speedracer5

I Just Watched...

21,495 posts in this topic

Tomorrow, the World! (1944)

This movie features Fredric March taking in his Hitler Youth nephew and trying to help him let go of his Nazi beliefs.  This was an interesting look into anti-Nazi propaganda.  Skip Homeier makes his film debut as Emil, the young German nephew of March's character, Mike Frame.  Emil arrives at the Frame home in an old suit.  When the family sits down for lunch, Mike asks Emil to change his clothes.  Emil comes out donning his Hitler Youth uniform, complete with swastika.  He immediately goes to work trying to recruit Mike's German maid into following his Nazi beliefs.  Joan Carroll plays Mike's daughter, Pat, who immediately takes cousin Emil under her wing and tries to help him make friends with her classmates.  It does not go well, especially when Emil meets Pat's classmate, Stan Dombrowski whose Polish name elicits hateful comments from Emil.  Another one of Pat's friends, Milly, has a father who is a POW in a concentration camp in Germany.  Betty Field portrays March's Jewish fiancee, Leona Richards, who is also Emil and Pat's teacher.  Emil is especially cruel to Leona.  Agnes Moorehead rounds out the cast as March's sister, Jessie, who is taken aback when she hears of Mike and Leona's impending marriage.  Emil senses that Jessie doesn't like Leona either and attempts to manipulate her into following his belief system.

I found Emil's pre-pubescent voice off-putting at first, but quickly found it amusing when in the context of his hateful, over the top behavior.  He is so outrageous and over-the-top in this film to the point where it's more funny than the serious propaganda I'm sure it was intended to be.  I think my favorite part was when Pat's friends beat the crap out of him.  I found Emil's sudden change in personality a little unrealistic, but I suppose we have to hope that there is an iota of hope in this boy and that he can go on to lead a better life with March serving as his father figure.  Hopefully he can evolve from his Hitler Youth upbringing. 

I enjoyed watching this film, but I do not think this is a film I would need to watch again and again.

---

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

I saw this film on Wednesday as part of the TCM Fathom events.  While I read the book in high school (and loved it.  Probably the only book, aside from The Great Gatsby, that we had to read that I liked!), I had never seen the film.  I loved this movie.

Phillip Alford and Mary Badham were fantastic as Jem and Scout Finch.  I'm not typically a fan of child actors, as they're usually either too cute (e.g. catch phrases and obnoxious one-liners) or they're overly precocious and snotty.  I do love it when kids seem like real kids, like how Jem and Scout were portrayed in the film.  This film was very much a coming of age story with the adult Scout character looking back at a pivotal time in her childhood in the early 1930s.  The ongoing tale of Boo Radley was especially captivating.  There always seems to be "that neighbor" whom the kids tell tall tales about and the neighbor becomes a legend for whatever traits the kids perceive them to have.

Gregory Peck was fantastic as Atticus Finch.  I like Peck, but sometimes he can be a bit wooden, I think it's because of his deep voice.  However, he was born for this part.  Atticus was such a great protagonist and complex character.  While the courthouse scene was amazing, I especially enjoyed the quieter scenes of Atticus comforting daughter Scout on the porch and giving her lessons, such as having to walk in another person's shoes in order to understand their viewpoint.  That's such a great lesson in empathy and not passing judgement.  The other scene that I thought was interesting was the scene where Atticus sets up shop in front of the jail when he gets word that the cruel Mr. Ewell, husband to the plaintiff in client Tom Robinson's rape trial, has rallied some of the neighbors to attack Robinson.  The scene where the children refuse to leave the scene, forcing some of the neighbors to find their humanity was very powerful. 

Brock Peters was amazing as Tom Robinson.  His emotional testimony was heartbreaking.  Even though I'd read the book, I'd forgotten the outcome of the trial.  Hearing the verdict was especially heart wrenching.

The scene with Scout walking around as the ham was funny.  The scenes with Boo were poignant and very well done.

