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I Just Watched...

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Attack of the Beast Creatures (1985)  -  4/10

I love when puppets attack.

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Death Wish (2018)

Entertaining update of the 1974 vigilante classic, this time with Bruce Willis as a surgeon driven to committing violence on street bad guys after his wife is murdered and daughter placed in a coma following a home invasion by three goons.

The film, skillfuly crafted, can be seen as more male fantasy about blowing the heads off bad guys with tattoos and lousy teeth in the mean streets than it is a right wing cry for vigilantism, especially since crime in the big cities today has declined over what it was in the '70s. For that reason, and to make the protagonist more credible in his mission, the new version is set in Chicago, one of the American metropolises today where the crime and murder rate is well publicized as out of control.

Unlike Charles Bronson in the original, the Willis character knows nothing about guns (he even injures himself in his first street action because of his poor weapon skills). Since he is played by Willis, who has a history of action films, the audience may be more inclined to accept him soon turning into a virtual executioner on the streets than they would be if another actor had played such a gun innocent-turned-crime fighter.

Soon the media in the film has his character dubbed The Grim Reaper because of the hoodie he wears, as talk radio is divided over whether his character is a menace on the streets or performing a service for the community. There is violence in the film but, with the exception of one prolonged sequence in which Willis tortures a low life creep (whom the audience had previously seen perform a heinous crime) for information before killing him, I did not find it too excessive.

As a matter of fact the scene in which Willis's wife and daughter are abused and murdered is surprisingly less graphic than in the 1974 original. I was grateful for that.

Willis's character is seeing a psychiatrist following the murder of his wife, and there is perverse humour in a scene in which the psychiatrist, for the first time seeing a more relaxed Willis (after he has killed a few street creeps) tells him that he is doing something right and, whatever it is, to keep on doing it. Willis says that he will, with a smile on his face.

The acting in the new Death Wish is very good. Bruce Willis is understated and effective as the decent family man turned vigilante. It's nice to see the actor emotionally investing himself in a character to a degree after a series of films in which he just walked through the proceedings with deadpan indifference.

The actor has fine support from Elizabeth Shue, brief as her role is, as his wife, Camila Morrone as his daughter and, in particular, Vincent D'onofrio in a thoughtful, sensitive performance as the doctor's supportive brother. I also enjoyed the performance of Dean Norris. He places a very human face on the role of the investigating detective on the Grim Reaper case, as well as bringing a bit of welcomed mild humour to a couple of scenes, as well.

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3 out of 4

 

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9 hours ago, EricJ said:

Again, don't blame Disney for this--They let Marvel do its own thing, and Kevin Feige (president of both Marvel Studios and the print-comic line) know their business, like they had for fifty years:  If you've ever read a comic book in your life as a kid, that's EXACTLY what comic books are in the business to do--String you along so you'll pay a quarter for next month's magazine.  "Next issue: 'If Doomsday Should Come'--The final battle with Doctor Doom!...Hang on till next month, true believers!  Excelsior!"

It wasn't until the "Franchise mentality" of the 00's that a movie could actually get away with recreating the one spiritual mark of a comic-book story.  George Lucas dreamed of a "Serial arc saga" back in the 70's and never lived to create it, and Harry Potter--which had already done it in a book series--had the reader base and the saga strategy to create 7 8 stories, and unite them all into one story arc.  Marvel, OTOH, was used to writing two dozen magazines every month where half their characters all lived in NYC and ran into each other, and with a big enough battle, if the Avengers was fighting a bad guy in Times Square, Spiderman might have a bit of city fallout to deal with in his comic, or show up in their magazine to nag if he could help.  (Which was basically the case, in "Spiderman: Homecoming").  Marvel's print magazines coined the term "Superhero universe", to suggest that there was some real alternate NYC where ALL of this was going on right now and we were only getting bulletins from it, and it was Hollywood that later abused the U-word.

The "hype" over Endgame is exactly, no more, no less (well, maybe more, with 12 films rather than seven, not counting a few clinkers) than Harry Potter generated for "Deathly Hallows, Pt. 2", and that was easily more fans' doing than Warner's:  They'd invested seven to ten years of their life--many were now in college who'd started in fourth grade--and wanted to see that the box was tied up for posterity with a red ribbon, and that they didn't drop the ball at the last minute like, ahem, a few OTHER franchises had (ahempiratesmatrix).   In fact, I've gotten big arguments from fans over "Shut up!--Infinity War was not 'like Deathly Hallows Pt. 1'!" "Uh, hello...They rambled around arguing and looking for objects, and then the villain found his weapon and won?"

