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I Just Watched...

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I saw this for the first time yesterday (TCM on HULU) and I liked it, but the hyper-critic in me had one big issue with it, which was that it lacked a central character.

I think it would have been a stronger movie had it settled on making MARCH, BLYTH or O'BRIEN the main character instead of it's being a genuine ensemble film where it seemed as if everyone got 1/3 screen time, almost a pre-Altman-style movie; I guess they felt odd about making a villain the main character, but the mid-to-late-40's were by this time rife with successful films where a villain was the lead, so  i think they should've embraced it.

FREDRIC MARCH was really impressive (as a real silver-plated SOB), reminded me a bit of his later work in INHERIT THE WIND where he just lets all the vanity go...speaking of, I get the feeling he did this movie for the chance to make his wife center stage at the end, her triumphant walk up the steps at the finale of the movie was a DeHavilland in THE HEIRESS-type moment, but again, nice as it was, it just highlighted for me how the film seemed to suffer from a lack of a protagonist (an occasional character gets THE last scene?)

thank you for pointing that out about DALL's character!!! I did not realize he was specifically going to fight FOR the cause of slavery in BRAZIL, that (in and of itself) could be a pretty funny concept for a movie: some sort of halfassed DON QUIXOTE warrior-for-hire for the cause of the rights of people to oppress others. what a Prince.

again, the film could've spent more time on the genteel, decaying cotton plantation family....i get the feeling they made the HUBBARDS seem downright functional by comparison.

There was also an interesting subplot about a lynching that i felt didn't get fully explored...a

as hypercritical as i can be, i can also be a little obtuse: why was this movie called ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST? did they explain it (as they do in THE LITTLE FOXES) and I missed it?

"Another part of the forest" is a stage direction from a Shakespeare play, possibly As You Like It, and Lillian Hellman thought of it as a title for her prequel. Just another part of the lying, selfishness, and assorted nastiness that is daily life in the Hubbard family. I'm glad you mentioned Florence Eldridge's big scene at the end.

It's historically accurate that some Confederates went to Brazil after the Civil War to continue living in a slave-owning society, and this seems like a great subject for fiction and movies.

More on Stanley Donen's interview: he did mention that Movie Movie was one of his favorites among his films. I've never seen it.

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I saw it, It was a cute film. But audiences at the time weren't interested.

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4 hours ago, Hibi said:

I saw it, It was a cute film. But audiences at the time weren't interested.

Assuming you're talking about "Movie Movie" (1978), it was a product of what I refer to as "the Carol Burnett Show 70's", when audiences liked to trivialize "Old late-night movies" for their naive cuteness, but hadn't actually seen enough of them to make specific jokes about them.  Which, of course, all changed in our culture once the VCR arrived, followed by cable.  (For ex., the WWI-trailer parody:  I don't think I've ever actually SEEN another WWI-flyboy movie besides the obvious Errol Flynn and "Dawn Patrol", and yet 70's jokes were convinced "old 30's movies" were flooded to the gills with them.)

It's pretty obvious in the choices of old-movie targets (they had Technicolor musicals in 1933??), but all audiences had to laugh at at the time was the mangled-metaphor script, which was cute, but didn't compete with the Mel Brooks parodies that were still fresh in our mind at the time.

I've never seen it.

Oh, well, here ya go--And it's on "free" Prime, too:  https://www.amazon.com/Movie-George-C-Scott/dp/B07FK5DL1F/

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Oh What a Lovely War (1969) - 👍👎 (mixed)

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Now that the weather's turning warmer, I can start going next door to our local library--whose DVD section inherited an entire 30-year downtown-storefront rental shop B) --and start browsing old movies there again.  Managed to find this one, from the '69-'75 days when movies weren't allowed to make bitter satirical antiwar statements against Vietnam, and had to metaphorically pick on all the other bungled wars of the past instead, with WWI being a very, very, VERY frequent target.  (Unless you happened to pick on Korea or WWII, but those were different movies.)

The concept here, taken from a London stage musical at the time, was to musically satirize England's role in WWI through real vintage music-hall and soldier songs, with the abstract framing device of cutting between real battle scenes, and the stage's concept of depicting WWI as a flag-waving Brighton beach-pier Sunday outing for the middle and upper-class folk:

Normally, "Absurdist/symbolist musical satire" would be the kind of thing you would sensibly(?) give to Ken Russell--But, since nobody mentions sex or religion, and spends their time in uniforms talking about king-and-country, they had to give it to Lord Richard Attenborough instead...Who, when he's not directing bitter satires of king-and-country, is one of the most frustratingly pedestrian directors in the business, who directs like he's flipping pages through the script, without any sense that there's some ultimate goal to the story:  I was one of the few people in '82 who thought "Gandhi" was ridiculously heavy-handed, Robert Downey Jr. still thinks it was his own fault the frustratingly pointless "Chaplin" didn't get an Oscar, and I have less idea why Attenborough was picked for "A Chorus Line: the Movie" than for why it was made.