I absolutely loved this film and would watch it again in a heartbeat.  The acting was excellent, the cinematography was gorgeous.  Everything you'd want in a film was in To Kill a Mockingbird

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aquaman (2018)  -  7/10

Aquaman_poster.jpg

Unremittingly silly superhero fantasy with Jason Momoa as the half-human/half-Atlantean hero who can talk to the creatures of the sea. He must stop his Altantean half-brother Orm (Patrick Wilson) from starting a war with the surface world. Featuring Amber Heard, Willem Dafoe, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Nicole Kidman, Dolph Lundgren, Temuera Morrison, Ludi Lin, Michael Beach, Randall Park, and the voice of Julie Andrews. The characters are comic-book archetypes, and the plot is more than a little sloppy, but the movie is visually fascinating, with dozens of unique creatures, ancient-ruin landscapes, and neon-colored cities. The design verve alone makes it worth seeing, just don't expect a story much more nuanced than a Saturday matinee serial. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Demon Murder Case (1983)  -  4/10

"Based on a true story" supernatural TV movie featuring Kevin Bacon on trial. Flashbacks reveal his backstory, and how he and his fiancee (Liane Langland) were present when her little brother (Charlie Fields) became possessed by a demon. Featuring Andy Griffith as a paranormal investigator, and Beverlee McKinsey as his psychic wife, Cloris Leachman and Ken Kercheval as rival reporters, Eddie Albert as a priest, Joyce Van Patten, Peter Gerety, Richard Masur, and Harvey Fierstein (in his movie debut) as the voice of the demon.

Think I remember that--Seemed like perfect voice casting.  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DUMBO (2019) *Score: 7/10* 

Starring: Danny DeVito, Colin Farrell, Michael Keaton, Eva Green, Alan Arkin, Nico Parker, Finley Hobbins. 

I saw this last night in theaters, and was not disappointed. I think this is Tim Burton's best work as of recent years. I enjoyed the little Easter eggs included in the film, and I think this was a wonderful tribute to the original. I tend to flip-flop between enjoying these live-action adaptations/prequels, and staring in disbelief at the horror I am witnessing (Cinderella, Pete's Dragon, Jungle Book). Okay, maybe "horror" isn't the correct word here, but you get the point. Some of Disney's remakes/sequels/prequels are enjoyable, and some seem to fall short. They don't seem to accurately capture the magic of the originals. 

That being said, I thought the special effects and sets/costumes were great, as per usual. I am a fan of DeVito, Keaton, and Green; they did not disappoint. It was nice to hear Eva Green speak in her native French accent for once. 

Danny Elfman (another personal favorite of mine) did the music. Some of the music was similar to the original, but with his own little twist to them, which I thought was quite refreshing. There were also some similarities between this one and the original, but this one was slightly different. I like that. I think it's nice when the remakes aren't shot-for-shot identical to the original source material. 

Related image

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturday Night Slasher-a-thon!

 

Final Exam (1981)  -  4/10

220px-Final_exam_poster.jpg

A random killer attacks co-eds at a college while most of the students, faculty and staff are away for holiday. Starring a lot of people you've never heard of, although Joel S. Rice, who plays the nerd character, went on to produce a lot of Hallmark Channel movies. The filmmakers decided to focus more on character than suspense or gruesome murders, with the result being boredom. The killer isn't a masked villain, and his background is never explained. He's just some hefty fella who likes killin' people, I guess. Filmed in North Carolina.

 

Night School (1981)  -  4/10

220px-Night_School_FilmPoster.jpeg

A mysterious killer, face obscured by a motorcycle helmet, is decapitating women. Boston PD detective Leonard Mann investigates, with the clues leading to an eccentric professor (Drew Snyder) at a women's college. The professor's girlfriend (Rachel Ward), an intense exchange student, appears to be the next target. This movie is more like an Italian giallo mystery than an American slasher flick. While it's much more slickly made than Final Exam, it's unfortunately very predictable and I grew bored long before it was over. However, Ward is gorgeous, so there's that. Filmed in Massachusetts.

 

The Mutilator aka Fall Break (1984)  -  5/10

220px-Mutilatorposter.jpg

A group of college friends on break travel to the beachfront condo belonging to the father of one of them. Unfortunately for them, the father has lost his marbles and goes on a murder spree using a variety of sharp implements. This one also features a lot of people that you don't know. It's easily the goriest as well, with a couple of scenes too graphic to describe and among the most outrageous things ever seen in the genre. Filmed in South Carolina.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to all for their reviews - they are always enlightening and inspire adventurousness outside my typical fave genres.

👽

That said, last night's family movie was a surprise. Someone (whom I often agree with/respect) was speaking of Dyan Cannon and mentioned they liked  SUCH GOOD FRIENDS '71. My library had it so I figured might be a fun departure, it had bonus of Otto Preminger directing. 

While I feel Preminger as director kind of spun out of control (Skidoo) his work is always interesting, intriguing and often benefits from multiple viewings. 