In fact, I suspect the whole idea of "Murder She Wrote" was greenlit a suspiciously short time after Lansbury played Miss Marple (badly) in The Mirror Crack'd (1980), but that you didn't have to pay Agatha's estate for an original character.

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Angela wasn't the first (or even second) choice for the part of J.B. Fletcher. And I don't think she played Marple badly.

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The Chapman Report (1962)  -  5/10

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Lurid, boundary-pushing drama, directed by George Cukor, about a prominent scientist (Andrew Duggan) and his much-publicized sex survey of suburban woman. His chief surveyor (Efrem Zimbalist Jr.) encounters various women with various hang-ups and issues, including a housewife (Shelley Winters) having an affair; a doting daughter (Jane Fonda) who is maybe too close to her father; a happily-married woman (Glynis Johns) who begins to lust after a volleyball-playing hunk (Ty Hardin); and a disturbed nymphomaniac (Claire Bloom) on the path to self-destruction. Also featuring Ray Danton, John Dehner, Harold J. Stone, Henry Daniell, Chad Everett, Corey Allen, Jennifer Howard, Roy Roberts, Alex Cord, Norman Grabowski, Lesley Ann Warren, and Cloris Leachman. The tone of this is all over the place, with some sections played for meldrama (the Winters and Fonda bits), some for laughs (the Johns section), and one as psychological horror (Bloom). It's stridently titillating, and comes across as the cinematic equivalent of an adolescent just learning what all their parts are for. 

Source: TCM 

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Watched The Breaking Point on MOVIES-TV last night.

This film with John Garfield,  Patricia Neal,  Phyllis Thaxter,  Juan Hernandez  and Wallace Ford is a solid noir and has one of the most sadest ending in film history.

Directed by Michael Curtiz,  the film represents the Warner Studio system well.  

(some view the film as a remake of the Hawks\Bogie\Bacall film To Have and Have Not;  while there are similarities The Breaking Point is more faithful to the Hemingway short story,  more gritty and dark and not related to WWII, Germans etc...).

 

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The Condemned of Altona (1962)  -  7/10

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Italian adaptation of the Jean-Paul Sartre play, from director Vittorio De Sica. German shipping magnate Fredric March learns that he has six months left to live. He summons his son Robert Wagner and daughter-in-law Sophia Loren to his palatial estate in order to set plans for his passing. Loren, who resents Germany's Nazi past and March's role in it, learns that March's older son (Maximilian Schell), believed long dead, has lived in seclusion since the end of the war, so she sets out to learn why he is hidden away. Also with Francoise Prevost and Gabriele Tinti. This must have been a major European release at the time, as De Sica was one of the most respected directors, and Loren and Schell had just won the lead acting Oscars. It's heavy stuff, with the examination of German culpability for Nazi atrocities a thorny subject. The version I watched was in Italian with subtitles, so it was odd seeing March, Schell and Wagner dubbed with others' voices. 

Source: internet

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The Night Angel (1931)  -  5/10

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Creaky drama set in Prague with Fredric March as the new prosecutor in town, determined to clean the city up. He targets a shady bar and "entertainment establishment" run by Alison Skipworth and Alan Hale, but things get complicated when March falls for Skipworth's teenage daughter (Nancy Carroll). Also featuring Phoebe Foster, and Cora Witherspoon. Director Edmund Goudling does little to energize a muddled script. Skipworth is fun as the crooked "Countess", though.

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Source: internet

This was the last Fredric March movie that I had not seen that was also available to me. His first film, 1929's The Dummy, is said to have a print in the UCLA archives, but that's out of my reach. Two more early films, Jealousy and Footlights and Fools (both 1929), are believed lost. I've now seen his 67 other films.

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5 hours ago, Hibi said:

Angela wasn't the first (or even second) choice for the part of J.B. Fletcher. And I don't think she played Marple badly.

She basically sits out all of the story with a bad ankle and lets Edward Fox do the investigation, interprets all the findings for him, and then never gives any reason for her rationalizations.  The bewildered reactions from some of the characters to Lansbury's cheery deductions look oddly like they think Grandma's gone dotty again.

Compare that to Geraldine McEwan, as Christie's calculating gossip-hungry old knitter in the Granada TV versions, who knew how to ruthlessly grill witnesses for clues with old-lady-on-holiday small talk.

