speedracer5

I Just Watched...

18,833 posts in this topic

13 hours ago, TomJH said:

I agree, Lawrence. A dreary film in which it's difficult to care about any of the characters. (snipped)Willis, as always these days, shows up to cash his pay check without giving an attempt at a performance. He used to be an actor.

220px-Glass_(2019_poster).png

Just one look at the angry, dreary faces featured on that poster tells me this movie will be a total bore. Who wants to sit through 2 hours of violence, revenge fueled by self pitying anger?

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On 4/28/2019 at 8:01 PM, kingrat said:

One of the pleasures at the recent TCM Festival was seeing Broadway Danny Rose with a movie buddy from Florida.

Broadway Danny Rose is one of the lovely, slightly quirky little films of Woody's career that I enjoy more than most. I completely agree with you, kingrat, about the skill of Mia Farrow's performance  as an unexpectedly hard boiled character. That moment towards end in which she shows up at Woody's apartment door and asks him if he can forgive her (for her earlier betrayal of him) is wonderfully understated. No cheap dramatics here. It feels genuine and emotionally honest. This is a little moment that can get a tear rolling down my cheek.

And I love the idea of that little party at Danny Rose's home at which it takes place. There they are, Danny's group of clients (and friends) gathered together. Individually you know they must lead lives of lonely frustration, as none of them exactly fit in with the "norms" of society, but Danny has them all gather at his home. Here they have companionship from those cold streets outside. Here, at this moment, they all have a sense of companionship and family. I find this scene touching in its quirky sweetness.

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On 4/26/2019 at 3:14 PM, LawrenceA said:

Something Wild (1961)  -  6/10

220px-Something_Wild.jpg

Independent drama starring Carroll Baker as a college student who is sexually assaulted on her way home through a park. She decides not to tell anyone, and emotionally retreats from her family. She quits school, gets a job, and rents a fleabag apartment. When things continue to deteriorate for her mentally, an auto mechanic (Ralph Meeker) decides to "save" her in an unconventional manner. Also featuring Mildred Dunnock, Clifton James, Martin Kosleck, Jean Stapleton, and Doris Roberts. I liked the NYC locations and the dingy, decayed cinematography, which matched Baker's character's state of mind. I was really enjoying this on the whole, as a boundary-pushing psychological drama on a then-taboo subject, but it all goes downhill in the second act when Meeker's character shows up and things just get ridiculous.

Source: TCM

I found it unnerving Jean Stapleton playing a prostitute in this. EDITH???

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6 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I found it unnerving Jean Stapleton playing a prostitute in this. EDITH???

archie-bunker-carroll-o-connor.jpg?w=640

"The Dingbat? Oh, don't gimme that."

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16 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Starship Invasions (1977)  -  3/10 or 8/10

220px-Starship_Invasions1977.jpg

Incredibly goofy Canadian sci-fi epic, with Robert Vaughn as a bored-looking UFO expert, and Christopher Lee as an evil alien named Ramses. This one has to be seen to be believed. I tip my hat to ye, o' northern brethren. 

Both are available on YouTube.

Just look at some of this stuff:

Christopher Lee, in black tights featuring a terrible picture of...what is that, a dragon?...flanked by a space hooker (no, really) and a potato-head alien.

MV5BMmI0Yzk5NmEtOTNlMS00YzJhLThmMzktYmZl

Christopher Lee brandishes his finger pistols.

starship-invasions-5.jpg

A high-tech robot.

uozzqwk60352.gif

An abducted farmer is subjected to...experiments.

starshipinvasions2.jpg

At one point Christoper Lee asks,"Have all of the necessary fluids been extracted from the female?" That's the sort of thing you only hear in the finest of cinema.

starshipinvasions3.jpg

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52 minutes ago, TomJH said:

archie-bunker-carroll-o-connor.jpg?w=640

"The Dingbat? Oh, don't gimme that."

