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I Just Watched...

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52 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i recall reading somewhere a rumor she was considered for the part of the daughter LOLA in DOUBLE INDEMNITY, whether that's true or not, I  cannot say.

Her marriage to JOHN AGAR was apparently as dark as the bleakest noir there was....i think it maybe even had something to do with her stepping away from acting...although she did do some TV in the 50's i think.

Yep. The following excerpt taken from her Wiki bio page, Lorna. I vaguely remember this program myself. Our family as probably watching her competition at the time...

Between January 1958 and September 1961, Temple hosted and narrated a successful NBC television anthology series of fairy-tale adaptations called Shirley Temple's Storybook. Episodes were one hour each, and Temple acted in three of the sixteen episodes. Temple's son made his acting debut in the Christmas episode, "Mother Goose".[74][75] The series was popular but faced issues. The show lacked the special effects necessary for fairy tale dramatizations, sets were amateurish, and episodes were not telecast in a regular time-slot.[76] The show was reworked and released in color in September 1960 in a regular time-slot as The Shirley Temple Show.[77][78] It faced stiff competition from Maverick, Lassie, Dennis the Menace, the 1960 telecast of The Wizard of Oz, and the Walt Disney anthology television series however, and was canceled at season's end in September 1961.[79]

 

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Cul-de-sac  (1966)  -  7/10

25-cul-de-sac-1966-roman-polanski.jpg?w=

Black comedy/suspense from writer-director Roman Polanski. Two injured gangsters (Lionel Stander and Jack MacGowran) on the run after a botched job hide out at a secluded castle estate occupied by a troubled married couple (Donald Pleasence and Francoise Dorleac). As tensions run high, personalities unravel, leading to a surprising climax or two. Also featuring Iain Quarrier, Geoffrey Sumner, Renee Houston, Robert Dorning, Marie Kean, William Franklyn, Trevor Delaney, and Jacqueline Bisset. Stander is terrific as the obnoxious, loud gangster Richard, while a very slim and very bald Pleasence has one of his better roles as the up-tight husband George. Dorleac, often appearing nude or semi-nude, is mercurial and memorable. I've read that the film was meant to elicit comparisons to Beckett's Waiting for Godot or the works of Harold Pinter, if that gives you any idea. 

Source: Criterion DVD

cul-de-sac-1966-francoise-dorleac-donald

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Good Times  (1967)  -  5/10

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Musical comedy vehicle for Sonny & Cher, which is also the directing debut of William Friedkin. S&C star as themselves, successful singers and entertainers who are offered their own starring movie by shady producer Mordicus (George Sanders). Sonny imagines various film genre scenarios, including a western, a Tarzan-like African adventure, and a noir detective thriller, while Cher struggles to put up with Sonny's silliness. Also featuring Norman Alden, Larry Duran, Lennie Weinrib, China Lee, Edy Williams, Hank Worden, and Micky Dolenz. This is pretty stupid, and the songs are passable at best. However, the anarchic spirit is commendable, and I laughed out loud at a couple of moments during the noir send-up.

Source: Kino Lorber DVD

goodtimes3.jpg

 

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4 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yep. The following excerpt taken from her Wiki bio page, Lorna. I vaguely remember this program myself. Our family as probably watching her competition at the time...

Between January 1958 and September 1961, Temple hosted and narrated a successful NBC television anthology series of fairy-tale adaptations called Shirley Temple's Storybook. Episodes were one hour each, and Temple acted in three of the sixteen episodes. The show was reworked and released in color in September 1960 in a regular time-slot as The Shirley Temple Show.[77][78] It faced stiff competition from Maverick, Lassie, Dennis the Menace, the 1960 telecast of The Wizard of Oz, and the Walt Disney anthology television series however, and was canceled at season's end in September 1961.[79]

Although it's a good portion of of that '60 color season that's since turned up on DVD/Prime:

https://www.amazon.com/The-Land-of-Oz/dp/B07DQBTWJ7/

(And she's still cute in her 20's/30's!  😁)

And yes, a...LOT of people were watching Lassie, but competing with Walt Disney was a fool's errand.