SUCH GOOD FRIENDS falls within that category. A mod housewife's (career unclear) slice of life kind of story, with extreme high/low situations involving relationships & infidelity with beautiful but mostly repugnant people. A few bold, bizarre LOL moments of events happening in her mind- one an aged Burgess Meredith dancing completely nude wearing only a g-string holding his newly published book strategically placed! I like those kind of visual/mental/emotional escapades.

When the movie ended, we were both smiling, so obviously we liked it. But it's quirky weird and certainly not for everyone, it's often a raw look at sex/love/life helped by a talented cast. MrTiki was shocked at young Doris Roberts while I enjoyed seeing Nina Foch even though she played an awful character! I was surprised when MrTiki mentioned he liked the legs logo! (I do too, cute)

220px-SuchGoodFriendsPoster.jpg

I also borrowed THE LAST OF SHIELA for Sat night movie next week.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks to all for their reviews - they are always enlightening and inspire adventurousness outside my typical fave genres.

 

Thanks to your recommendation, TikiSoo, I hunted down and thoroughly enjoyed watching TUCKER THE MAN AND HIS DREAMS. A very positive, upbeat film based upon the true story of Preston Tucker who dared, with his Tucker Sedan, to take on the Big 3 in the automobile manufacturing business. Most enjoyable, with great performances from Jeff Bridges and Martin Landau, in particular. Fun to see Jeff's Dad, Lloyd, in a small role as an oily senator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stan & Ollie.  

I watched this film last night.  It featured John C. Reilly as Oliver Hardy and Steve Coogan as Stan Laurel.  The film took place during the early 1950s when Laurel and Hardy were embarking on a tour in the United Kingdom.  They perform in near-empty music halls in Ireland and Scotland before reaching London.  Prior to reaching London, Laurel and Hardy's manager has them participate in some stunts to drum up more publicity for their shows.  Soon, the shows are sold out and Laurel and Hardy are performing in much more prestigious venues. 

There are a couple of main conflicts: 1) Laurel and Hardy are only performing these shows in order to secure financing for their next film, a comedic adaptation of Robin Hood; and 2) Laurel still harbors resentment against Hardy for making films without him after Laurel refuses to renew his contract with Hal Roach and is consequently fired.  Hardy on the other hand, was still under contract and made Zenobia without Laurel.  Laurel felt that Hardy should have stood up to Roach more and protect their partnership.  Laurel's issue with Roach is that he felt that Roach wasn't doing enough to capitalize on Laurel and Hardy's fame and popularity. 

During this strenuous tour, we see Laurel and Hardy perform stunts on stage and at points, go through the motions of the show, despite being unhappy.  Hardy's health is also failing, which further puts their future in jeopardy.

This was a great film and an interesting look at a period of Laurel and Hardy's career that I wasn't too familiar with.  It was interesting to see how Zenobia came about.  The film ends on a rather bittersweet note.  

The film starts in 1937, during the filming of Way Out West, and introduces Laurel's contract dispute with Hal Roach and consequently the beginning of the resentment he harbors against Hardy.  The rest of the action takes place in the early 1950s during Laurel and Hardy's UK tour.  My husband says he wishes that the film would have included some more background information, such as how Laurel and Hardy got together in the first place.  

While I enjoyed Stan & Ollie, I don't know if it's a film I'd have to watch over and over again.  It had an underlying note of sadness that I'm not sure I'd need to revisit.  However, this definitely makes me want to watch more of the original Laurel and Hardy.  I have six of their films recorded: Babes in Toyland, Way Out West, Sons of the Desert, Swiss Miss, Pack Up Your Troubles, Air Raid Wardens and A Chump at Oxford.  I also have The Music Box which I have saved on the DVR and have watched multiple times.  I also recorded the notorious Zenobia which I think would be interesting to look at.  Perhaps when I come back from vacation, I may order the Laurel & Hardy boxed set on Amazon.  It's 50% off right now. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man with a Camera - Season Two (1959-1960)

a63e291775f557ddd8c3237e5685f345.jpg

Second and final season of the drama series, running 14 half-hour episodes. Charles Bronson stars as Mike Kovac, freelance photographer. This season sees him occasionally working for insurance companies and directly with the police. Ludwig Stossel as his father was dropped from the show, while James Flavin, as ill-tempered police contact Lt. Donovan, was introduced on a recurring basis. Guest stars included Steve Brodie, Sebastian Cabot, Don Gordon, and Anthony Caruso, among others. One of the better episodes sees Mike working with young novice photographer Yvonne Craig to stop homicidal ice cream salesman/dope peddler Lawrence Tierney. Craig's character seems to be set up by episode's end as a new regular addition to the show, with Bronson referring to her as his new assistant, but she didn't appear in the remaining two episodes before the series was canceled.