LOL!!!

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35 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Just look at some of this stuff:

Christopher Lee, in black tights featuring a terrible picture of...what it that, a dragon?...flanked by a space hooker (no, really) and a potato-head alien.

MV5BMmI0Yzk5NmEtOTNlMS00YzJhLThmMzktYmZl

Christopher Lee brandishes his finger pistols.

starship-invasions-5.jpg

A high-tech robot.

uozzqwk60352.gif

An abducted farmer is subjected to...experiments.

starshipinvasions2.jpg

At one point Christoper Lee asks,"Have all of the necessary fluids been extracted from the female?" That's the sort of thing you only hear in the finest of cinema.

starshipinvasions3.jpg

You really know how to sell a film, Lawrence.

I see that it's from Hal Roach Studios. Are you sure it's not intended to be a comedy?

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

I see that it's from Hal Roach Studios. Are you sure it's not intended to be a comedy?

You know, I asked myself that same question about 20 minutes in, and some scenes and isolated moments seem played so broadly as to be intentionally comical. But then the majority of it is played very straight, and it goes to some dark places. I haven't even mentioned the plot point involving Lee's alien armada bombarding the Earth with rays that cause people to go on murder sprees before committing suicide.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

You know, I asked myself that same question about 20 minutes in, and some scenes and isolated moments seem played so broadly as to be intentionally comical. But then the majority of it is played very straight, and it goes to some dark places. I haven't even mentioned the plot point involving Lee's alien armada bombarding the Earth with rays that cause people to go on murder sprees before committing suicide.

Sounds as if "Plan 10 from Outer Space" might have been a better title for this thing then, eh Lawrence?!

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

You know, I asked myself that same question about 20 minutes in, and some scenes and isolated moments seem played so broadly as to be intentionally comical. But then the majority of it is played very straight, and it goes to some dark places. I haven't even mentioned the plot point involving Lee's alien armada bombarding the Earth with rays that cause people to go on murder sprees before committing suicide.

 

5 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Sounds as if "Plan 10 from Outer Space" might have been a better title for this thing then, eh Lawrence?!

ed-wood1.jpg

"If only it could have had my directorial genius."

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6 hours ago, Hibi said:

I found it unnerving Jean Stapleton playing a prostitute in this. EDITH???

...and probably a pretty cheap one at that. 

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Just now, cigarjoe said:

...and probably a pretty cheap one at that. 

YES, SHE WAS! LOL.

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"Tomorrow Is Forever" - 1946 - Irving Pichel -

starring Claudette Colbert, Orson Welles, George Brent, Lucille Watson, Richard Long, Natalie Wood -

one of the greatest of soap-operas -

it deliberately avoids the usual pitfalls -

it never becomes maudlin -

terrific performances from all of the actors -

the ending in which the truth is never actually spoken is extremely powerful -

less is more, to be sure -

tomorrow.jpg?w=660

 

 

 

 

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The Late Edwina Black (1951). It is known also as: The Obsessed (1951).

It is Geraldine Fitzgerald as companion to an ill, nasty and evil woman who is murdered. She and the woman's husband are in love and have been waiting for her to die. 

Jean Cadell is a sort of low-rent version of Mrs. Danvers.

One might think that Roland Culver as the Scotland Yard Inspector is channeling Columbo if it were not for the date of production.

This is a nice little murder mystery. I found a few scenes were more melodramatic than they needed to be and there is a bit of flouncing but it is over-all very well-acted.

The ending was within the framework of what I suspected but certain details were not available until the denouement. 

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Bog (1979)  -  2/10

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Dismal low-rent creature feature with an ancient monster rising from its slumber at the bottom of a Wisconsin lake in a quest to drink human blood. Featuring Gloria De Haven as the county coroner, Aldo Ray as the sheriff, Marshall Thompson as a doctor, and Leo Gordon. The monster looks like a giant bug-eyed fish man with lobster-claw hands. I've seen '78, '79. '83, and '84 all listed as release dates for this.