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Marketa Lazarova  (1967)  -  5/10

220px-Marketa_Lazarova_film_poster_1967_

Czech historical epic from director Frantisek Vlacil. In the Middle Ages, the members of a familial clan clashes with forces of the king and the church. Eventually Marketa Lazarova (Magda Vasaryova), the young daughter of the clan leader, is kidnapped by Mikolas (Frantisek Velecky) in retaliation of past wrongs, but the two fall in love. Considered by many the greatest Czech film ever made, I was sorely disappointed, finding it boring, too remote, and difficult to care about anyone or anything going on. The post-sync dialogue, the rapid shifts in narrative chronology, the extremely intrusive music, and the repeated use of point-of-view cinematography for no apparent advantage all further made this a chore to sit through for nearly three hours. However, I can't deny the B&W beauty of the snowy locations. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

Marketa-2.jpg

 

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Joe Kidd (1972).

Competently made western in which Clint Eastwood plays Joe Kidd, a man hired by a landowner/rancher (Robert Duvall) to find the leader of the Mexican-Americas who are fighting being cheated out of their land claims (John Saxon).  Kid realizes that his boss is evil, and switches sides.

Entertaining enough, with nothing particularly wrong and nothing that will make it particularly stand out from a hundred other westerns.  If you like westerns and/or Clint Eastwood, you'll really like it.

7/10.

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The Man Who Wouldn't Die (1942) -- a "Mike Shayne" mystery

This is one of those movies that seems as if it was being written as they shot it. Full of plot holes, annoying comedy, and silly stereotypes, it opens fairly promisingly: In the dark, men emerge from a stately home, carrying a corpse, which they bury in the garden. It's pretty much downhill from there. Paul Harvey plays the estate's owner, who is being investigated by the Senate, though it's unclear why. Marjorie Weaver plays his daughter, who calls in private eye Lloyd Nolan, to investigate a "ghost" and, later, a murder which didn't happen, because the "corpse" left the grave. Henry Wilcoxon plays a cipher of a character, this just before he created his great role as the Vicar in Mrs. Miniver. Helene Reynolds, Billy Bevan, Francis Ford have supporting roles. Olin Howland plays the bumbling police chief. There is a rather odd coroner, played by Jeff Corey, who was later blacklisted and became a famous acting teacher.

In any case, a disappointing mystery/private eye film which is given the usual murder and intrigue in a stately home treatment.  Marred by its attempt at humour and by its poor script, which often makes no sense. There is an odd car chase scene in which the "dead" man crashes and burns, but once again, is unharmed. This is not a horror film, unfortunately. 

Source: Fox Movie Channel

 

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1 hour ago, Fedya said:

Joe Kidd (1972).

Competently made western in which Clint Eastwood plays Joe Kidd, a man hired by a landowner/rancher (Robert Duvall) to find the leader of the Mexican-Americas who are fighting being cheated out of their land claims (John Saxon).  Kid realizes that his boss is evil, and switches sides.

Entertaining enough, with nothing particularly wrong and nothing that will make it particularly stand out from a hundred other westerns.  If you like westerns and/or Clint Eastwood, you'll really like it.

7/10.

It's actually a loose remake of 1968's The Great Silence a Spaghetti Western directed by Sergio CorbucciJoe Kidd's story's plot points are loosely based on The Great Silence,i.e.,  outlaws up in the hills, bounty hunters from town after them, friendly bounty hunter (Eastwood) in Kidd,  Jean-Louis Trintignant in the first, etc. The big thing missing in Joe Kidd was the snow. Of course you have the Mauser Bolo machine pistol & Mingo's outfit is very similar to Loco's (Klaus Kinsky) (scarf over the head hat on top) look.

