speedracer5

I Just Watched...

21,374 posts in this topic

The Conquest of the Air  (1936)  -  6/10

137262-the-conquest-of-the-air-0-230-0-3

British docudrama that charts the evolution of man's attempts at flight. Notable moments in aviation history are recreated, often to comical effect. Featuring Laurence Olivier, Frederick Culley, Franklin Dyall, Henry Victor, Hay Petrie, and John Turnbull. Much of this is comprised of documentary newsreel footage, with the whole film narrated  by Charles Frend. It's a short, mildly amusing, and quickly forgettable piece of pre-WWII propaganda.

Source: YouTube

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

all apologies to RAYBAN, he posted a review of this movie and I have gone back to try and read it (I hadn't finished watching when it was was posted, so i did not read it) and I CAN'T FIND IT. It's probably right in front of me, sometimes on these scrolling sites, something can be right the hell in front of me and i miss it.

anyhoo, i turned on TCM the other morning just to have some white noise on while i got my coffee and my **** together. and SWANN IN LOVE (1984) was on...it's a FRENCH LANGUAGE adaptation of part of MARCEL PROUST'S REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST.

95zIS4eWiJHEYWsmOeYoHRUVWkl.jpg

I DID NOT EXPECT TO GET INTO IT at all, but then I look up from my phone to see IRONS' character finger-banging a cattleya orchid corsage atop ORNELLA MUTI'S healthy decollotage and I decided I needed to go back and watch this thing from the beginning.

i'm glad i did.

I had a hard time getting past the fact that JEREMY IRONS' marvelous KARLOFFIAN VOICE was dubbed by that of another actor, he is still marvelous in his part; at several points he wears a monocle and looks like a sexy cousin of COUNT VON COUNT. He was, I'm sure, annoyed to be dubbed, but he makes up for it by doing some MARVELOUS things WITH HIS FACE.

Slightly off-topic- but this movie really got me wondering just why exactly it was that IRONS fell off the map after finally winning BEST ACTOR after several overlooked performances in the 80's. I can only chalk it up to he must be really difficult or really eccentric or a heady mix of the two. Nonetheless, I can think of scores of movies made in the last three decades that would've benefited from his presence immensely.

ITALIAN HUMAN/CAT HYBRID ORNELLA MUTI is in this, I knew her from OSCAR and FLASH GORDON and have worshiped at her feet since I was a child. She is SUCH A TOTAL MOVIE STAR. She is also dubbed, and it's a rare case of an ACTRESS being so beautiful, I have no idea if she's any good or not in the role- it doesn't really matter BECAUSE YOU CANNOT LOOK AWAY FROM HER.

I wonder if they lured her to the set each morning with a crystal dish of FANCY FEAST with a sprig of parsely atop it...

ALAIN DELON is terrific in a very small almost non sequitor part, nonetheless, the film benefits from his presence and he has a marvelous scene where he spurns a lover so artfully, i really want to go back and get a quote of what he says in case i ever need to use it.

it's a GORGEOUS FILM with METHODICAL PERIOD DETAIL and some great cinematography- the FLORIST BUDGET MUST'VE BEEN HUGE! There are PALMS and ORCHIDS and ferns and hothouse lillies filling every nook and cranny- all in pristine shape...I especially loved the LANGUID conservatory in the background of MUTI'S apartment. 

this movie would make a GREAT COMPANION PIECE TO THE AGE OF INNOCENCE (1993)- they are very very similar in many ways, only this one has multiple topless scenes.

That the filmmakers could have gotten this film out of Marcel Proust's famous masterpiece is a miracle.

It is an exquisite film.

From what I've read over the years, Jeremy Irons didn't like to become involved in commercial properties.

He is an extraordinary actor.

I saw him on-stage in "The Real Thing" and his stage presence was magnetic.

The film does have a very strong cast.

What's your take on the ending - did Charles Swann get a life that he wasn't exxpecting?

(My review is on page 785.)

87065_full.jpg

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Fate Is The Hunter" - Ralph Nelson - 1964 -

starring Glenn Ford, Nancy Kwan, Rod Taylor, Suzanne Pleshette.,etc.

Strange movie -

a plane crash, almost everyone is killed, the pilot is suspected of being drunk -

his good friend tries to salvage his reputation and prove that he wasn't drunk -

he does, but this portion takes up most of the movie -

it plays somewhat like a whodunit -

okay, so what happened -

by re-enacting the tragedy, the good friend proves that it was a spilled coffee cup -

which sort-circuited the wiring of the engines -

it plays out very weakly - especially in this day and age -

where this ending would probably be laughed at -

still, the film is both well-directed and well-acted -

and there's an unbilled appearance by Dorothy Malone -

I think that the problem with the film -

is that you just know that the pilot wasn't drunk -

that somethng more dire was up -

but a spilled coffee cup? - 

 

0*pXsiooEXhetU03aJ.jpg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Its used in Neo Noir Marlowe (1969) also.