Bog-Pic-2.jpg

 

The Time Machine (1978)  -  3/10

TimeMachine.jpg

Dismal low-rent TV-movie take on the H.G. Wells tale. John Beck stars as the inventor who makes a time machine to go back and forward through time. The first half of the film, concerning Beck's battles with his government contractor employers wanting him to make an antimatter bomb rather than a time machine, and then his first sojourns back in time to first the Salem witch trials and then the wild west, are dull and dumb. The second half of the film, that deals with the far future and the familiar territory of the other adaptations, is only slightly better, with Priscilla Barnes as the beautiful Eloi girl Weena, and the cannibalistic Morlocks, who here sport bald fright masks. Also featuring Andrew Duggan, Rosemary DeCamp, R.G. Armstrong (who is dubbed by another actor for some reason), Jack Kruschen, John Doucette, George "Buck" Flower, and Whit Bissell.

hqdefault.jpg

 

Source: both from YouTube

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Mercy! I think I'll pass on this one, although John Beck is a fine-looking man with a great mustache.

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They Live By Night (1948) **POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD**

I recorded this Nicholas Ray movie a while back.  I always see this movie at Barnes and Noble during the Criterion sale and was always intrigued by the cover.  I just watched it last night.  I loved it! I always try to make a point of recording Ray's films if I see them scheduled.  I really enjoy his style of storytelling.  His films seem a little more realistic, a little less glamorous and romanticized.  This might be my favorite of Ray's films that I've seen so far. I think In a Lonely Place is probably my second favorite.  Rebel Without a Cause, Born to Be Bad, and On Dangerous Ground round out the top 5.

The title, "They Drive By Night," refers to Bowie and Keechie's lifestyle.  To move from place to place, they have to travel at night, because there are too many chances of them being seen during the daytime. In this film, Farley Granger plays Bowie, a young man who has escaped from prison.  Accompanying him are bank robbers, Chicamaw and T-Dub.  It seems that Bowie has spent the past seven years in prison for a murder he did not commit.  Chicamaw and T-Dub decide to knock over a local bank.  Bowie, wanting money to pay a lawyer to help exonerate him from the murder charge, agrees to participate in the heist.  Bowie cases out the bank and also serves as the getaway driver.

The heist goes off as planned.  The thieves switch vehicles.  Chicamaw purchases a new vehicle with some of his cut.  On the way back, Bowie and Chicamaw are speeding and showboating on the freeway, when Bowie ends up getting in a car accident. He ends up being taken back to a gas station where he meets Keechie, played by Cathy O'Donnell.  Keechie is the daughter of the gas station owner.  She is pretty, but plain.  I found Keechie's appearance very refreshing.  She isn't made up to be overly glam or provocative, like she may have been were this a Louis B. Mayer MGM production.  Her plain appearance works for the film.  She lives at (or near) a gas station in a small town. In some scenes, she looks very young--like if I'd heard that the actress was only 16, I would believe it.  In other scenes she looks a little older, like early to mid-20s. 

Anyway, Bowie finds something endearing about Keechie and is smitten with her.  While convalescing at her home, he expresses his wish to go out on the road and try to live a straight and narrow life.  However, he was an accomplice to a bank robbery and is still an escaped prisoner, so he has to stay hidden from view.  Keechie, feeling affection for Bowie as well, offers to go on the road with him--despite his being on the lam.  While on the road, the couple marry and hole up in a remote cabin.  Their life is going well except for when Chicamaw finds them and asks Bowie to assist in another job.

I liked the story of this couple just trying to be together, despite the circumstances.  I liked the dichotomy of Bowie, a thief, trying to live an honest and decent life while trying to protect his wife.  Keechie is completely innocent and accepted him, despite his having committed a felony.  Bowie, however, also willingly participates in something that he knows is wrong, only because he feels indebted to Chicamaw and T-Dub. Bowie and Keechie also run across Mattie, a woman whose husband was in jail with Chicamaw, T-Dub and Bowie.  She is upset that they're out free while her husband is still in prison. 