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The Birthday Party  (1968)  -  7/10

15756_5.jpg

Black comedy/drama written by Harold Pinter (based on his play), and directed by William Friedkin. In a dingy seaside boarding house, two strangers (Patrick Magee and Sydney Tafler) arrive, worrying sole boarder Stanley (Robert Shaw), who thinks they may be after him due to some unspecified past deed. The boarding house owner is a mentally off lady named Meg (Dandy Nichols), who insists that they throw a birthday party for Stanley, even if it isn't actually his birthday. Also featuring Moultrie Kelsall and Helen Fraser. I thought this was genuinely amusing in a dark, twisted way, with a lot of vague dialogue that may or may not have hidden meaning. The performances are all appropriately amped up, with Shaw and Magee the standouts, although I also liked Tafler, an actor I was unfamiliar with. Nichols is sort of like a British Shirley Booth, and I was also reminded of Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker, which I learned was a characterization based on Nichols in the British sitcom Till Death Do Us Part.

Source: Kino Lorber DVD 

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"Kathleen"  with Shirley Temple and Herbert Marshall.   Funny how Marshall kisses with his mouth closed.

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1 hour ago, Im4movies2 said:

"Kathleen"  with Shirley Temple and Herbert Marshall.   Funny how Marshall kisses with his mouth closed.

So why do you think poor Herbert so often played a guy whose wife cheats on him?! 

(...there's ya reason number-1 right there!)

;)

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Dracula  (1968)  -  7/10

dracula-68-6_i-am-dracula.jpg?w=700

British TV version of Bram Stoker's tale, adapted by Charles Graham for the series Mystery and Imagination. Denholm Elliott stars as Count Dracula, a recent emigre from Transylvania who is also an ancient undead vampire. As he begins preying on the innocent young Lucy Weston (Susan George), her beloved Dr. Seward (James Maxwell) and his mentor Professor Van Helsing (Bernard Archard) race to thwart the supernatural menace. With Suzanne Neve as Mina Harker, Corin Redgrave as Jonathan Harker, and Joan Hickson as Ms. Weston. Graham condenses a lot of stuff for this 75 minute version, including jettisoning the characters of Arthur Holmwood, Quincy Morris, and Renfield. In a unique move, Harker is made into the Renfield-type, a gibbering lunatic confined to an asylum, while Seward is elevated to chief protagonist. Elliott isn't bad as the Count, and he gets a good lengthy monologue. The blood-drinking scenes are highly sexualized, to a surprising degree given that this was for television.

Source: YouTube

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12 hours ago, Fedya said:

Joe Kidd (1972).

Competently made western in which Clint Eastwood plays Joe Kidd, a man hired by a landowner/rancher (Robert Duvall) to find the leader of the Mexican-Americas who are fighting being cheated out of their land claims (John Saxon).  Kid realizes that his boss is evil, and switches sides.

Entertaining enough, with nothing particularly wrong and nothing that will make it particularly stand out from a hundred other westerns.  If you like westerns and/or Clint Eastwood, you'll really like it.

7/10.

This was OK. Don Stroud plays another one of the slimy creeps he portrayed so often in the 1970s. My favorite scene is when he is blocking Eastwood's way up a staircase, but Clint just tosses him tumbling down the stairs!

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Dracula  (1968)  -  7/10

dracula-68-6_i-am-dracula.jpg?w=700

British TV version of Bram Stoker's tale, adapted by Charles Graham for the series Mystery and Imagination. Denholm Elliott stars as Count Dracula, a recent emigre from Transylvania who is also an ancient undead vampire. As he begins preying on the innocent young Lucy Weston (Susan George), her beloved Dr. Seward (James Maxwell) and his mentor Professor Van Helsing (Bernard Archard) race to thwart the supernatural menace. With Suzanne Neve as Mina Harker, Corin Redgrave as Jonathan Harker, and Joan Hickson as Ms. Weston. Graham condenses a lot of stuff for this 75 minute version, including jettisoning the characters of Arthur Holmwood, Quincy Morris, and Renfield. In a unique move, Harker is made into the Renfield-type, a gibbering lunatic confined to an asylum, while Seward is elevated to chief protagonist. Elliott isn't bad as the Count, and he gets a good lengthy monologue. The blood-drinking scenes are highly sexualized, to a surprising degree given that this was for television.

Source: YouTube

It's not DENHOLM ELLIOT'S fault that he was later on SO GOOD at playing prattling, doddering, kindly old Brits in stuff like LAST CRUSADE and A ROOM WITH A VIEW that it makes it kind of hard to buy him in a role like this, even though he's up to the challenge.

