speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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The Big Operator (1959). Mickey Rooney, Steve Cochran, Mamie Van Doren. First, a pause to

chuckle at the idea of the shrimpish Rooney as a big operator. In the closeups, the Mick's physical

lack of stature is not that noticeable, but in medium shots with everyone standing up, well Rooney

looks like a kid who wandered into the adult's section. Rooney plays the vicious and

crooked head of a union. Steve Cochran and Mel Torme play buddies who are members

of the union. Mel is a guy with a short fuse who is always ready to rumble. Steve spends

most of his time trying to restrain his friend's emotional outbursts. By coincidence they

happen to witness Rooney with a hit man that he shouldn't be seen with. At a

congressional hearing, Rooney pleads the Fifth more often than he got married. At first

he tries to win them over with jobs at the union, but they don't go for that. Then

Mickey has to get tough. Mel is roughed up and then thrown out of a car

in front of his house. Then suddenly the velvet fog is in on fire. Steve puts him out. Then Steve is

kidnapped by Rooney's goons. He gets away only to have Mickey kidnap his son. The cops are

eventually called in after Steve manages to backtrack and find the house where he was held. And

there is Mickey hiding in a closet with Steve's son. Mick is now headed for a long term in the

slammer. Low budget flick keeps things pretty basic but entertaining. To make up for his lack of

physical heft Rooney's character (called Little Joe) struts around with a cigar stuffed in his mouth

yelling orders at his subordinates and being just a mean s.o.b. in general. All in all, it might be

as humorous as it is intimidating. In one classic line after Mel Torme is set aflame, Rooney tells

his goon 'Look, you don't set anyone on fire unless I tell you to.' Okayyy. The stars go through

their paces in general good order with Steve Cochran minus his usual pin stripe suit as Joe

Blue Collar and Mamie playing it subdued as Cochran's bland hausfrau. Mickey's over the top

performance only makes the film more entertaining. Look for the union label...or else.

 

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Mel Torme playing a gangster? LOL. Does he sing?

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6 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Mel Torme playing a gangster? LOL. Does he sing?

Mel was a hot-tempered working stiff. And no singing.

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LOL. I never realized Mel had a movie career (aside from playing himself).

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Marina de Tavira, Marco Graf, Yalitza Aparicio, Daniela Demesa, Diego Cortina Autrey, and Carlos Peralta in Roma (2018)

Roma (2018) entertaining enough, interesting location/sets, beautifully shot 7/10. Not something I'd watch again though.

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12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

yesterday morning I watched THIS IS SPINAL TAP (note, my keyboard does not allow for proper umlaut placement) on TCM on HULU.

i'd seen it before, but it's been a while. to this day, the title SMELL THE GLOVE still gets a giggle out of me me...maybe someday it will cease to be funny but til then....hee hee hee

It's like how much more black could this be? And the answer is none. None more black.

My favorite part is "Big Bottoms" and the part with "Stonehenge" aka tiny Pi symbol.

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9 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

 Although I watched I Love Melvin this morning (charming film), one thought came to mind while rewatching part of It Started with a Kiss. The film has a scene where Debbie Reynolds gets very tipsy on a wine tasting tour. I call that scene exhibit A as to why they aren't cross-over chapters of the TCM Wine Club and Backlot. Could get a bit dangerous there.

If I remember right, that wine tasting tour in It Started with a Kiss is crazy.  I have been to many wine tastings and festivals (I live in Wine Country, after all) and never once have I been given full glasses of wine as a "taste." In It Started with a Kiss, everyone's given full glasses of each wine.  When wine tasting, you have to pay the vineyard/winery's per glass price if you want a whole glass to enjoy--otherwise, you get a couple swallows.  Either Debbie was shelling out a lot of money on this wine tour, or this winery was way too generous with their samples. I wonder if they had any wine left to sell after the wine tastings were over. 

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

If I remember right, that wine tasting tour in It Started with a Kiss is crazy.  I have been to many wine tastings and festivals (I live in Wine Country, after all) and never once have I been given full glasses of wine as a "taste." In It Started with a Kiss, everyone's given full glasses of each wine.  When wine tasting, you have to pay the vineyard/winery's per glass price if you want a whole glass to enjoy--otherwise, you get a couple swallows.  Either Debbie was shelling out a lot of money on this wine tour, or this winery was way too generous with their samples. I wonder if they had any wine left to sell after the wine tastings were over. 