(That said, "Mirror"'s still one of the good "official" post-Orient Express Agatha Christie movies between the two Peter Ustinov Poirots, just for Elizabeth Taylor, the vintage-star cast, and enough old-star catty-kitsch to last Lorna a lifetime.)  😛

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Chapman Report (1962)  -  5/10

220px-The_Chapman_Report.jpg

Lurid, boundary-pushing drama, directed by George Cukor, about a prominent scientist (Andrew Duggan) and his much-publicized sex survey of suburban woman. His chief surveyor (Efrem Zimbalist Jr.) encounters various women with various hang-ups and issues, including a housewife (Shelley Winters) having an affair; a doting daughter (Jane Fonda) who is maybe too close to her father; a happily-married woman (Glynis Johns) who begins to lust after a volleyball-playing hunk (Ty Hardin); and a disturbed nymphomaniac (Claire Bloom) on the path to self-destruction. Also featuring Ray Danton, John Dehner, Harold J. Stone, Henry Daniell, Chad Everett, Corey Allen, Jennifer Howard, Roy Roberts, Alex Cord, Norman Grabowski, Lesley Ann Warren, and Cloris Leachman. The tone of this is all over the place, with some sections played for meldrama (the Winters and Fonda bits), some for laughs (the Johns section), and one as psychological horror (Bloom). It's stridently titillating, and comes across as the cinematic equivalent of an adolescent just learning what all their parts are for. 

Source: TCM 

By now, its' heaving luridnedss must be legendary.

Somebody, was it Cukor?, was having a good time.

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Chapman Report (1962)  -  5/10

220px-The_Chapman_Report.jpg

Lurid, boundary-pushing drama, directed by George Cukor, about a prominent scientist (Andrew Duggan) and his much-publicized sex survey of suburban woman. His chief surveyor (Efrem Zimbalist Jr.) encounters various women with various hang-ups and issues, including a housewife (Shelley Winters) having an affair; a doting daughter (Jane Fonda) who is maybe too close to her father; a happily-married woman (Glynis Johns) who begins to lust after a volleyball-playing hunk (Ty Hardin); and a disturbed nymphomaniac (Claire Bloom) on the path to self-destruction. Also featuring Ray Danton, John Dehner, Harold J. Stone, Henry Daniell, Chad Everett, Corey Allen, Jennifer Howard, Roy Roberts, Alex Cord, Norman Grabowski, Lesley Ann Warren, and Cloris Leachman. The tone of this is all over the place, with some sections played for meldrama (the Winters and Fonda bits), some for laughs (the Johns section), and one as psychological horror (Bloom). It's stridently titillating, and comes across as the cinematic equivalent of an adolescent just learning what all their parts are for. 

Source: TCM 

Yes, this is spectacularly bad. If there is a worse Cukor film, the title doesn't spring to mind. Claire Bloom actually manages to give a good serious performance in a stinky campy film. Though Jane Fonda is certainly good-looking, in none of the films she was making about this time does she give much evidence that she will become a talented dramatic actress. The most interesting thing about the film is that Efrem Zimbalist Jr. gets top billing. His career was hot at the time because of 77 Sunset Strip, but he wasn't able to turn that into a movie career as a leading man. I suppose his best movie performance is in support of Jean Simmons in Home Before Dark (1958).

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The Counterfeit Traitor (1962)  -  7/10

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WWII espionage story with William Holden as an American-raised Swedish oil CEO who has been selling crude to the Nazis. He's blacklisted by the Allies as a collaborator, so he agrees to become an agent for them to clear his reputation. He must pretend to go "all in" with the Nazis in order to learn their war strategies. Also starring Lilli Palmer as a fellow agent, Hugh Griffith, Eva Dahlbeck, Wolfgang Preiss, Carl Raddatz, Ernst Schroeder, Charles Regnier, Ingrid van Bergen, and Klaus Kinski. The international location shooting greatly enhances this taut thriller. The multi-national cast is introduced in the opening credits grouped by nationality, which is something I don't think I've seen before. Ingmar Bergman regular Eva Dahlbeck is wasted as Holden's wife, and she disappears quickly from the story, leading me to believe that her role was probably larger before editing. The 140-minute film is a bit sluggish to get started, but by the last quarter it's very engaging.

Source: internet

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Death Game (1977) by Peter S. Traynor.  Low budget home invasion film where two kooky girls played by Sondra Locke and Colleen Camp seduce Seymour Cassel then quickly ramp things up by threatening his life.  I thought I was being astute when noting that Cassel was completely revoiced by another actor (not bad dubbing btw) but someone had already mentioned this in the imdb trivia notes.  The closing credits have Bill Paxton and Sissy Spacek as set dressers.  Spacek also worked as a dresser on Phantom of the Paradise three years earlier.  Perhaps there were other films that haven't been listed on the imdb?

