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I Just Watched...

18,805 posts in this topic

10 hours ago, kingrat said:

Lawrence, what you won't see in today's movies is Chinese villains. A friend of mine co-authored a script for an action movie where the villain was Chinese. He and his writing partner were told that Chinese villains are out, because China is such an important market for action movies.

You'd think a serious reboot of Charlie Chan with obviously a Chinese actor in the lead would be a winner.

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Caught about half of the Glass Bottom Boat last night, anybody else notice that quite a few of the cast members ended up in Bewitched?¬†ūüėé

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

the director's sole interest in making this were the fox hunting scenes, the last of which he even cameos in as a participant. I can do without seeing that scumbag pastime

Uh, could you please not be so judgmental? There are many traditional sports that have completely evolved  eliminating any harm to animals. Modern Fox Hunting is just an equestrian cross country group ride (sometimes including dogs) with zero actual "hunting" involved. 

Think back to when people raised their own food; eliminating fox, weasel, badgers, etc was a necessity. Some predators are too clever & vicious for passive protective aversion and just have to be eliminated. I once had my entire flock violently wiped out overnight by a fisher who left all carcasses uneaten. It even decapitated a cat among it's killing frenzy.

It's the same as if your foundation was infested with termites-you'd "eliminate" them, but no one grieves for insects, reptiles or rats, do they?

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38 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Uh, could you please not be so judgmental? There are many traditional sports that have completely evolved  eliminating any harm to animals. Modern Fox Hunting is just an equestrian cross country group ride (sometimes including dogs) with zero actual "hunting" involved. 

Think back to when people raised their own food; eliminating fox, weasel, badgers, etc was a necessity. Some predators are too clever & vicious for passive protective aversion and just have to be eliminated. I once had my entire flock violently wiped out overnight by a fisher who left all carcasses uneaten. It even decapitated a cat among it's killing frenzy.

It's the same as if your foundation was infested with termites-you'd "eliminate" them, but no one grieves for insects, reptiles or rats, do they?

Not everyone feels as casual about fox hunting as you do, Tiki Soo. Lawrence has plenty of company.

 

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Caught about half of the Glass Bottom Boat last night, anybody else notice that quite a few of the cast members ended up in Bewitched?¬†ūüėé

YES. Or were there already. I think the series debuted in 1964, before Boat was filmed.....

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Lord of the Flies (1963)  -  6/10

flies-11.jpg

British allegorical drama from director Peter Brook, based on William Golding's novel. A bunch of schoolboys end up stranded on a tropical island when their plane crashes. They are left with no adult supervision, so they soon descend into savagery. I'm not crazy about movies starring children, and this is nothing but kids. Most of the performances were bad, and I haven't seen a movie where so many actors glanced directly into the camera so often. The kid with the broken glasses was the worst, with painfully bad line deliveries. However, there is quite a bit of artistry in the B&W cinematography. I may have liked this more if I weren't in such a foul mood, but it's not likely. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

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I watched PITFALL last night. At first I thought it was Philip Marlowe meets Father Knows Best in a softer version of DOUBLE INDEMNITY, but it turned out to be quite enjoyable. Dick Powell, Jane Wyatt and Raymond Burr were all good in their roles and Lizabeth Scott was perfect as the femme fatale. 

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Magnet of Doom (1963)  -  6/10

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French drama with Jean-Paul Belmondo as a failed boxer who takes a job as the personal secretary to wealthy banker Charles Vanel. It seems the banker is embroiled in scandal and will soon be arrested, so he travels to NYC with Belmondo in tow in hopes of evading capture. They learn that the US may extradite Vanel, so the duo drives from NYC to New Orleans, there to catch a ship to South America. The film largely concerns their road trip. Also featuring Michele Mercier, Malvina Silberberg, and Stefania Sandrelli. Director Jean-Pierre Melville shoots in widescreen color, but the movie looks the worse for it. He couldn't afford to shoot in the US beyond some B-roll stuff, so the main characters are either on sets, in rear-projection cars, or in the French countryside, which doesn't look like any roads in the American south. A lot of the "American" dialogue and set dressing is phony, as well. Belmondo isn't bad. I enjoyed seeing Vanel, who had been in French films going back to the 1910's. The English title sounds like a chapter from a 30's serial.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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The Man from the Diners' Club (1963)  -  5/10

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Weak comedy starring Danny Kaye as a neurotic employee of the Diners Club credit card company. He erroneously issues a card to notorious mobster "Foots" Pulardos (Telly Savalas), and is ordered to get it back. However, Pulardos has other plans for Kaye, as the gangster wants to use Kaye to help fake his death. Also featuring Cara Williams, Martha Hyer, George Kennedy, Everett Sloane, Kaye Stevens, Jay Novello, Bernie Kopell, and Harry Dean Stanton. This proved to be Kaye's final starring role, and it's perhaps the least of his films that I've seen. Savalas wears a dark toupee, which is odd looking. Williams is amusing as Telly's gal-pal with a bit of a drinking problem. I watched it for Stanton, who shows up as a beatnik late in the proceedings. Directed by Frank Tashlin from a script by William Peter Blatty (his first).