Yeah, I remember it in that film's opening credits. It's the film I never saw all of. I got as far as the point where James Garner got stabbed with the ice pick (but he survives of course)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, rayban said:

"Fate Is The Hunter" - Ralph Nelson - 1964 -

starring Glenn Ford, Nancy Kwan, Rod Taylor, Suzanne Pleshette.,etc.

Strange movie -

a plane crash, almost everyone is killed, the pilot is suspected of being drunk -

his good friend tries to salvage his reputation and prove that he wasn't drunk -

he does, but this portion takes up most of the movie -

it plays somewhat like a whodunit -

okay, so what happened -

by re-enacting the tragedy, the good friend proves that is was a spilled coffee cup -

which sort-circuited  the wiring  of the engines -

it plays out very weakly -

still,  the film is both well-directed and well-acted -

and there's an unbilled appearance by Dorothy Malone -

0*pXsiooEXhetU03aJ.jpg

It has been making the rounds several times a week recently on FXM and I caught it there. The acting is indeed its strong suit, as the film itself is a bit diffuse and meandering. But who can carp about the performances from Ford, Pleshette, Kwan, Malone, and Wickes?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

It has been making the rounds several times a week recently on FXM and I caught it there. The acting is indeed its strong suit, as the film itself is a bit diffuse and meandering. But who can carp about the performances from Ford, Pleshette, Kwan, Malone, and Wickes?

Sorry, I didn't quite finiish up my review.

It got away from me.

Rod Taylor is very good, too.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, rayban said:

"Fate Is The Hunter" - Ralph Nelson - 1964 -

To me, it came across as something that would have been a (very good) TV movie of the week had it been made a few years later.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Yeah, I remember it in that film's opening credits. It's the film I never saw all of. I got as far as the point where James Garner got stabbed with the ice pick (but he survives of course)

There is another split screen sequence later on also, and if I remember right it goes into a triple screen at one point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intermezzo  (1936)  -  6/10

Intermezzo_Kizirian-750x400.jpg

Swedish drama about a famous violinist (Gosta Ekman) who has an affair with his daughter's piano teacher (Ingrid Bergman). Later remade with Leslie Howard in the lead, who insisted on bringing Bergman over to reprise her role, starting her Hollywood career. I think I liked the remake more, but this will still be of interest to fans of Bergman.

Source: The Criterion Channel

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lonely Trail  (1936)  -  5/10

20048_1_front.jpg

Minor western with John Wayne as a former Union soldier helping to thwart a carpetbagger (Cy Kendall) in Texas. With Ann Rutherford, Bob Kortman, Dennis Moore, Yakima Canutt, and Fred "Snowflake" Toones. This is another of the programmer westerns Wayne churned out in the 30's. The post-Civil War setting and political issues are all that distinguish it from the others.

Source: internet

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Twice Branded aka Father and Son  (1936)  -  6/10

British drama with Robert Rendel as Charles Hamilton, a once prominent businessman who has spent the last 12 years in prison for financial crimes. Upon his release he hopes to have a relationship with his now grown children, but his daughter has been told that he died to save her from the scandal. He pretends to be a long lost uncle, and he discovers that his son (James Mason) may be getting into the same troublesome dealings that sent him up the river. Also featuring Lucille Lisle, Eve Gray, Mickey Brantford, and Ethel Griffies. This is a barely-serviceable melodrama buoyed by a good performance by Rendel. I watched it for Mason, here making only his second film appearance.

Source: internet

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just put the review up for The Blue Lamp (1950) in Film Noir/Gangster pages though I watched it a few weeks ago.

Poster.jpg

Directed by Basil Dreaden (Cage of Gold (1950), Pool Of London (1951)). Written by T.E.B. Clarke, with Jan Read and Ted Willis credited for original treatment. Additional dialogue was by Alexander Mackendrick. Cinematography was by Gordon Dines.

The film stars Jack Warner as PC George Dixon, Jimmy Hanley as PC Andy Mitchell, Dirk Bogarde as hood Tom Riley, Peggy Evans as Diana Lewis, Patric Doonan as hood Spud, Bruce Seton as PC Campbell, Gladys Henson as Mrs. Dixon, Frederick Piper as Alf Lewis, Tessie O'Shea as herself, and Sam Kydd as Bookmakers Assistant White City (uncredited)

The film boasts a couple of great high speed auto chases through the Paddington district of West London. They probably influenced Robbery (1967) which influenced McQueen's Bullit (1968). It was, for me anyway, a bit ear opening to hear a loud double clank bell sound coming from the pursuing police "wireless" car rather that a wailing siren. It's reminiscent of the sound of the type of thumb activated bell that a kid would have attached to the handlebar of a tricycle, only much louder.