I absolutely loved this movie.  I liked the very romantic beginning of the film, it depicts Bowie and Keechie at the height of their happiness together.  I loved the very natural progression and depiction of the young lovers' relationship, set against the backdrop of being on the lam.  Here are Bowie and Keechie, two young 20-somethings, without much experience in relationships or even being on their own, setting off to start a life together.  The couple are depicted in a variety of different situations: awkward, romantic, angry, sad, etc. and both actors portray their emotions well.  I especially thought that Keechie was a very interesting character.  At the beginning of the film, she's depicted as a bit of a tomboy and standoffish.  Then she finds something in Bowie that makes her open up and feel genuine affection.  Bowie, who spent many of his formidable years in prison, experiences the same feelings as Keechie.

The ending of the film is a real bummer, but I figured with the production code, something like that would occur.  I wasn't sure if Keechie had lost her baby.  Typically in old films, when pregnant characters fall or are in some type of accident, they'll lose the baby.  This isn't expressly said in the film, but then Keechie's illness right afterward made me think something had happened.  However, the baby is still talked about after the fact.  I'm not sure if Keechie was sparing Bowie's the anguish, or perhaps the baby was fine.

I also figured that Bowie's buying the watch during his casing of the bank would screw him at some point, especially when the guy appeared in the window of his getaway vehicle and Bowie had to punch him to get him to go away, but it seems that the watches were a red herring. 

This was a great film. Highly recommended.

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AVENGERS: ENDGAME (2019) *Score: 8/10*

For brevity's sake (and so I don't meet the same fate as an aforementioned chap who uttered major spoilers), let's just say I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was a fantastic way to wrap up the Avengers franchise. I thought it was very well done. It's been such a long journey for everyone involved, and it's definitely a little bittersweet. 

Image result for avengers endgame

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On 4/30/2019 at 1:42 AM, LawrenceA said:

The Time Machine (1978)  -  3/10

TimeMachine.jpg

Dismal low-rent TV-movie take on the H.G. Wells tale.

One of a series of dismal low-rent "Classics Illustrated" TV-movies from Sunn Classic Pictures--anyone remember THAT name from the 70's?--as they were moving away from Mormon-based paranormal documentaries, and trying to get a network series.

I doubt I'd remember it for any other reason.  😛

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8 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

AVENGERS: ENDGAME (2019) *Score: 8/10*

It's been such a long journey for everyone involved, and it's definitely a little bittersweet. 

sheep.jpg?w=420&h=280

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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

They Live By Night (1948) **POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD**

(my replies are in blue- LHF)

SPEEDRACER:I recorded this Nicholas Ray movie a while back.This might be my favorite of Ray's films that I've seen so far. I think In a Lonely Place is probably my second favorite.  Rebel Without a Cause, Born to Be Bad, and On Dangerous Ground round out the top 5.

I would also recommend JOHNNY GUITAR, although it requires multiple viewings, and THE LUSTY MEN- which is more interesting every time I see it. A LOT of NIC RAY films DEMAND more than one viewing.

SR: The title, "They Drive By Night," refers to Bowie and Keechie's lifestyle. 

And it's the ONLY THING I DON'T LIKE about this movie, which- yes- is excellent.  You may know this, but it's based on a depression era novel named THIEVES LIKE US, which I read last year and reviewed in this thread. As much as I LOVE the movie, I think I maybe loved the novel A TINY BIT more (throughout the novel, the characters keep saying of the local police, authorities, governments, etc "why, they're just thieves like us" (and every time, THEY'RE RIGHT!)

HOWARD HUGHES, I believe, insisted on the title change which is STUPID. He also, if I recall correctly, held up the release of the film for some time.