Source: internet

 

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Lord of the Flies (1963)  -  6/10

flies-11.jpg

British allegorical drama from director Peter Brook, based on William Golding's novel. A bunch of schoolboys end up stranded on a tropical island when their plane crashes. They are left with no adult supervision, so they soon descend into savagery. I'm not crazy about movies starring children, and this is nothing but kids. Most of the performances were bad, and I haven't seen a movie where so many actors glanced directly into the camera so often. The kid with the broken glasses was the worst, with painfully bad line deliveries. However, there is quite a bit of artistry in the B&W cinematography. I may have liked this more if I weren't in such a foul mood, but it's not likely. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

The real problem with the film is that the soundtrack had to be re-recorded - and it doesn't quite match the action on the screen.

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Maniac (1963)  -  5/10

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Sub-par British thriller from Hammer Films. Kerwin Mathews stars as an American who gets stranded in the south of France. He takes up with an innkeeper (Nadia Gray) and her daughter (Liliane Brousse), who get him entangled with a plot to free the innkeeper's husband (Donald Houston) who in a prison for the criminally insane. Also featuring George Pastell, Arnold Diamond, Norman Bird, Justine Lord, and Jerold Wells. The script is by Jimmy Sangster and direction by Michael Carreras, both Hammer regulars, but this ends up being a lesser effort, never building up any appreciable suspense or atmosphere.

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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The Mind Benders (1963)  -  6/10

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British drama starring Dirk Bogarde as a scientist experimenting with sensory deprivation. When a fellow professor dies as a result, a government man (John Clements) investigates, and realizes that Bogarde and his associates may have stumbled on a way to effectively brainwash people. They decide to test that theory on Bogarde, to tragic results. Also featuring Mary Ure, Michael Bryant, Wendy Craig, Harold Goldblatt, Edward Fox, and Geoffrey Keen. The acting is good, but the story lacks punch, and the direction is flat and matter-of-fact. 

Source: TCM

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What Waits Below (1984)  -  6/10

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Cheesy yet enjoyable adventure film that sees a group of explorers entering a massive cave system only to discover a lost civilization of albino mutants. Starring Robert Powell, Lisa Blount, Timothy Bottoms, Anne Heywood, Richard Johnson, A.C. Weary, Jackson Bostwick, and Liam Sullivan. I liked this in a Saturday-matinee way, knowing full well its many shortcomings but liking it anyway. I'm a sucker for lost civilization stories. There's a bit of tacked-on gore that was unnecessary, and it takes a bit too long to get to the good stuff, but this entertained me. Also released as Secrets of the Phantom Caverns, this was shot in Cumberland Caverns, Tennessee, and Cathedral Caverns, Alabama.

Source: YouTube

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16 hours ago, TomJH said:

Not everyone feels as casual about fox hunting as you do, Tiki Soo. Lawrence has plenty of company.

 

I really like the film based on Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises".

 That's where we have both bull fights and the running of the bulls.

I wonder if there have been any films protesting bullfighting?

As for foxes, they often would come in my backyard on Sunday afternoon and lie in the Sun.

 But that was long after my dogs had left the premises. LOL

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22 hours ago, TomJH said:

Not everyone feels as casual about fox hunting as you do, Tiki Soo. Lawrence has plenty of company.

Hey, I'm right on board hating killing for sport (or food-I bet you all love your burgers) but felt defensive when my hobby was derided. How would you feel if as a tennis player, someone called racket sports a "scumbag pastime"?

I understand, I'm sickened too by the tradition of fox hunting, but understand the "sport" has root in necessity and has evolved into having nothing to do with hunting or even fox at all. Just trying to be informative.

Bullfighting....I feel the same way. I believe there is one country (Portugal?) that do not harm the bull at all. 

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25 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Hey, I'm right on board hating killing for sport (or food-I bet you all love your burgers) but felt defensive when my hobby was derided. How would you feel if as a tennis player, someone called racket sports a "scumbag pastime"?

I understand, I'm sickened too by the tradition of fox hunting, but understand the "sport" has root in necessity and has evolved into having nothing to do with hunting or even fox at all. Just trying to be informative.

Bullfighting....I feel the same way. I believe there is one country (Portugal?) that do not harm the bull at all. 

Any sport that involves cruelty to an animal will be bound to receive an emotional reaction from many, as you know. Fox hunting and bullfighting certainly both qualify.

I went through a Hemingway phase when I was young and, among his novels, I read Death in the Afternoon (which I quite enjoyed despite its subject of bullfighting). I recall that he wrote of one toreador who was overweight and had to suck in his belly whenever the bull passed right past him. Once the horns of the animal past by him, however, he then let his stomach sag. It almost sounded like a shtick for Oliver Hardy or Lou Costello.