In this particular case, it was Antonio Seriano's(Gustavo Rojo) private wine cellar at his estate(where Maggie(Reynolds) Joe(Ford) and Marion(Gabor) were close friends and guests for the day) and he invited them down there to try his wines in celebration only after he managed to buy out the Lincoln Futura from Joe(Glenn Ford) for $17,500. So he was probably more generous with the amounts provided. Also this was 1959 so maybe the etiquette of wine tasting was different back then. Either way, it's my favorite scene in the movie. 

 

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49 minutes ago, MerryPickford said:

In this particular case, it was Antonio Seriano's(Gustavo Rojo) private wine cellar at his estate(where Maggie(Reynolds) Joe(Ford) and Marion(Gabor) were close friends and guests for the day) and he invited them down there to try his wines in celebration only after he managed to buy out the Lincoln Futura from Joe(Glenn Ford) for $17,500. So he was probably more generous with the amounts provided. Also this was 1959 so maybe the etiquette of wine tasting was different back then. Either way, it's my favorite scene in the movie. 

 

That makes sense.  I've only seen this film once, I must have missed the backstory re: the winery.  I recorded this film when it aired today.  I look forward to seeing it again.

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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

Mel Torme playing a gangster? LOL. Does he sing?

The only singing he would have done is to the feds. In a weird sort of way he was a counterpoint

to Mickey's character, who also had a very short fuse, but was truly deadly. Not what folks think

of as a typical MGM movie, but still pretty enjoyable.

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Amazons (1984)  -  4/10

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TV movie featuring Madeleine Stowe as a D.C.-area surgeon who stumbles upon a plot by modern-day descendants of the fabled amazons to replace men in high-power positions with members of their group. Stowe decides to unravel their schemes with the help of cop Jack Scalia. Also featuring Jennifer Warren, Tamara Dobson, Peter Scolari, Leslie Bevis, William Schallert, Nicholas Pryor, and Stella Stevens. This is ludicrous stuff, and the ease with which Stowe and Scalia thwart the amazons doesn't say much for the group's prowess or planning. Everyone has big hair, and Stowe looks really good.

 

Deadly Messages (1985)  -  6/10

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Kathleen Beller stars as a young woman who witnesses her roommates murder, but when neither the body nor any other evidence can be found, no one believes her. She thinks it has something to do with a Ouija board that she found in her closet, but she isn't prepared for the revelations it brings. Also featuring Michael Brandon as her lawyer boyfriend, Dennis Franz as the disbelieving slob cop, Scott Paulin, Kurtwood Smith, George Wyner, and Charles Tyner. This ended up being better than most of these 80's TV flicks, with an interesting story with a couple of unpredictable plot developments, although the biggest one can be seen a mile ahead. I enjoyed seeing character actor Tyner in a larger-than-usual part as a hotel proprietor. Beller, who I've seen in a few of these TV thrillers lately, is an actress I always thought was beautiful, and she may be at her loveliest in this.

 

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"Fort Dobbs" - 1958 - Gordon Douglas -

starring Clint Walker, Virginia Mayo, Brian Keith and Richard Eyer -

Intriguing Western about a man who is escaping from a lynch mob and then switches identities with a dead man and includes his shirt among his clothing -

he happens upon the widow and her son who are about to be attacked by Indians -

he attempts to take them to safety at Fort Dobbs -

when the widow discovers her husband's shirt, she can only believe that she and her son are traveling with her husband's killer -

she and her son grow increasingly antagonistic -

they are joined by a gunrunner who eventually attempts to rape the woman -

he is tossed out of the traveling party -

when the group gets to Fort Dobbs - it has been destroyed by Indians -

they are joined by a wagon train -

eventually, with the help of the lynch mob, the Indians are sent packing -

our hero, it turns out, is not guilty -

and he, the widow and her son ride off into the sunset -

Clint Walker has a very strong presence in this film -

he's a survivialist - interested only in gettting from one day to another -

he's unselfish and heroic at all times -

no man could be a better protector -

he is ably supported by Virginia Mayo and Richard Eyer, who grow to appreciate his decency -

this film was meant to capitalize on Clint Walker's success in his TV series, "Cheyenne" -

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Us (2019)

Spoilers ahead!