(he got lost in his own museum once.)

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THIS IS UNUSUAL FOR ME, but I rewatched THE UNINVITED (1944) this morning...

(something about windswept, black and white films with scenes of the ocean crashing on rocks is highly soothing to me.)

The debt it owes to REBECCA stood out even more this time, but i still like it.

IT IS SUCH A WELL-SHOT FILM!

I even went and looked up the SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE radio version on youtube and came across this:

which I have to say, and no offense to anyone, contains a baffling but firm assertion by the late ROBERT OSBORNE that (to paraphrase) he doesn't see any sort of Lesbian connotation with the CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER character AT ALL and thinks anyone who does is "REALLY REACHING."

 

I miss and respect MR OSBORNE, but this got such a "HON-EY!" from me...I mean, gurl c'mon, the character could not be any more of a lesbian if she delivered her intense monologues about her unending love for the dead perfect woman while taking apart and cleaning a transmission on her kitchen table as TWO CATS  aggressively groom one another in the background.

there. i said it.

i know i sometimes offend some of you by seeing GAYNESS IN CLASSIC FILMS WHERE IT'S DEBATABLE, but when it comes to THE UNINVITED and the character of the overly attached holistic healer/ MRS DANVERS retread played by the aforementioned MRS SKINNER, there IS NO AMBIGUITY ABOUT IT, IT'S RIGHT THERE IN THE OPEN and you don't need to be CAMILLE LEPAGLIA to discern it either.

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"Susan and God" - George Cukor - 1940 -

starring Joan Crawford and Fredric March -

according to the credits, the screenplay by Anita Loos is based on the celebrated play by Rachel Crothers -

if this play was the state of the American theatre at the time, the theatre must have been in dire straits -

as for the film, Susan (Crawford), a wealthy nitwit, returns home from Europe with a new understanding of God -

it involves being brutally honest about other people, and telling them to shape up or ship out -

how anyone could interpret this as anything other than embracing one's darkest impulses is beyond me -

Susan sees it as a harmonious relationship with God -

meanwhile her own life is falling apart -

she is estranged from her husband, a drunk and her daugher, a lonely wallflower -

she tries to embrace her advice and make amends -

but her view of herself as God's messenger gets in the way -

but somehow she is granted God's grace -

and is re-united with the only people who will make her life meaningful -

Crawford, who is the most deluded of women, gives a knockout performance -

it could not have been easy -

   40susan11may1.jpg

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On 8/4/2019 at 9:42 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

uninvited+10.pngI watched THE UNINVITED (1944) last night as part of RUTH HUSSEY'S SUTS DAY.

When i was a teenager in the 1990's I really really got into classic movies as a lot of them were finally being rolled out on VHS and burgeoning cable tv stations...yet, as i recall it, this film was unavailable for a while, but I did find a copy of the book on which it was based and I found it a little bit of a letdown, a feeling that I can't help but shift to the film which, lovely and gorgeous and stylish as it is (the black and white cinematography was nominated for an Oscar but lost to LAURA)- and as much as it is able to get away with (murder, adultery, the intriguing rehash of the MRS DANVERS character from REBECCA as an EVEN MORE AGGRESSIVE U-HAUL LESBIAN with a dash of Holistic Bull**** thrown in for funsies)- I feel as if opportunities were missed...and yet, I know there was only so much one could do with such a story in the HAYES CODE ERA OF 1944 (the relationship between brother and sister seems ripe for a subtext that is not even hinted at)

This is set in England but everyone, even the British actors like RAY MILLAND and DONALD CRISP- sound vaguely American, I guess this was to make it easier for newcomer GAIL RUSSELL to not have to put on an accent in what was her first substantial role in a big film with big stars.

this is awful, but the TRAGIC STORY OF GAIL RUSSELL adds something to this movie; as does the score and- of course- STELLA BY STARLIGHT.

It's a good movie, even if tame by today's standards.