The Blue Lamp is also a bit similar to M where both the police and the professional criminals join forces to apprehend a cop killer.

All the actors are excellent, and the story is nicely balanced. It provides a great archival snapshot of 1949/50 London. Screencaps are in review in Film Noir/Gangster. 9/10

P.S. Off to South Shore for the weekend don't know if I'll be able to respond, and eat your hearts out....

LumHLX2.jpg

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I just put the review up for The Blue Lamp (1950) in Film Noir/Gangster pages though I watched it a few weeks ago.

Poster.jpg

Directed by Basil Dreaden (Cage of Gold (1950), Pool Of London (1951)). Written by T.E.B. Clarke, with Jan Read and Ted Willis credited for original treatment. Additional dialogue was by Alexander Mackendrick. Cinematography was by Gordon Dines.

The film stars Jack Warner as PC George Dixon, Jimmy Hanley as PC Andy Mitchell, Dirk Bogarde as hood Tom Riley, Peggy Evans as Diana Lewis, Patric Doonan as hood Spud, Bruce Seton as PC Campbell, Gladys Henson as Mrs. Dixon, Frederick Piper as Alf Lewis, Tessie O'Shea as herself, and Sam Kydd as Bookmakers Assistant White City (uncredited)

The film boasts a couple of great high speed auto chases through the Paddington district of West London. They probably influenced Robbery (1967) which influenced McQueen's Bullit (1968). It was, for me anyway, a bit ear opening to hear a loud double clank bell sound coming from the pursuing police "wireless" car rather that a wailing siren. It's reminiscent of the sound of the type of thumb activated bell that a kid would have attached to the handlebar of a tricycle, only much louder.

The Blue Lamp is also a bit similar to M where both the police and the professional criminals join forces to apprehend a cop killer.

All the actors are excellent, and the story is nicely balanced. It provides a great archival snapshot of 1949/50 London. Screencaps are in review in Film Noir/Gangster. 9/10

P.S. Off to South Shore for the weekend don't know if I'll be able to respond, and eat your hearts out....

LumHLX2.jpg

 

I can't imagine Dirk Bogarde as a hood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Image result for all my sons film imagesAll My Sons (1948) 8/10

 

This was a rewatch of this film version of Arthur Miller's play, his first big hit. I saw it in a NYC revival theater. Just last month I saw the new Broadway version with Annette Bening, Tracy Letts and Benjamin Walker. It's a still powerful study of a wealthy man who ships defective airplane parts during WWII, caring more about money than men's lives.

The film version has it's own great power, Edward G. Robinson gives one of best performances and Burt Lancaster is just as great as the conflicted son. I don't know if it's shown on TCM but deserves to be seen again.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Image result for all my sons film imagesAll My Sons (1948) 8/10

 

This was a rewatch of this film version of Arthur Miller's play, his first big hit. I saw it in a NYC revival theater. Just last month I saw the new Broadway version with Annette Bening, Tracy Letts and Benjamin Walker. It's a still powerful study of a wealthy man who ships defective airplane parts during WWII, caring more about money than men's lives.

The film version has it's own great power, Edward G. Robinson gives one of best performances and Burt Lancaster is just as great as the conflicted son. I don't know if it's shown on TCM but deserves to be seen again.

All My Sons was shown at this year's Palm Springs Film Noir Festival, although it isn't noir. The fact that there's a quality print sometimes makes it likelier that it might show up on TCM. I agree that it's well worth seeing, especially for fans of Robinson and Lancaster.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, rayban said:

That the filmmakers could have gotten this film out of Marcel Proust's famous masterpiece is a miracle.

[SWANN IN LOVE (1984)] is an exquisite film.

what's your take on the ending - did Charles Swann get a life that he wasn't exxpecting?

Don't we all?- said in with the jaded intensity of ALAIN DELON'S character.

 

I really liked the ending of SWANN IN LOVE and can't help but perceive it as a more or less "happy" one...it hued in many ways VERY CLOSELY to the ending of THE AGE OF INNOCENCE, only ambiguously happy...although I found it odd that the score was so INTENSE (all BERNARD HERRMANN-like STRINGS) during the scene of Madame Swann crossing through the plaza- THAT was the one thing THAT MADE me think maybe all was not well.

JEREMY IRONS did a wonderful job of playing old and feeble...ORNELLA MUTI looked THE EXACT SAME, although I will note that I googled her and she is 65 or so now AND SHE LOOKS about 45 and AMAZING and her character at the end is in her late thirties so...you know, HOW CAN AN ENDING WHERE YOU END UP WITH MINT-CONDITION  ORNELLA MUTI FOR TWENTY OR SO YEARS THEN DYING BEFORE THE WORLD GOES COMPLETELY TO HELL IN THE 20TH CENTURY BE ALL THAT BAD?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THIS is ORNELLA MUTI, AGE 64 IN 2018.