Jordan Peele's new movie is being highly (perhaps overly) praised. I see it as a horror film with all the cliches and tropes of every horror movie ever made, (which may have been his intention). I'm not going to try to describe the plot -- there's plenty of that online -- except to say that a family of colour goes on a vacation to Santa Cruz, where the mother had a weird experience as a little girl. Santa Cruz, of course, means Holy Cross, which provides at least a double entendre for the film. Santa Cruz may also be a surrogate for Santa Mira, the fictional town in Invasion of the Body Snatchers. There are tunnels -- they are important. Brings to mind the underground world of the Morlocks, or C.H.U.D., or a number of other films where dubious creatures live below ground, and it makes them CRAZY!

There is the house-invasion aspect to the script, which actually becomes a bit monotonous. Like the endless fight with the vampires at the truck stop in Quentin Tarantino's script for From Dusk Till Dawn, some of the violence goes on too long. I have nothing against violence in horror films; it just shouldn't go on so long that it becomes boring. There's a thing on the top of the car, as they try to get away. A thing on the top of the car is yet another horror film cliche/trope. There are two husbands who are asked by their wives to look outside, I heard something, but the dim husbands make fun of the wives' concerns. They could just have said what James Mason says to Arlene Dahl in Journey to the Center of the Earth:  "Since the beginning of time, all women have heard footsteps...up there." In any case, the wives are right: there is something out there, and it is them (Us).

There are zombie-like creatures in the film, and lots of scissors and jump suits. The jump suits (and the ending) remind me of The Brood. There are similarities to The Shining  and Jekyll and Hyde. The knowing way the mother looks at her son (named Jason, yet, who often wears a demonic mask) in the car at the very end is like every end of every 70s/early 80s horror film. It also reminded me of the growth on the little girl's neck at the end of The Brood. Something to stick on just when the movie could have ended so perfectly. (As Peter Shaffer said, "You need to give your audience release." We don't really get that at the end of Us.)

But I liked Us. It does have some original elements. The acting is excellent. There are some clever bits, like linking the theme to the hands across America movement of 1986. (The Washington Post once called the "Hands Across America" thing "The most 80s thing to happen in the 80s.") The alternate world theme is interestingly depicted, all those people who are basically shadows of the people who live above, in the sunshine. And I suppose there are some points to be made about good and evil; and middle-class American society in general. 

And then there are the rabbits. I couldn't help thinking of the credits of a non-horror movie: Woody Allen's Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex.

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex credits: "There's something wild about you child that's so contagious. Let's be outrageous -- let's misbehave!"

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One of the many rabbit scenes in Us

And there is an important, recurrent reference to the Bible, specifically Jeremiah 11:11:

"Therefore, thus says the Lord, Behold, I am bringing evil upon them which they cannot escape; though they cry to me, I will not listen to them."

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Us

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Hands Across America

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Dark Mansions (1986)  -  5/10

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Glossy failed-pilot TV-movie about a writer (Linda Purl) tasked with writing the biography of the powerful Drake family. Things get complicated when the writer is told she resembles a female member of the family who died under mysterious circumstances. Featuring Joan Fontaine, Dan O'Herlihy, Michael York, Nicollette Sheridan, Steve Inwood, Paul Shenar, Melissa Sue Anderson, Lois Chiles, Grant Alexsander, and Raymond St. Jacques. This was obviously modeled on Dark Shadows, but unfortunately the earliest period of the show, without the vampires, werewolves, and ghosts. Seeing as this was a pilot, it's possible that it may have gotten around to such things if it had made it to series, but alas... As it is, it remains a curio of slick 80's night-time soaps, with a few notables among the cast. It left me rather bored.