I got a little annoyed by the scene wherein Hussey and Milland walk into the especially haunted studio room and proclaim to to be "the ugliest room in the house", maybe even the ugliest they've ever seen...

um:

The+Uninvited+204115.jpg

No.

You could charge $4500/mo for this thing in Brooklyn, and that's taking into account the waves are just a rear projection effect.

The book was much better. I hated all the dumb jokes they made Milland say throughout the film as if they were trying to make it a comedy. Still cant get over viewers chose RUTH HUSSEY over Ruth Roman. What a waste of a SUTS DAY!

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4 hours ago, rayban said:

"Susan and God" - George Cukor - 1940 -

starring Joan Crawford and Fredric March -

according to the credits, the screenplay by Anita Loos is based on the celebrated play by Rachel Crothers -

if this play was the state of the American theatre at the time, the theatre must have been in dire straits -

as for the film, Susan (Crawford), a wealthy nitwit, returns home from Europe with a new understanding of God -

it involves being brutally honest about other people, and telling them to shape up or ship out -

how anyone could interpret this as anything other than embracing one's darkest impulses is beyond me -

Susan sees it as a harmonious relationship with God -

meanwhile her own life is falling apart -

she is estranged from her husband, a drunk and her daugher, a lonely wallflower -

she tries to embrace her advice and make amends -

but her view of herself as God's messenger gets in the way -

but somehow she is granted God's grace -

and is re-united with the only people who will make her life meaningful -

Crawford, who is the most deluded of women, gives a knockout performance -

it could not have been easy -

   40susan11may1.jpg

I think Gertrude Lawrence played it on stage, that could explain something...I think Roz Russell would've been a better choice.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THIS IS UNUSUAL FOR ME, but I rewatched THE UNINVITED (1944) this morning...

(something about windswept, black and white films with scenes of the ocean crashing on rocks is highly soothing to me.)

The debt it owes to REBECCA stood out even more this time, but i still like it.

IT IS SUCH A WELL-SHOT FILM!

I even went and looked up the SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE radio version on youtube and came across this:

which I have to say, and no offense to anyone, contains a baffling but firm assertion by the late ROBERT OSBORNE that (to paraphrase) he doesn't see any sort of Lesbian connotation with the CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER character AT ALL and thinks anyone who does is "REALLY REACHING."

  Reveal hidden contents

I miss and respect MR OSBORNE, but this got such a "HON-EY!" from me...I mean, gurl c'mon, the character could not be any more of a lesbian if she delivered her intense monologues about her unending love for the dead perfect woman while taking apart and cleaning a transmission on her kitchen table as TWO CATS  aggressively groom one another in the background.

there. i said it.

i know i sometimes offend some of you by seeing GAYNESS IN CLASSIC FILMS WHERE IT'S DEBATABLE, but when it comes to THE UNINVITED and the character of the overly attached holistic healer/ MRS DANVERS retread played by the aforementioned MRS SKINNER, there IS NO AMBIGUITY ABOUT IT, IT'S RIGHT THERE IN THE OPEN and you don't need to be CAMILLE LEPAGLIA to discern it either.

WTH??????

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23 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Her marriage to JOHN AGAR was apparently as dark as the bleakest noir there was....i think it maybe even had something to do with her stepping away from acting...although she did do some TV in the 50's i think.

See?  And just think what she could have brought to the table after THAT! 

Sepiatone

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The Last Days of Dolwyn  (1949)  -  7/10

dolwyn.png

Amusing British light drama written and directed by Emlyn Williams. He also stars as Rob, a snobbish representative of Lord Lancashire (Allan Aynesworth), tasked with informing the inhabitants of the small Welsh village of Dolwyn that the entire valley in which the village is located will be flooded as part of the Lord's waterworks project. Rob runs into trouble when the kindly Merri (Edith Evans) discovers that she owns her lot of land outright, meaning she cannot be evicted by Lancashire. Also featuring Richard Burton in his film debut, Anthony James, Barbara Couper, Andrea Lea, and Hugh Griffith. I thought this was a charming little film, with a fun performance by Evans. Burton looks impossibly young, and along with Couper provides the film's romantic sub-plot. Also released as Woman of Dolwyn.