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3 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

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Death Game (1977) by Peter S. Traynor.  Low budget home invasion film where two kooky girls played by Sondra Locke and Colleen Camp seduce Seymour Cassel then quickly ramp things up by threatening his life.  I thought I was being astute when noting that Cassel was completely revoiced by another actor (not bad dubbing btw) but someone had already mentioned this in the imdb trivia notes.  The closing credits have Bill Paxton and Sissy Spacek as set dressers.  Spacek also worked as a dresser on Phantom of the Paradise three years earlier.  Perhaps there were other films that haven't been listed not he imdb?

Spacek worked on several films with her husband Jack Fisk, a noted art director and production designer. I also knew Bill Paxton started out as a set decorator, which is where he first met frequent collaborator James Cameron, who started out as a set designer and miniature effects artist. They both worked on Galaxy of Terror (1981). Oddly enough, both Spacek and Paxton originally hoped to become musical artists, but films worked out better for them.

I enjoyed Death Game for the most part. Stay away from the Eli Roth-directed remake Knock Knock (2015) which features one of the decade's worst performances courtesy of Keanu Reeves.

 

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SUSPIRIA (1977) *Score: 4/10*

I went into this one completely blind; I had no idea what the premise of this film was, but I wasn't shocked (surprisingly). I was mainly shocked by some of the online reviews I read while (and after) watching this... Everyone was raving about this movie for reasons I am still unaware of. 

Jessica Harper plays a young American woman who gets a place at this exclusive German ballet school. She arrives on a stormy night (how convenient), and she sees a young woman yelling something at someone, and running away. Under these mysterious circumstances, she decides to continue attending the school, all while other murders are happening at the school. I found Jessica Harper's "acting" very wooden. I preferred her in "Pennies from Heaven" (1981). She seemed much more natural in that one. I did like the director's fetish for primary colors, though. 

I honestly can't believe I sat through this entire thing. I'm trying not to be a quitter, I guess. 

Image result for suspiria 1977

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I love Suspiria (1977). One of my favorite horror films. I hated the recent remake, though.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I love Suspiria (1977). One of my favorite horror films. I hated the recent remake, though.

That's perfectly valid. I heard the original is better in this case. I guess it just wasn't my cup of tea. Maybe I was expecting something completely different? I don't know. Maybe I'll have better success with my next venture: Bonnie and Clyde (1967)... (seeing for the first time). 

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Escape from Zahrain (1962)  -  6/10

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In the fictional Middle Eastern country of Zahrain, a group of prisoners, including rebel leader Yul Brynner, escape from captivity. They hijack an ambulance and try to escape across the desert, facing many obstacles. Also featuring Sal Mineo, Madlyn Rhue, Jack Warden, Anthony Caruso, Jay Novello, Joseph Ruskin, and James Mason. This movie isn't bad, just highly derivative. Much of it resembles Ice Cold in Alex (1958), with desperate characters struggling to survive in a truck in the harsh desert. Some cursory time is spent lamenting Western exploitation of oil-rich nations, but it doesn't go into much depth. Still, there are worse ways to waste 90 minutes.

Source: internet

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4 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

That's perfectly valid. I heard the original is better in this case. I guess it just wasn't my cup of tea. Maybe I was expecting something completely different? I don't know. Maybe I'll have better success with my next venture: Bonnie and Clyde (1967)... (seeing for the first time). 

I'll be curious to read your reactions to Bonnie & Clyde. It's a much-loved classic, but I didn't much care for it the first time I saw it. It has grown on me a bit since, but I don't like it nearly as much as some people, who rank as one of the greatest of all time.

Suspiria is a weird movie, and hard to like. Others have posted on here about not caring for it. I just clicked with the strange vibe, the colorful cinematography, and the crazy musical score, which I used to have on disc. "Strange and ugly" seem to be the kinds of movies I end up liking the most. 

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Fear No Evil (1981)  -  5/10

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Interesting, weird, independently-made supernatural religious horror film. Lucifer and the archangel Raphael are locked in eternal battle, destined to be reborn in new bodies every few generations. Strange high school student Andy Williams (Stefan Arngrim, the kid from the Land of the Giants TV show) is the latest incarnation of Lucifer, and as he begins to realize his infernal power, he causes death and chaos among his classmates and the community. Also featuring Elizabeth Hoffman, Kathleen Rowe McAllen, Frank Birney, Daniel Eden, John Holland, Barry Cooper, and Alice Sachs. Much of this doesn't work, as the script is muddled, the mythology confused, and the acting amateurish by most. However, there are some nicely composed shots with atmospheric lighting, the soundtrack improbably includes songs from Talking Heads, Ramones, Patti Smith, the Boomtown Rats, and Sex Pistols, and the last half hour or so goes all out, with zombies, sacrifices, bizarre nudity, and light-show effects. Filmed in Rochester, Webster, and Alexandria Bay, New York.