When the movie works, it's a good historical Cliff-Notes for the events of WWI (we never got to study it in college as much, so I had no idea of the battles going in, or what happened after Archduke Ferdinand), but it's a long 2-1/2 hours, and both Attenborough and the play have enough time to make their points very early and very often:  The usual targets--the upper class thought the War was more triumph for Britannia, the generals were out-of-touch lunatics, the soldiers knew they were on death-row--all seemed to be handled better and with more acidic satire (and just as much revisionist preachiness) in BBC's "Blackadder Goes Forth" Britcom, and I found old Rowan Atkinson lines from the show springing to mind in between just a historical songbook of little-known tunes.

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M Squad - Season Two (1958-1959)

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Lee Marvin returns as Detective Lieutenant Frank Ballinger of the Chicago PD, M Squad division. He's still fighting crime and cracking heads, this time for a whopping 40 episodes. The only real changes from the first season are Paul Newlan getting credited as Ballinger's captain, and a jazzy new theme song courtesy of Count Basie. Among my favorite episodes of the season was #15, "The Teacher" featuring Tom Laughlin (Billy Jack) as the crazed leader of a gang of hoods at a trade school. It's up to decent student Burt Reynolds (22 years old but already looking 35, and in his first large speaking role) to bring Laughlin down. I also really liked #29, "The Fire Makers" with James Coburn and Leonard Nimoy as brothers in the arson-for-hire business. Nimoy is a short-tempered menace, a stark contrast to the later Spock.

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Midnight Offerings (1981)  -  5/10

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TV movie with Mary Beth McDonough (from The Waltons) as the new girl in school, and who secretly has psychic powers. She runs up against Melissa Sue Anderson (from Little House on the Prairie), the school's alpha female, who also secretly has psychic powers. However, Melissa augments her abilities with an unhealthy dose of demon worship and black magic ritual. The two gals fight over Patrick Cassidy (from Midnight Offerings), who's the quarterback on the football team and who has skinny legs. Also featuring Marion Ross (from Happy Days) as an expert on all things psychic and supernatural, Gordon Jump (from WKRP in Cincinnati) and Cathryn Damon (from Soap) as Melissa's parents, and Vanna White (from Wheel of Fortune) as a cheerleader. This is as silly as it sounds, but it can be fun if you're in the right mood. I was, sort of. I liked the bad early-80's hair and fashion.

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13 hours ago, EricJ said:

Lord Richard Attenborough (snipped) one of the most frustratingly pedestrian directors in the business, who directs like he's flipping pages through the script, without any sense that there's some ultimate goal to the story

Wow you nailed that one. Just so you don't feel alone- I didn't like GHANDI at all and only liked CHAPLIN for Downey's excellent performance.

I am familiar with both life stories from personal research, so I figured that was my problem, not the directing. But you're right, Attenborough's films seem to meandering aimlessly.

I will add, TikiKid is a big Chaplin fan and I showed her CHAPLIN when she was about 16-17 and she was enraptured.

14 hours ago, EricJ said:

Assuming you're talking about "Movie Movie" (1978), it was a product of what I refer to as "the Carol Burnett Show 70's", when audiences liked to trivialize "Old late-night movies" for their naive cuteness, but hadn't actually seen enough of them to make specific jokes about them.

OK I find your comments a little harsh.

I tend to think yes, those writing & performing on the show had seen these classic films they parodied, as well as many in the audience. Remember the early days of TV were a hotbed of classic movie shows-many locally produced- using rental packages of "old movies". Studios made pure profit from renting already-made-product.

I grew up 1965-75 and saw a LOT of my first movies on TV like Abbott & Costello, Hope & Crosby, Busby Berkeley, Cagney, etc after school. And Saturdays were for "Monster Matinee". It didn't matter that you only saw ONE Busby Berkeley or Fred/Ginger or Shirley Temple musical, they were pretty much formulaic & the same.

But yeas, I get your point that the "quaint culture of yesteryear" was ridiculed in the 70's. The 70's was was when the expression "camp" was created.

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21 hours ago, kingrat said:

"Another part of the forest" is a stage direction from a Shakespeare play, possibly As You Like It, and Lillian Hellman thought of it as a title for her prequel.

It's historically accurate that some Confederates went to Brazil after the Civil War to continue living in a slave-owning society, and this seems like a great subject for fiction and movies.