4f6ef598e188dbc695e01fe757949da4.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched FINAL EXAM too; For some reason NIGHT SCHOOL did not up in my HULU feed. 

I caught the scent of North Carolina on this about 15 minutes in, I also sensed a community college vibe to the setting and a trip to ImDB after watching the movie confirmed my suspicions. 

It was stupid as hell, the music wasn’t too bad, and it had a watchable quality to it

I also enjoy watching these for the glimpses of nostalgia they provide, for example I had forgotten all about how vending machines used to look like furniture with vinyl wood fronts and six long rectangular buttons on the top for your choices.

The mass shooting scene was too stupid for words, but it was still an interesting...footnote In a movie that is in it of itself pretty much a footnote.

Although it will score with fans of saggy, dumpy, white BVD underpants.

(I know there’s got to be some of you out there.)

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PS Re FINAL EXAM

my god there is an AWFUL scene of a professor having an affair with a student who is talking about his dumpy, awful redheaded wife back at home. I really wish that the dumpy redheaded wife had been the serial killer of the film instead of the guy they got, who looks like like a really friendly dude who lives in a van down by the river And will totally sell you weed with only a $10 minimum.

As far as I was concerned, The Killer was the hero. He was the one genuinely likable character

He seemed quite frankly like an awesome guy to hang out with.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Beale Street Could Talk (2018)  -  7/10

220px-If_Beale_Street_Could_Talk_film.pn

70's-set drama based on James Baldwin's novel. 19-year-old Tish (KiKi Layne) learns that she is pregnant soon after her fiancee Fonny (Stephan James) is wrongfully arrested for sexual assault. Tish does what she can to raise money for his legal defense while also struggling to hold off on the birth of their child until Fonny is a free man once again. Flashbacks also reveal Tish and Fonny's courtship. Also featuring Regina Taylor, Colman Domingo, Michael Beach, Aujanue Ellis, Brian Tyree Henry, Teyonah Parris, Emily Rios, Diego Luna, Ed Skrein, Dave Franco, Finn Wittrock, and Pedro Pascal. Director and screenwriter Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) imbues his film with impressive production values, including evocative cinematography and dense sound design. His characters also exhibit an unusual humanism that adds weight to even the most mundane of events. Jenkins occasionally lapses into arty pretentiousness, but not as much as in his previous film, in my opinion. King won the Supporting Actress Oscar for her non-flashy role as Tish's compassionate mother. She's come a long way since I first noticed her, playing Marla Gibbs' daughter on the TV series 227.

regina2.jpg?w=620&h=360&crop=1

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

DUMBO (2019) *Score: 7/10* 

Starring: Danny DeVito, Colin Farrell, Michael Keaton, Eva Green, Alan Arkin, Nico Parker, Finley Hobbins. 

I saw this last night in theaters, and was not disappointed. I think this is Tim Burton's best work as of recent years. I enjoyed the little Easter eggs included in the film, and I think this was a wonderful tribute to the original. I tend to flip-flop between enjoying these live-action adaptations/prequels, and staring in disbelief at the horror I am witnessing (Cinderella, Pete's Dragon, Jungle Book). Okay, maybe "horror" isn't the correct word here, but you get the point. Some of Disney's remakes/sequels/prequels are enjoyable, and some seem to fall short. They don't seem to accurately capture the magic of the originals.  

That being said, I thought the special effects and sets/costumes were great, as per usual. I am a fan of DeVito, Keaton, and Green; they did not disappoint. It was nice to hear Eva Green speak in her native French accent for once. 

Danny Elfman (another personal favorite of mine) did the music. Some of the music was similar to the original, but with his own little twist to them, which I thought was quite refreshing. There were also some similarities between this one and the original, but this one was slightly different. I like that. I think it's nice when the remakes aren't shot-for-shot identical to the original source material.  