Source: YouTube

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Mac and Me (1988)

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If I had alcohol, it would only cause me to have a dark existential crisis. No amount can make it enjoyable, much less a rewatch of it. At 2 AM. Again. What was good about it? Maybe all those dogs. Dogs are nice. Some of them were fluffy. And the impromptu dance party where everybody synced up and danced the party away, not before the dancing straight out of Breakin' or Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo, either of which are better in every way. Ronald McDonald? Why not. Sears? That's old. I'm grasping at straws here. Hah, straws! Because they use straws. That's the high quality comedy the movie has.

The bad? Everything. I don't know where to begin.

Mac and his family? Freakishly ugly. Not ugly cute, but fell down the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down into the ugly briar patch. The eyes move in ways that peer into your very soul without looking directly at you; mouths affixed in a sucking notion as if they would willingly suck the brain juices out of you. Lanky and yet malleable, able to contort into long, thin, organ squishing shapes or be splattered on a windshield. I can excuse the occasional string popping up with the creatures or some blatant CGI or horrible puppetry but that is the kind of thing that prevents you from sleeping comfortably at night.

Characters? Not worth mentioning. But am still amazed at the Fed's endurance at booking it after some kid going down a massive gently sloping hill, dodging traffic and hustling around a Sears mall without any of the suits getting close to nabbing him. I actually don't remember anybody's name.

After thinking for a few minutes, there might have been a Debbie.

Music? What is it called? Oscar bait? Some feel-good jam that's meant to win hearts of millions? It sure didn't for me.

Thinking about it really makes me contemplate life, meaning, and why someone thought of making a movie like this. But the world is still good, because they haven't returned.

1/10, I'm just going to skip it the next time it's on TCM Underground, probably before the year is up. Almost anything TCM could show on Underground is better than this. This is just above Robot vs Aztec Mummy which itself is on par with the pick that follows this.

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Experiment in Terror (1962)  -  7/10

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Excellent thriller from director Blake Edwards. A bank teller (Lee Remick) is threatened by an asthmatic creep (Ross Martin), who threatens to murder Remick's younger sister (Stefanie Powers) unless Lee agrees to steal money from her employer. FBI agent Glenn Ford is notified of the situation, and he and his fellow lawmen try to find Martin before he can carry out his threats. Also featuring Ned Glass, Anita Loo, Roy Poole, Patricia Huston, James T. Callahan, and Clifton James. The B&W cinematography is fantastic and the performances good, with Martin the most intriguing. He dresses up in a costume in one scene, which reminded me of his later role on Wild, Wild West. Future director David Lynch is said to be a big fan of this, and it's had a strong influence on his work; some moments from this he's borrowed for his own work, and the neighborhood Remick's character lives in is "Twin Peaks".

Source: The Criterion Channel

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16 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I love Suspiria (1977). One of my favorite horror films. I hated the recent remake, though.

I could let loose a NED FLANDERS SCREAM just thinking about the BARBED WIRE SCENE.

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The selections for TCM UNDERGROUND, while paired thoughtfully, have been disappointing lately.

I'm still hoping for a THE DEVILS (1971)/THE WICKER MAN (1971) double feature.

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The Fabulous Baron Munchausen (1962)  -  7/10

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Czech fantasy that is an unusual blend of live-action and animation, giving it a storybook feel. A cosmonaut named Tony (Rudolf Jelinek) lands on the moon only to discover the 18th-century Baron Munchausen (Milos Kopecky) is already there. The Baron brings Tony back to Earth, but in the 18th century, where they fight the Ottomans, rescue a princess (Jana Brejchova), get swallowed by a whale, and much more. The scenes are tinted various colors, the sets are very stylized and almost cartoonish, and the performances are appropriately broad. There are slow patches in the story, though not enough to derail things too much. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

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17 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

SUSPIRIA (1977) *Score: 4/10*

I found Jessica Harper's "acting" very wooden. I preferred her in "Pennies from Heaven" (1981). She seemed much more natural in that one.

Image result for suspiria 1977

American actors working for ARGENTO ALWAYS seem dubbed even when they're not, there's a sleepwalking quality to their work....

I really liked PENNIES FROM HEAVEN when I saw it recently, and honestly, if I could've picked ONLY ONE member of the cast to get an Oscar nomination, it would've been her. it is SUCH  a difficult role and she is very good in it.

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