Source: internet

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THIS IS UNUSUAL FOR ME, but I rewatched THE UNINVITED (1944) this morning...

(something about windswept, black and white films with scenes of the ocean crashing on rocks is highly soothing to me.)

The debt it owes to REBECCA stood out even more this time, but i still like it.

IT IS SUCH A WELL-SHOT FILM!

I'm glad you enjoyed this film so much.  I DVR'd this film because I'd never seen it before.  It's one of those films that I always see during the Criterion sale and I'd always wanted to see it.  It doesn't seem to air very often on TCM.  Perhaps I'll be able to watch this film tonight! 

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

The book was much better. I hated all the dumb jokes they made Milland say throughout the film as if they were trying to make it a comedy. Still cant get over viewers chose RUTH HUSSEY over Ruth Roman. What a waste of a SUTS DAY!

I only recorded The Uninvited.  I'm guessing Hussey was chosen over Roman because she has some more well-known and familiar films on her resume.  I was rooting for Roman too, because she had more films that I hadn't seen.  Oh well, people like to vote for what is familiar. 

I thought I'd recorded more of Hussey's films, but apparently that was for today--Melvyn Douglas day. I recorded There's That Woman Again and Mary Burns, Fugitive. 

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I even went and looked up the SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE radio version on youtube and came across this:

which I have to say, and no offense to anyone, contains a baffling but firm assertion by the late ROBERT OSBORNE that (to paraphrase) he doesn't see any sort of Lesbian connotation with the CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER character AT ALL and thinks anyone who does is "REALLY REACHING."

  Reveal hidden contents

I miss and respect MR OSBORNE, but this got such a "HON-EY!" from me...I mean, gurl c'mon, the character could not be any more of a lesbian if she delivered her intense monologues about her unending love for the dead perfect woman while taking apart and cleaning a transmission on her kitchen table as TWO CATS  aggressively groom one another in the background.

there. i said it.

i know i sometimes offend some of you by seeing GAYNESS IN CLASSIC FILMS WHERE IT'S DEBATABLE, but when it comes to THE UNINVITED and the character of the overly attached holistic healer/ MRS DANVERS retread played by the aforementioned MRS SKINNER, there IS NO AMBIGUITY ABOUT IT, IT'S RIGHT THERE IN THE OPEN and you don't need to be CAMILLE LEPAGLIA to discern it either.

I believe that people with different experiences will have significantly different views of what is stereotypical behaviour in regards to sexual orientation. A person who is long immersed in a Bohemian lifestyle might become blind to all indications and connotations which are not directly related to that segment of the population whom they wish to trip and fall on top of. This is a form of 'inattentional blindness' in that they focus only on those they desire at first glance and all others become invisible. Such selective attention is perhaps best demonstrated in: http://www.theinvisiblegorilla.com/gorilla_experiment.html but it applies in many forms on many levels for many traits.

I am personally so innocent and naive that I believe this is what your reference to cats in the background must indicate:

ewmSgdg.gif

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Le Silence de la mer  (1949)  -  8/10

220px-Silencedelamer.jpg

French WWII drama from director Jean-Pierre Melville, based on the book by Vercors. In Occupied France circa 1941, a German officer (Howard Vernon) is assigned to take residence in the house of an old Frenchman (Jean-Marie Robain) and his niece (Nicole Stephane). The French duo resent this imposition, but are no position to do anything about it, so they decide to ignore the German's presence, never speaking to him, and rarely acknowledging his existence. The German thinks himself a decent person, and tries repeatedly to connect to the French duo, going so far as to immerse himself in French culture in hopes of finding common ground. However, the result is that the officer begins to question he and his country's position in the Occupation.

This was Melville's first feature film, and it's a near masterpiece of low budget filmmaking, with very good cinematography and excellent use of limited location shooting, and matching stock footage with newly created scenes. Vernon, with his unusual face, is very effective as the conflicted Nazi. He would go on to notoriety in the exploitation films of Jess Franco in the 60's and 70's. Recommended.

Source: The Criterion Channel

20645_le-silence-de-la-mer-08.jpg

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