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The Untouchables - Season One (1959-1960)

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Period-piece crime drama, with 28 one-hour episodes, plus a pilot movie. Robert Stack stars as Eliot Ness, a dogged FBI agent tasked with fighting mobsters in Prohibition-era Chicago. He has a small group of agents to help, played by Abel Fernandez, Nicholas Georgiade, Steve London, Jerry Paris, and Anthony George. The highly-fictionalized show featured Ness and his men battling such infamous figures as Al Capone (Neville Brand), Ma Barker (Claire Trevor), Dutch Schultz (Lawrence Dobkin), "Mad Dog" Coll (Clu Gulager), and Frank Nitti (Bruce Gordon). Noteworthy guest stars included Keenan Wynn, Nehemiah Persoff (twice), Jack Warden (twice), Joe Mantell (three times), Louise Fletcher, Charles McGraw, Jack Lord, Lloyd Nolan, Cameron Mitchell, Dick Miller, Vince Edwards, Martin Landau, Jack Weston, Mike Mazurki, William Bendix, Alan Hale Jr., Gavin MacLeod, Marion Ross, Jay C. Flippen, Cliff Robertson, Whit Bissell, Jack Elam, Henry Silva, J. Carrol Naish, Marc Lawrence, Jim Backus, Harry Guardino, John Marley, Dan O'Herlihy, Claude Akins, Lee Van Cleef, Dick York, Nita Talbot, Betty Field, Jeremy Slate, Leslie Nielsen, Anne Francis, Peter Falk, Thomas Mitchell, Richard Anderson, Dick Foran, Majel Barrett, Timothy Carey, and Harry Dean Stanton.

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The show features excellent production values, even if some of the hairstyles cause one to forget that they're supposed to be watching something set in the 1930's. The show is very cinematic, and was directed by the likes of Phil Karlson, Tay Garnett, Robert Florey, and Stuart Rosenberg. The show's pilot was actually a two-part episode of the Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, and it dealt with the takedown of Al Capone. It was later re-edited and released as a feature film, The Scarface Mob, in 1962, and it accounts for why it isn't often shown in syndication with the rest of the series. Another two-part episode from Season One, "The Unhired Assassin", was also released later as a film, The Gun of Zangara.

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While the show plays very fast and loose with the facts, it's very entertaining. It's also very violent, with old women machine-gunned in the back, people burned alive, men women & children run over by cars, stranglings, stabbings, etc. It's easy to see why there was some debate about the show's gruesome content at the time. The show was also criticized for a perceived denigration of Italian-Americans, even as early as the show's Desilu pilot, which is why Agent Enrico Rossi (Georgiade) was added to the team in the first regular episode. However, I had to laugh at how he joins the good guys: he's a mob-hating barber who hacks up a gangster's face with a straight razor, after which Ness immediately drafts him in as an agent!

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The Mule (2018)  -  5/10

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Clunky crime drama directed by and starring Clint Eastwood. He plays a Korean War vet and horticulturist whose business is nearly as tattered as his family life. When he gets the unusual offer to transport drugs across the U.S./Mexican border for a powerful drug cartel, he agrees, and soon finds himself becoming a favorite "mule" due to his inconspicuous nature. Meanwhile, DEA agent Bradley Cooper, newly assigned to the Southwest region, begins to hone in on stories of a new, mysterious link in the drug chain. Also featuring Dianne Wiest, Laurence Fishburne, Alison Eastwood, Michael Pena, Taissa Farmiga, Victor Rasuk, Clifton Collins Jr., Loren Dean, Richard Herd, and Andy Garcia. There are moments to like in this based-on-a-true-story tale, but just as much of it is silly or outright stupid, with sloppy performances, a lazy script, and Eastwood's typical late-period flat direction. 

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I-Man (1986)  -  5/10

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Failed TV-pilot movie featuring Scott Bakula (in his debut) as a Houston-area cab driver and single dad who gets exposed to gases from another planet. He gains apparent indestructibility (thus the "I" in the title), able to heal all wounds almost instantly, as well as being tireless. He's recruited by government man Herschel Bernardi to try and stop mad billionaire John Anderson from using experimental laser weapons to destroy San Francisco. Also featuring Ellen Bry as Bakula's special agent partner, Joey Cramer as his son who was also exposed to the alien gas, big John Bloom, Dale Wilson, Ian Tracey, and Cindy Higgins. This is goofy, modeled on Greatest American Hero with its clumsy, reluctant hero, and the concept isn't exploited to its fullest, either. This was aired as an episode of The Magical World of Disney. Bakula would play another reluctant superhero in yet another failed pilot in the following year's Infiltrator.