SR:I liked the story of this couple just trying to be together, despite the circumstances.

Again, I REALLY think you'd LOVE the novel, where the romance element (unconstrained by the code) is even STRONGER. It's a GREAT love story. IT'S still in print, and can be bought in an edition with four other classic noir tales, among them THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE and NIGHTMARE ALLEY

51AGM8XMF5L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

 

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On 4/30/2019 at 11:13 PM, speedracer5 said:

They Live By Night (1948) **POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD**

I recorded this Nicholas Ray movie a while back.  I always see this movie at Barnes and Noble during the Criterion sale and was always intrigued by the cover.  I just watched it last night.  I loved it! I always try to make a point of recording Ray's films if I see them scheduled.  I really enjoy his style of storytelling.  His films seem a little more realistic, a little less glamorous and romanticized.  This might be my favorite of Ray's films that I've seen so far. I think In a Lonely Place is probably my second favorite.  Rebel Without a Cause, Born to Be Bad, and On Dangerous Ground round out the top 5.

The title, "They Drive By Night," refers to Bowie and Keechie's lifestyle.  To move from place to place, they have to travel at night, because there are too many chances of them being seen during the daytime. In this film, Farley Granger plays Bowie, a young man who has escaped from prison.  Accompanying him are bank robbers, Chicamaw and T-Dub.  It seems that Bowie has spent the past seven years in prison for a murder he did not commit.  Chicamaw and T-Dub decide to knock over a local bank.  Bowie, wanting money to pay a lawyer to help exonerate him from the murder charge, agrees to participate in the heist.  Bowie cases out the bank and also serves as the getaway driver.

The heist goes off as planned.  The thieves switch vehicles.  Chicamaw purchases a new vehicle with some of his cut.  On the way back, Bowie and Chicamaw are speeding and showboating on the freeway, when Bowie ends up getting in a car accident. He ends up being taken back to a gas station where he meets Keechie, played by Cathy O'Donnell.  Keechie is the daughter of the gas station owner.  She is pretty, but plain.  I found Keechie's appearance very refreshing.  She isn't made up to be overly glam or provocative, like she may have been were this a Louis B. Mayer MGM production.  Her plain appearance works for the film.  She lives at (or near) a gas station in a small town. In some scenes, she looks very young--like if I'd heard that the actress was only 16, I would believe it.  In other scenes she looks a little older, like early to mid-20s. 

Anyway, Bowie finds something endearing about Keechie and is smitten with her.  While convalescing at her home, he expresses his wish to go out on the road and try to live a straight and narrow life.  However, he was an accomplice to a bank robbery and is still an escaped prisoner, so he has to stay hidden from view.  Keechie, feeling affection for Bowie as well, offers to go on the road with him--despite his being on the lam.  While on the road, the couple marry and hole up in a remote cabin.  Their life is going well except for when Chicamaw finds them and asks Bowie to assist in another job.

I liked the story of this couple just trying to be together, despite the circumstances.  I liked the dichotomy of Bowie, a thief, trying to live an honest and decent life while trying to protect his wife.  Keechie is completely innocent and accepted him, despite his having committed a felony.  Bowie, however, also willingly participates in something that he knows is wrong, only because he feels indebted to Chicamaw and T-Dub. Bowie and Keechie also run across Mattie, a woman whose husband was in jail with Chicamaw, T-Dub and Bowie.  She is upset that they're out free while her husband is still in prison. 

I absolutely loved this movie.  I liked the very romantic beginning of the film, it depicts Bowie and Keechie at the height of their happiness together.  I loved the very natural progression and depiction of the young lovers' relationship, set against the backdrop of being on the lam.  Here are Bowie and Keechie, two young 20-somethings, without much experience in relationships or even being on their own, setting off to start a life together.  The couple are depicted in a variety of different situations: awkward, romantic, angry, sad, etc. and both actors portray their emotions well.  I especially thought that Keechie was a very interesting character.  At the beginning of the film, she's depicted as a bit of a tomboy and standoffish.  Then she finds something in Bowie that makes her open up and feel genuine affection.  Bowie, who spent many of his formidable years in prison, experiences the same feelings as Keechie.