Thanks  for a viewpoint from the TCM message board crowd. The younger set over on reddit (and for all I know you are in the younger set too) seemed to not like it so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cold War (2018)  - 6/10

220px-Cold_War_(2018_film).jpg

Gloomy Polish romantic drama from writer-director Pawel Pawilkowski. The tortured relationship between older musician Wiktor (Tomasz Kot) and young, troubled singer Zula (Joanna Kulig) is traced, from it's beginnings in post-WWII Poland, to jaunts back and forth through the Iron Curtain in the 1950's, each reunion leaving them both more damaged than before. Also featuring Borys Szyc, Cedric Kahn, and Agata Kulesza. The 4:3, B&W cinematography is at times beautiful and visually lyrical, and perfectly accents both the coldness of the forlorn lovers and the frigid surroundings they sometimes find themselves in. The performances by Kot and Kulig are good, particularly the latter. The movie is a relentless downer, though, and while I seldom mind that, as I'm a relentless downer myself, within this context it left me dispassionate about the central characters as well as frequently feeling bored, despite the relatively brief 88 minute running time. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, calvinnme said:

Thanks  for a viewpoint from the TCM message board crowd. The younger set over on reddit (and for all I know you are in the younger set too) seemed to not like it so much.

Haha, you assume correctly, calvinnme. I'm 22, so definitely in the "younger set." I'm of the opinion that younger people who didn't like it, either haven't seen the original at all, or they don't have an appreciation for the original. I was entertained, and that's really all I ask from a movie. Is it the best thing I've seen this year? Not by a long-shot, but it was entertaining and fun. 

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

younger people who didn't like it, either haven't seen the original at all, or they don't have an appreciation for the original.

Hi N&N34....do you really think one movie should rely on another?

Even sequels are best if they stand well on their own-example: Father's Little Dividend (about a firstborn grandchild) is it's own movie, separate from being a sequel to Father Of The Bride, (about the daughter's wedding) Same charactors, told in the same way, but different story.

This new Dumbo brings up the age old question, "If the original was really a great movie that effected/touched many, what can a remake improve upon?" The answer in this new Dumbo's case is a CGI live action version is supposedly an improvement over Disney's golden age hand drawn animation. Otherwise, should be the same story. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dumbo, along with Bambi, were apparently Walt Disney's two favourites films of those he produced.

In the Disney original Dumbo is a victim of gossip and bullying (some things are eternal). He's also considered to be a "freak." The scene in which you see the little fellow by himself, rocking back and forth, with tears flowing down his trunk, can still move me. The magic of those animators, magnificently capturing feelings of anguish and sorrow with which we can identify.

e23c0b23-e111-4d98-aa39-9a97df4351c6.gif

09868c87fe69a5ed51434856351d2155.gif

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/30/2019 at 2:02 PM, speedracer5 said:

Tomorrow, the World! (1944)

I enjoyed watching this film, but I do not think this is a film I would need to watch again and again.

whereas I could watch it on loop for 36 hours straight, and probably die happily from lack of oxygen because of all the laughing.

diff'rent strokes and all...

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i watched SHADOWS ON THE STAIRS (1941) on TCM on HULU- it's an awfully British WB murder mystery programmer which features three actors from one of my favorite films of the 1940s- RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE. FRIEDA INESCORT- who shows up in stuff all the time and was a very interesting actress for many reasons- has the de facto lead as a declasse landlady with a perm, she has a standout scene where she discovers her lover has been murdered, it's one of the most believable portrayals of shock I've seen in a classic movie.

the ending may disappoint some, but it fooled me, so hat's off to it and all.

TURHAN BEY is also in this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yesterday morning I watched THIS IS SPINAL TAP (note, my keyboard does not allow for proper umlaut placement) on TCM on HULU.

i'd seen it before, but it's been a while. to this day, the title SMELL THE GLOVE still gets a giggle out of me me...maybe someday it will cease to be funny but til then....hee hee hee

this movie is an example of truly great ensemble acting (HARRY SHEARER'S British accent aside)- the twisted love triangle between the LINDA MCCARTNEY-esque groupie/road manager and MICHAEL MCKEAN and CHRISTOPHER GUEST's characters is just so well done- subtle, right there in front of us but never openly addressed- it's like something out of a SIRK movie, if DOUGLAS SIRK used herpes sores as unspoken plot device.

FRAN DRESCHER- who has never been a favorite- has a standout scene as Record company PR woman BOBBI FLECKMAN, she has to joylessly describe the sadistic, sexist cover of one of their albums in a way that is believable yet funny, and she does a great job.

I would recommend this, but for some reason it was pulled from the TCM ON HULU line-up immediately after I watched it, which is odd, because stuff stays available for 7 days usually.