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Beyond the Rising Moon (1987)  -  5/10

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Very ambitious, very low budget science fiction. Pentan (Tracy Davis) is a genetically-modified, lab-grown assassin working for one of the mega-corporations that rule the known galaxy a hundred years from now. When an alien artifact is discovered on a distant world, she goes rogue to try and secure it for her own and try to win her freedom. Also featuring a bunch of people you've never heard of. This film was made on a shoestring independently by people who seem to have really cared about it. Visually it lifts a lot of its style from Blade Runner and Dune, while the script borrows heavily from the works of William Gibson and Frederik Pohl. The extensive miniature work is both laudable and laughable, and it has a certain charm. It's a shame that the pacing and the performances couldn't have been better, though. Apparently this was re-released in the mid-00's under the title Outerworld with extensive editing and effects work being replaced with CGI, to the film's detriment. That's only what I've read though, as I haven't seen that newer version, nor am I inclined to.

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I had a really interesting double feature last night/this morning.

first, I saw THE PAINTED VEIL (MGM 1934), which I have been wanting to see for a long time. GARBO, billed from top-to-bottom of the screen, costars with HERBERT MARSHALL and a still-svelte GEORGE BRENT as an Austrian woman who marries an English doctor, cheats with BRENT (verrrrry popular choice in 1930's films) and ends up in the middle of a cholera-stricken province in China.

It's not a film for everyone, but I really liked it. GARBO is allowed to really act for about 15 minutes in the film, and she is given luxurious, lingering close-ups. She and MARSHALL have a particularly moving scene in the kitchen of their hut in the last third of the movie (HERBERT seems to have been one to WITHOUT FAIL bring out the best in his leading ladies.) In other scenes, THE EYES tell us EVERYTHING. But for most of the film, she is giving us THE GARBO PERSONA, probably because MAYER was calling the shots and demanded it, but as I have said before- watching GARBO play GARBO is still worth it.

She seems to have found an excellent hairdresser in the middle of Cholera-plagued, rural China;  also wears this in one scene, which yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaassssss:

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my favorite scene had to be when she is working as a nurse with a bunch of nuns in a children's hospital/convent in the middle of dire unrest, riots, and a major epidemic ravaging the province  and she's wearing an all-white sort of nun's habit/old fashioned nurse's snood sort of thing and we see her from behind at first, and she turns around and her face has been BEAT by Max Factor- she is wearing foundation, contour, a heavy brow, eyeliner and baby false eyelashes.

"the seesters are so kind to me, they let me wear my false eyelashes even though they frighten the cheeldren."

I LOVE HERBERT MARSHALL; he seems to have cornered the market on SOMERSET MAUGHAM adaptations, and I'm fine with this. Seeing him in this made me love him just a tiny bit more as an actor, which i wasn't sure was possible and also managed to make his performances in both versions of THE LETTER all the more nuanced and outstanding.

file under: THEY DON'T MAKE 'EM LIKE THIS ANYMORE AND, FRANKLY, IT'S A GD SHAME.

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and then I watched THE BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN (1925) on TCM ON HULU (guess it was the SILENT SUNDAY feature?)

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I had always thought this was, like, ABEL GANCE-style length and was surprised by how short it was (an hour and 18 minutes)

I was also- and I apologize if it's tacky to mention this, but here goes- quite surprised by how, um, titillating the first scenes are...the Russian actors in the roles of the sailors are, um, in some cases smoking hot. I REALLY, really do NOT think that's what EISENSTEIN AND CO. were going for (although the lingering quality of some of the shots of bare backs and shirtless men are, like, FASSBENDER-level erotic.)

I think the best scene in the movie is the mutiny though, which is almost like a ballet the way it's staged and it is enthralling to watch.

Overall, I get that this film IS A MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT, and it is stunningly well put together- the editing, the composition of the shots, THE MUSIC- and yet- the ending left me a little cold and there is a decided lag at the exact halfway mark (I know this because I paused it, by chance, right at the exact middle of the film when my patience wore thin.)

I took it back up this morning (the beauty of modern living) and I have to say, while I get that this film is a legitimate masterpiece- something about it left me a little cold.

after, of course, it made me hot.

(I'd like to think there is some alternate universe where SERGEI EISENSTEIN'S 'QUERELLE' is a thing that exists.)

