the 1932 pre-code 13 WOMEN starring Myrna Loy and Irene Dunne. This is a story entirely based on revenge at it's most preposterous but intriguing since it involves women. 🐱 me-ow That's all I have to say about the plot, which is predictable.

What makes this movie eye candy is Myrna Loy who captures you in every scene she's in. While I've always seen Loy as attractive enough and a likable actress, I was never gaga over her like so many are. Well, I finally saw "it" in this movie, that "it" surely helped pave the way for her becoming a star. Although her kooky "Asian" make up was a turn off, Myrna used her face and body precisely to convey her charactor, and never looked so menacingly stunning:

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The Asian/Siamese costumes were GREAT an outlandish example as seen in ^^^ that lobby card. I watch a lot of Bollywood and couldn't help being reminded of Ashwira Rai.

Aishwarya_Rai_2_2.jpg

Irene Dunne too, looked prettier than usual. She had a clean flapper look to her make up and benefits from a softer hairstyle. This movie contains the only screen performance of Peg Entwistle, the gal who tragically jumped off the Hollywood sign to her death.

Loved the hokey swami Yoga-dachi (!) played by C. Henry Gordon a performance right out of a Roger Corman film. This was an enjoyable pre-code with bonus lesbian references, good setting & photography with often atmospheric lighting and drama queen performances by all.

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I get the feeling that maybe THIRTEEN WOMEN was a really interesting film that got (for some reason) the Hell edited out of it (I want to say it's just barely an hour?)

or maybe what they cut out was just as boring as what they left in.

either way, it's fun to see IRENE DUNNE in something so tacky. I cannot think off hand of any other thrillers she did.

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On 2/18/2019 at 6:03 AM, cigarjoe said:

The book it's based on is way better than the film, and the strip show music was kind head scratching and of off the wall, I believe that it was Gypsy Rose Lee as the strip club owner.

P.S. In the book her striptease act was accompanied by her dog who removed the various articles of her clothing.

I wonder if the dog was a dobermanpinchher.

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just watched the 1932 pre-code 13 WOMEN starring Myrna Loy and Irene Dunne. This is a story entirely based on revenge at it's most preposterous but intriguing since it involves women. 🐱 me-ow That's all I have to say about the plot, which is predictable.

What makes this movie eye candy is Myrna Loy who captures you in every scene she's in. While I've always seen Loy as attractive enough and a likable actress, I was never gaga over her like so many are. Well, I finally saw "it" in this movie, that "it" surely helped pave the way for her becoming a star. Although her kooky "Asian" make up was a turn off, Myrna used her face and body precisely to convey her charactor, and never looked so menacingly stunning:

1d198c106b0bc25724c3298841761fa7.jpg

 

I love this movie very much!

I believe that Myrna Loy played a menacing oriental after this only in: The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932). She was perfect in both. I am glad that she stopped playing such roles before she began to parody herself.

Ricardo Cortez and C. Henry Gordon are a joy to watch.

It did sadden me that the scenes of Betty Furness as one of the women were cut. I had watched her on: I've Got a Secret and What's My Line? and had hoped to see what acting credentials led her to be a regular on such panel shows. It was only after missing her in this movie that I learned that her role and another role were cut. I do not know if those scenes were removed prior to the movie's release or were a part of its later reduction.

 

 

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