Aside from the fate that the bull would face, the other cruelty in the sport is what happens to the horses. That is why the picadors on horseback have all the cover over the horses. It doesn't protect the animals from the horns. It's to shield the arena spectators from seeing the innards of the horses after they are frequently gored. Yet another reason why the sport is so controversial, even in Spain.

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I think bullfighting would be more "sporting" if the matador were given a knife instead of a sword, and they eliminated the PICADORs .  AND that jazz with the cape.  Stepping aside as the bull passes and sweeping the cape over it's face makes it more of a DANCE than a fight. All in all though....

I think DOG FIGHTS are FAR more despicable than a bullfight.  :angry:

Sepiatone

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I can't think of many films that dealt with bullfighting as a subject but the chief one that comes to mind is director Budd Boetticher's THE BULLFIGHTER AND THE LADY, released through John Wayne's production company.

Robert Stack plays a cocky American skeet shoot champion who travels to Mexico and, as more or less as a lark, decides that he wants to be taught how to be a toreador. Gilbert Roland plays an old time celebrated toreador who finally agrees to teach him.

There are some gripping moments in the ring and, in one of his most serious screen characterizations, I think Roland had his finest hour. Another performer who scores well in this film is the magnificent Katy Jurado, playing Roland's wife who worries about him while standing by him, aware of the pressures he feels as a national hero.

The film has a great scene in which a drunken lout baits Roland (who has injured his hand) into facing a bull. Roland, feeling his image on the line, agrees to do so. Afterward Jurado crosses the ring with a sword in her hand, all eyes upon her, to confront the drunken lout. The scorn she heaps upon him as he starts to cower, while flashing that sword at him causing him to flinch, is a genuine highlight moment in the film.

As a young lad growing up in Mexico Roland had been interested in becoming a bullfighter before the acting bug bit him. Better the acting bug than a bull's horns.

Budd Boetticher would later call Bullfighter, along with Seven Men From Now, one of his two best films.

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"Marlowe" - Paul Bogart - 1969 -

starring James Garner, Gayle Hunnicutt, Rita Moreno, Sharon Farrell, Carroll O'Connor, Wiliam Daniels, etc. -

a different take on the character of Philip Marlowe -

James Garner plays it in the style of a romp -

as far as he is concerned, it is light and lively all the time -

but you might prefer Philip Marlowe in the style of Bogart, or Powell -

the film itself is exceedingly nasty -

there is an ice pick murderer on the loose -

and Marlowe is knee-deep in girls -

the least of which is the female star, Gayle Hunnicutt, who is so plastic that you wait for her to break -

the plot seems a little too contrived -

a little too confusing -

and, in the end, it doesn't quite hang together -

however, Rita Moreno gets one hell of a climax -

has anyone had a more spectacular exit? -

Garner has one hell of a time -

girls are everywhere -

but this film has almost no reputation -

so a light and lively Marlowe wasn't such a hit with the audience -

marlowe-1969-movie-review-philip-christy

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12 minutes ago, rayban said:

"Marlowe" - Paul Bogart - 1969 -

but this film has almost no reputation -

It's primarily remembered now for the brief appearance by Bruce Lee.

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It's primarily remembered now for the brief appearance by Bruce Lee.

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Yes, he was memorable - and scary, too - and so well-spoken.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Hey, I'm right on board hating killing for sport (or food-I bet you all love your burgers) but felt defensive when my hobby was derided. How would you feel if as a tennis player, someone called racket sports a "scumbag pastime"?

I understand, I'm sickened too by the tradition of fox hunting, but understand the "sport" has root in necessity and has evolved into having nothing to do with hunting or even fox at all. Just trying to be informative.

Bullfighting....I feel the same way. I believe there is one country (Portugal?) that do not harm the bull at all. 

Then we're really on the same page. If your pastime does not include chasing and killing an animal merely for sport or trophy, then I'm not referring to you. I'm speaking to the specific fox hunting of the 20th century that was viewed as an elevated pastime of the aristocracy that, while it may have originated as a necessary culling of livestock predators, was by then only about the "sport" of terrorizing and killing the fox as to have bragging rights and the tail as trophy. 

If they have modified the chase to not include the killing of the foxes, or to eliminate the fox aspect altogether, then I don't have as much of a problem with it. We could get into another discussion about the injuries the horses can sustain, but that's not what I was referring to with my original labeling of fox hunting, as depicted in the movie The List of Adrian Messenger, which I still maintain is a more than regrettable pastime, but was not meant to impugn you or your activities, unless of course they include hunting animals for trophy or sport, in which case... 

And yeah, I detest bull fighting, as I've stated repeatedly, and there are far too many movies in which the activity appears. In fact, I'll probably be watching another one in the next week or two. 

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I seem to recall that one of Bob Hope's specials had a parody called "The Mess of Adrian Listinger."

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GONE TO EARTH (1947?) Is one of the best films I’ve seen that incorporates the special cruelty of fox hunting into its plot.

In fact I want to say the title comes from a phrase used when hunting foxes meaning that it’s gone into a hole in the ground.

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