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I had a really interesting double feature last night/this morning.

first, I saw THE PAINTED VEIL (MGM 1934), which I have been wanting to see for a long time. GARBO, billed from top-to-bottom of the screen, costars with HERBERT MARSHALL and a still-svelte GEORGE BRENT as an Austrian woman who marries an English doctor, cheats with BRENT (verrrrry popular choice in 1930's films) and ends up in the middle of a cholera-stricken province in China.

It's not a film for everyone, but I really liked it. GARBO is allowed to really act for about 15 minutes in the film, and she is given luxurious, lingering close-ups. She and MARSHALL have a particularly moving scene in the kitchen of their hut in the last third of the movie (HERBERT seems to have been one to WITHOUT FAIL bring out the best in his leading ladies.) In other scenes, THE EYES tell us EVERYTHING. But for most of the film, she is giving us THE GARBO PERSONA, probably because MAYER was calling the shots and demanded it, but as I have said before- watching GARBO play GARBO is still worth it.

She seems to have found an excellent hairdresser in the middle of Cholera-plagued, rural China;  also wears this in one scene, which yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaassssss:

a3473413a11bf292fc86fdf6ab1e980d.jpg

my favorite scene had to be when she is working as a nurse with a bunch of nuns in a children's hospital/convent in the middle of dire unrest, riots, and a major epidemic ravaging the province  and she's wearing an all-white sort of nun's habit/old fashioned nurse's snood sort of thing and we see her from behind at first, and she turns around and her face has been BEAT by Max Factor- she is wearing foundation, contour, a heavy brow, eyeliner and baby false eyelashes.

"the seesters are so kind to me, they let me wear my false eyelashes even though they frighten the cheeldren."

I LOVE HERBERT MARSHALL; he seems to have cornered the market on SOMERSET MAUGHAM adaptations, and I'm fine with this. Seeing him in this made me love him just a tiny bit more as an actor, which i wasn't sure was possible and also managed to make his performances in both versions of THE LETTER all the more nuanced and outstanding.

file under: THEY DON'T MAKE 'EM LIKE THIS ANYMORE AND, FRANKLY, IT'S A GD SHAME.

I wasn't able to watch this go round, but this film has always been a guilty pleasure. Love Garbo's outfits in this. And no one played cuckold's better than Marshall! LOL. If I remember correctly, this was Garbo's last non-period piece until Ninotchka and was not a success. Seem to remember this was remade a decade or so ago. Forget who was in it.

Brentie and Garbo were a hot item off screen too, for awhile....

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18 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I wasn't able to watch this go round, but this film has always been a guilty pleasure. Love Garbo's outfits in this. And no one played cuckold's better than Marshall! LOL. If I remember correctly, this was Garbo's last non-period piece until Ninotchka and was not a success. Seem to remember this was remade a decade or so ago. Forget who was in it.

Brentie and Garbo were a hot item off screen too, for awhile....

Yes, it was remade not too long ago...with Naomi Watts?

according to Wikipedia THE PAINTED VEIL was a smash and made A MILLION Six hundred thousand DOLLARS!

ig money back then

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ABOUT A BOY (2002) *Score: 5/10*

Starring: Hugh Grant, Toni Collette, Nicholas Hoult, Rachel Weisz. 

Grant plays Will, a Londoner who has no job, and does essentially nothing of importance every day, due to the fact that he has an inheritance to fall back on. He meets a young boy named Marcus (Hoult), who wants Will to spend time with his mentally ill mother (Collette), in an attempt to make her happy again. The movie follows Will's and Marcus' relationship, and the struggles both of them face in their lives: Will is trying to be more honest and interesting, and Marcus is trying to make friends at school. 

This was okay, I guess. I thought Nicholas Hoult did a great job in this, as did Toni Collette (but that's no surprise, because she's good in everything I've seen her in). 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Yes, it was remade not too long ago...with Naomi Watts?

according to Wikipedia THE PAINTED VEIL was a smash and made A MILLION Six hundred thousand DOLLARS!

ig money back then

That's not what I remember reading! Maybe a worldwide smash, but not in the U.S. (her films made more money in Europe) anyway, not a big deal.

Maybe what I read was that it was considered a box office disappointment considering it's cost. It's U.S. gross isnt that much more than it's budget.

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