The ending of the film is a real bummer, but I figured with the production code, something like that would occur.  I wasn't sure if Keechie had lost her baby.  Typically in old films, when pregnant characters fall or are in some type of accident, they'll lose the baby.  This isn't expressly said in the film, but then Keechie's illness right afterward made me think something had happened.  However, the baby is still talked about after the fact.  I'm not sure if Keechie was sparing Bowie's the anguish, or perhaps the baby was fine.

I also figured that Bowie's buying the watch during his casing of the bank would screw him at some point, especially when the guy appeared in the window of his getaway vehicle and Bowie had to punch him to get him to go away, but it seems that the watches were a red herring. 

This was a great film. Highly recommended.

They Lived by Night had, for many years, almost a legendary status for me. That is because it was so famous ( at least for me, a film noir and Nicholas Ray fan) and yet I had never seen it. For years, I never could see it. It just didn't seem to be available in Canada - not on tv, not in any format. I remember as far back as the early 90s I would ask at the then ubiquitous video stores if any of them had They Lived by Night, and none of them ever did, nor were they able to order it for me.

So you can imagine how delighted I was when it finally became available for me ! The first time I finally saw this elusive noir I'd been dying to see for literally decades (ok, two decades) was on TCM. And now I actually own it on DVD.

I just had to go into all that, the history of my quest to see They Live by Night because, like all things you want but cannot have, the more I looked for it and couldn't have it, the more I wanted to see it, and the greater the legendary status it had for me.

Anyway, nice write-up, speedy. I agree with everything you said about it, especially the sweet romantic aspect. I think one reason it is so sweet ("sweet" in a good way, sympathetic, touching - not as in "sickly sweet") is because of the two leads. Cathy O'Donnell has to be one of the most appealing actresses of her era. She has a lovely, rather innocent-looking face. She looks kind, and somehow vulnerable. I've always really liked her. That vulnerability and innocence is perfect for the character of Keechie.

And Farley Granger's Bowie is equally likable, and for the same reasons. This actor always has, to me, a soft quality to him - not in a bad way, I just mean, he's never a tough guy, he always seems like he's struggling somehow. 

Did you know these two were paired again in another noir, Side Street? The producers must have wanted to repeat the successful chemistry of O' Donnell and Granger everyone recognized in TLBN. It's not quite as dramatic or intense as the earlier Ray film, but it is a decent little noir. Directed by Anthony Mann ( a director I really like), it's got some great scenes, especially near the end. And the loving relationship so delicately depicted  between O'Donnell's Keechie and Granger's Bowie, is repeated, albeit not so tragically, in Side Street.

One of the strangest and saddest scenes in They Live by Night is Keechie and Bowie's marriage ceremony. They decide to get married quite spontaneously, and the only place they can find, given the short notice and also of course the fact that they're on the run, is a seedy cheap all-night wedding service in some crummy tourist town. There's something both deeply moving and kind of awful about this marriage ceremony scene - you feel these two misunderstood lovers deserve better, but they have no choice.

Another bittersweet scene is one near the film's end. It's Christmas time, and the couple have attempted to decorate their little motel room in the spirit of the season. Then they have a fight, the only one they have in the entire story. Somehow the sad little Christmas decorations make this scene all the more moving.

This Nicholas Ray film is generally regarded as a noir. I wonder if Eddie will ever air it on Noir Alley? I'd love to hear his comments about it.

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

sheep.jpg?w=420&h=280

Would I be correct in assuming you are calling me a sheep, Tiki?

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Miss W., I'm pretty sure Eddie has already shown They Live By Night on Noir Alley.......

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