I mean, DAMN.

Deal with the Devil? Olive oil? That purple stuff from Isabella Rosselini's living room?

WHAT IS IT, ORNELLA???????????

italy-milan-february-62018-ornella-600w-

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TWO MORNINGS in a row, I turned on the TV just to have white noise, and on both occasions ran across films by chance that were so interesting, i rewatched them later and paid more attention.

One was SWANN IN LOVE, the other was SPOOK BUSTERS (1946), starring LEO GORCEY AND THE BOWERY BOYS. (Apparently GORCEY was LIONEL RICHIE to the BOWERY COMMODORES and got DIANA ROSS-STYLE top billing over the rest of the gang. as charming as i admit GORCEY can be, it's a group act though, and his schtick would get old BUT FAST without the rest of the guys around. )

51Rw+fufRaL._AC_SY400_.jpg

this was a (mostly) genuinely funny movie and there is a bit at the end about some SPILLED ETHER in a lab that is either taken from a BUGS BUNNY CARTOON or it inspired it, but it's pretty damn funny in and of its own self. there's also some running gags about Post War lack of employment and housing and goods. 

I think it's safe to say, a fair amount of this inspired A LOT of ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Redes  (1936)  -  7/10

Redes-1936-dir.-Fred-Zinnemann-y-Emilio-

Mexican docudrama from directors Emilio Gomez Muriel and Fred Zinnemann. Poor fisherman on the Gulf Coast struggle to survive on the meager pay doled out by the rich families that control the fishing industry in the area. When a shortage of fish leads to even more poverty, the fisherman decide to make a stand. With Silvio Hernandez, David Valle Gonzalez, Rafael Hinojosa, Antonio Lara, and Miguel Figueroa. Made with non-actors and originally intended as a straight documentary, a script was added during production to broaden the film's appeal. Zinnemann handled the technical aspects of the film, while Muriel dealt with the actors. The result is largely successful, a neo-realist film that pre-dates the movement in Italy. The storyline is the sort of thing that would be branded as anti-capitalist in the 40's or 50's.

Source: The Criterion Channel

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Idol of the Crowds  (1937)  -  6/10

220px-Idol_of_the_Crowds_FilmPoster.jpeg

John Wayne plays hockey! The Duke stars as Johnny Hanson, a good-natured farmer who gets recruited to a struggling hockey team. He leads them to great success, but a gambling ring wants him to throw the big game, and are threatening violence if Johnny doesn't comply. What's the Duke gonna do?!? Featuring Sheila Bromley, Charles Brokaw, Bill Burrud, Jane Johns, Huntley Morgan, Virginia Brissac, Clem Bevans, and Russell Hopton. Hockey movies are rare enough, but add John Wayne to the mix and you have a real rarity. I've seen this same story several times, set in several sporting worlds, and there aren't any real surprises, but the milieu makes it worth a look for the curious.

Source: internet

ENT037JohnWayne-IdolofTheCrowds.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dollar  (1938)  -  6/10

MV5BMDMzYWNlZTUtOTU0MS00Y2MwLTk5YjYtYjUw

Swedish comedy/drama about three couples who are all friends and are all dealing with financial issues of one sort or another. There's also the chance that each man is in love with one of the other's wives. Starring Ingrid Bergman, Georg Rydeberg, Tutta Rolf, Kotti Chave, Birgit Tengroth, Hakan Westergren, Edvin Adolphson, and Elsa Burnett. Bergman looks exquisite in this, with several lingering close-ups illustrating how much the camera loved her. I enjoyed a skiing scene during a blizzard and a reindeer herd migration. Burnett plays as American heiress who stirs things up, and it's funny hearing her "American English" dialogue delivered with a heavy Swedish accent. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

b9e1dbde18aa19d6769ec6f1836a13a9.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

this was a (mostly) genuinely funny movie and there is a bit at the end about some SPILLED ETHER in a lab that is either taken from a BUGS BUNNY CARTOON or it inspired it, but it's pretty damn funny in and of its own self. 

Well, we've had Bugs Bunny cartoons inspired by the Bowery Boys:

WRE91xw.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

but a gambling ring wants him to throw the big game, and are threatening violence if Johnny doesn't comply. What's the Duke gonna do?!?

Bring in the Hanson brothers?  :D

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Burnett plays as American heiress who stirs things up, and it's funny hearing her "American English" dialogue delivered with a heavy Swedish accent. 

I enjoyed the movie too, and Burnett's character made me think of Purple Noon, where Alain Delon and the others are supposed to playing Americans.  As good as the movie is, they're not American at all. :o

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us