 

again, i thank you for pointing this out IN RE: ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST

i am stealing it and making it a minor plot point in a novel-within-a-story that I am working on (and am terrifyingly close to finishing, whether i like it or not.)

again, the irony of someone devoting (and risking) their life in order to protect the rights of others...to deny the rights of others is just so delicious. I mean, sure, you could stay in your own country and take care of your damned looney family and just grow peanuts or beans, or even jack the price of salt up on your neighbors and make a profit, but no- you go fullspeed tilt at that racist windwill, you go Dream that Impossible (and morally repugnant) Dream, you Racist Don Quixote. CHARGE ON! (AND MAKE SURE TO NOT WEAR A HELMET WHILE YOU'RE AT IT, HELMETS ARE FOR NORTHERN AGGRESSORS!)

I swear to God, white people are my people, but I am totally missing that "desire to suppress" set of chromosones in my DNA strand. Must be recessive.

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Why is it only girls that have the "secret psychic powers"?  I know, it probably is meant to have something to do with the onset of menstruation.  Are there any films with psychic-empowered boys?  (And I don't mean Damien).

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Kirk Douglas' son in The Fury?

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28 minutes ago, RoyCronin said:

Why is it only girls that have the "secret psychic powers"?  I know, it probably is meant to have something to do with the onset of menstruation.  Are there any films with psychic-empowered boys?  (And I don't mean Damien).

REDRUM!

REDRUM!

DANNY ISN'T HERE MRS. TORRANCE.

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it was apparently a SUPERMOON the other night, and I have been SUPERMOODY of late, and my HULU knows me, so it loaded up TOMORROW: THE WORLD! (1944) right after ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST and I watched it for the ninth (or so) time and cackled like WITCH HAZEL from start to end.

if my LIFE DEPENDED ON IT I COULD NOT WATCH THIS MOVIE WITH A STRAIGHT FACE FOR LONGER THAN A MINUTE AND A HALF.

i love it SO.

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i apologize for an earlier mis-statement where I claimed PRISCILLA LANE was in the love-interest part, she's not. It's BETTY FIELD, sporting what HAS to be the MOST AGGRESSIVE PERM I have seen in a forties film.

Betty, Honey, you're not wearing that hair, that hair is wearing you...

 

it's worth noting that the two juvenile leads besides SKIPPY HOMIER are really great- very likeable and natural- although both REALLY a little hard to buy:

but in the end, IT'S SKIPPY WHO WINS MY HEART:

field-homeier.jpg makeover time!

He reminds me quite a bit of my younger self, minus the whole "Master Race" thing and plus an argyle sweater vest and some clear nail polish.

i wish like anything they had turned this into a MAISIE/ MEXICAN SPITFIRE/ ANDY HARDY sort of film series as we see EMIL THE WUNDERNAZI assimilate to life in the GOOD OLE U ESS OF A. a HALLOWEEN installment where he sports a red satin devil costume would be too too divine.

The only way I could love this movie more is if he wore a tiny little monocle.

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2 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

Why is it only girls that have the "secret psychic powers"?  I know, it probably is meant to have something to do with the onset of menstruation.  Are there any films with psychic-empowered boys?  (And I don't mean Damien).

And, least we forget...

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Wow you nailed that one. Just so you don't feel alone- I didn't like GHANDI at all and only liked CHAPLIN for Downey's excellent performance.

I am familiar with both life stories from personal research, so I figured that was my problem, not the directing. But you're right, Attenborough's films seem to meandering aimlessly.

And I'd seen the original BBC Joss Ackland version of Shadowlands, and while Attenborough's 1993 Anthony Hopkins version was pleasant and all, it left me thinking, "Why did they make this??"

Quote

But yeas, I get your point that the "quaint culture of yesteryear" was ridiculed in the 70's. The 70's was was when the expression "camp" was created.

Generally, in the 70's, there was a lot of "Old-movie parody/homage", some of it caused by the new mania for "That's Entertainment", and some by our troubled Nixon-era 70's picking on happy innocent TV icons for the crime of being clueless and mainstream, one of which icons was late-nite movies with local used-car ads.  Even in late-60's/early-70's movies, when revival theaters were still around, movies and TV shows depicted revival-theater audiences as either a place for the bums to hang out during the day, except for one or two naive mousy dreamers who couldn't handle the modern world, and just sat watching Fred & Ginger all afternoon.  (Qv. Woody Allen's character in "Play It Again, Sam".)
At that time, if you said "Old movies", people literally thought there were only seven of them ever made:  The Maltese Falcon, Stagecoach, Frankenstein, Angels With Dirty Faces, King Kong, Dawn Patrol, and Swing Time, only in color, with Busby Berkeley bathing-beauties doing leg patterns like in 42nd St...Oh, and something with the Keystone Kops throwing a pie fight.

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The only real problem with "Tomorrow, The World" is its' "happy ending".