 

EDIT- WENT TO WIKI AND FOUND THIS, WONDER IF THIS COULD BE A REASON:

Lawsuit

On October 17, 2016, actor Harry Shearer filed a $125 million lawsuit against both StudioCanal, the successor in interest to Embassy Pictures, and Vivendi, which owns the studio. Shearer's lawsuit was specifically directed at StudioCanal by ordering the studio to terminate the copyright to This Is Spinal Tap.[43] In February 2017, Shearer's co-stars Christopher Guest and Michael McKean, as well as the film's director Rob Reiner, joined the lawsuit against StudioCanal and Vivendi, seeking $400 million in damages.[44] In the same month, Vivendi made an attempt to motion to the court to dismiss the case.[45] In September 2017, a judge dismissed Shearer, Reiner and McKean from the case.[46] In October 2017, Spinal Tap revised their case by adding Universal Music Group (another division of Vivendi, whose Polydor label released the film's soundtrack) as a defendant, as well as the right to reclaim their copyrights to the film, its songs and characters.[47]

In August 2018, Judge Dolly Gee ruled that Guest, Reiner, McKean and Shearer may pursue the fraud claim against Vivendi.[48]

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Although I watched I Love Melvin this morning (charming film), one thought came to mind while rewatching part of It Started with a Kiss. The film has a scene where Debbie Reynolds gets very tipsy on a wine tasting tour. I call that scene exhibit A as to why they aren't cross-over chapters of the TCM Wine Club and Backlot. Could get a bit dangerous there.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Hi N&N34....do you really think one movie should rely on another?

Even sequels are best if they stand well on their own-example: Father's Little Dividend (about a firstborn grandchild) is it's own movie, separate from being a sequel to Father Of The Bride, (about the daughter's wedding) Same charactors, told in the same way, but different story.

This new Dumbo brings up the age old question, "If the original was really a great movie that effected/touched many, what can a remake improve upon?" The answer in this new Dumbo's case is a CGI live action version is supposedly an improvement over Disney's golden age hand drawn animation. Otherwise, should be the same story. 

I guess not in all cases. Some movies do well relying on each other. I think Disney's "Christopher Robin" was a nice little addition to the Winnie the Pooh series. Not everyone has to like the remakes/sequels that Disney has been doing lately. I'm honestly not a fan of their decision (and Pixar's) to do a fourth Toy Story movie. The 3rd one wrapped up the series quite well, in my opinion. I think Disney is trying to say that their older movies "need to be remade" to "touch today's generations," but I disagree to an extent. I love Disney, but I feel like it's a play on nostalgia to make money. That being said, I still will go and see the remakes. Partially because I am fond of the movies, but also because I feel like it's a fun experience to go see things in theaters. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I love Disney, but I feel like it's a play on nostalgia to make money. 

This, 100%.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I love Disney, but I feel like it's a play on nostalgia to make money. That being said, I still will go and see the remakes. Partially because I am fond of the movies, but also because I feel like it's a fun experience to go see things in theaters. 

Sadly, it's more than that:
Studios in the 10's have now been persuaded (ahemwarner) into believing that the business is now all about creating Franchises out of past existing identifiable audience hits, as "Brand names".  It hasn't worked out, of course--did anyone even see Fox's last Aliens and Predator movies??--but until studios and screenwriters start talking again, that's their story and they're sticking to it.

Now, you'd think Disney would be slopping over with recognizable franchises, what with their owning Lucasfilm, Marvel and Pixar (despite the fact that Star Wars and the Avengers' days are already numbered).  And yes, but problem is, castle-Disney doesn't have its OWN franchise that they can exploit--All they have are the animated classics, but after all those cheesy direct-video sequels in the 90's, John Lasseter put a ban on the studio doing any animated sequel to a non-current movie (they can do Frozen, Ralph and Zootopia, but not Dumbo II).

So what loophole do they use to get around this, and franchise-market their past movies anyway?  There's nothing in the fine print that says they can't make LIVE ACTION movies...Except for "Christopher Robin" or "Saving Mr. Banks", which are not so much sequels to the stories, so much as about adults who grew up with the classic Disney characters, and unpreparedly meet them again as grownups who have to get in touch with their inner children again if they want to reconnect with their families.  Hint, freakin' hint.

Disney's still got more live-action adaptations, but they're starting to realize its losing its box-office draw, and they're saving "Sword in the Stone" and "Lady & the Tramp" for their streaming service.  It's only the movies with big bills to pay, like Will Smith in "Aladdin" or all that expensive Jon Favreau CGI in "Lion King", that has to subsidize itself at the theater with $10 tickets.  Yes, and Favreau was cast to direct Lion King for pretty much the same reason Disney hoped Tim Burton could do another LAD and hope "Alice" would happen again after nine years...Oo, let's give Tim the circus-y one, you know how he likes clowns!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us