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"Alice" - Woody Allen - 1990 -

starring Mia Farrow, William Hurt, Joe Mantegna, Keye Luke, etc. -

A strange film, even from Woody Allen, about a married woman's spiritual/mystical journey throughout the latter part of her marriage -

once she visits a Chinese herbalist (in Chinatown), life becomes "surreal" indeed -

she becomes more aggressive, can make herself "invisible" and can materialize a lost lover -

suddenly, she sees possibilities that she has never seen before -

and, of course, is emboldened to change her life -

she moves to India with her two children and adopts the lifestyle of Mother Theresa -

(no, I am not kidding!) -

(and Woody Allen keeps a straight face throughout the entire film) -

a beautiful and haunting performamce from Mia Farrow - 

and solid ones from the various men in her life - 

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43 minutes ago, rayban said:

The only real problem with "Tomorrow, The World" is its' "happy ending".

To be fair, the Allies did win the war.  ;)

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Man with a Camera - Season One (1958-1959)

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Charles Bronson stars in this half-hour TV series that aired on ABC. He plays a freelance photographer who gets mixed up in various troubles while looking for his next photo subject. These include celebrities in trouble, a boxer dealing with crooked fight fixers, a deaf girl who witnessed a murder, an angry mob on a hot night looking to kill a guy, con artists, death row prisoners, and even trips to Portugal and Rome. The only other recurring cast member was Ludwig Stossel as Bronson's immigrant father. The guest cast included Angie Dickinson, Tom Laughlin, Ruta Lee, Frank Faylen, Grant Williams, Audrey Dalton, Yvette Vickers, and Harry Dean Stanton. William Castle directed one of the 15 episodes.

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3 hours ago, rayban said:

The only real problem with "Tomorrow, The World" is its' "happy ending".

As with other films, Tomorrow the World is very much a product of its time. But it still possesses a potent power, at times.

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Blood Song aka Dream Slayer (1982)  -  4/10

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Crippled high school girl Marion (Donna Wilkes, star of 80's exploitation classic Angel) begins having strange dreams that are actually psychic visions of the murderous activities of escaped mental patient and homicidal maniac Paul (Frankie Avalon!!!). It seems they formed a psychic bond when she received some of his blood during a transfusion. Now he's determined to make her his next victim. Also featuring William Kirby Cullen as Marion's boyfriend, Richard Jaeckel and Antoinette Bower as her parents, Dane Clark as the town sheriff, and Lenny Montana (who also gets a screenplay credit!!!) as "Skipper". This will appeal to both fans of Frankie Avalon, who have never seen him in a role like this before, as well as to those hate him, as they'll enjoy the going over he receives in the finals last act. Avalon's weapon of choice is a really small hatchet, which makes things even sillier. This was the last acting role of former pro wrestler and reputed mob heavy Montana, who most know from role as Luca Brasi in The Godfather. Filmed in and around Coos Bay and North Bend, Oregon.

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Burned at the Stake aka The Coming (1982)  -  5/10

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From writer-producer-director Bert I. Gordon, this supernatural horror tale stars Susan Swift as a 12-year-old girl living in modern day Salem, Massachusetts. She learns that she's the reincarnation of a young girl responsible for the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. When she visits the Witch museum, it awakens the memories of her past life, as well as transporting William Goode (David Rounds), the father of a wrongfully accused girl, into the present. As Susan acts stranger and stranger, an evil presence also makes itself known. Featuring Tisha Sterling as Susan's mom, Guy Stockwell as the family doctor, Albert Salmi as the police chief, John Peters, Jennine Babo, and Beverly Ross. This was better written than many similar films that I've watched recently, and Susan Swift (of Audrey Rose fame) is good in the lead role. My main complaint would be that the cinematography, or the print that I saw, or both, was too dark to make out much of the action for a greater part of the film.

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12 hours ago, rayban said:

A strange film, even from Woody Allen, about a married woman's spiritual/mystical journey throughout the latter part of her marriage -

Glad you liked ALICE. It was weird, but I enjoyed it too-especially Farrow's performance which you mentioned.

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Also featuring William Kirby Cullen as Marion's boyfriend

I think he was a bit old for her:

5d514fdf2b6d3cfde17e59950938dad8--bill-c

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If anyone wants to watch an extraordinarily stupid, mid 80s British Syfy Golan-Globus produced wreck of a movie, LIFEFORCE was on TCM underground last night. 

Its....really something. Just a profoundly confounding movie...It also has a real penchant for telling us about major events that happened in as opposed to showing them. In spite of the fact that it obviously had a budget. And a relatively competent director....?Although Tobe Hooper is reaching into the same bag of tricks he used in some of his earlier efforts (They try to copy the score for “poltergeist”, and it totally does not fit the action and tone of the film.)

It’s worth noting the Patrick Stewart has a small role and he looks exactly the same as he does now.

I guess theres supposed to be a twist at the end. But by the time they got to it I totally did not care.

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