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I Just Watched...

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What a Carve Up!  (1961)  -  6/10

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British comedy with Kenneth Connor as Ernie Broughton, who receives news that his uncle has died, and that Ernie must travel to the remote family estate in the Yorkshire moors for the reading of the will. Ernie brings along his pal Syd (Sidney James), and the two get tangled up in murders and more in the "old dark house". With Donald Pleasence, Shirley Eaton, Dennis Price, Michael Gough, Esma Cannon, Michael Gwynn, and Valerie Taylor. Old-fashioned comedy that makes for a passably enjoyable diversion.

Source: internet

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On 8/10/2019 at 3:27 PM, LawrenceA said:

La Pointe Courte  (1955)  -  3/10

La-Pointe-Courte.jpg

French drama from director Agnes Varda. Lui (Philippe Noiret) and Elle (Silvia Monfort) are a couple, but things are strained. They wander about and engage in inane conversation. Then they stare at things. Meanwhile, the poor residents of La Pointe-Courte struggle to survive and conduct their daily lives. This is the kind of pretentious, tedious garbage that gives foreign and arthouse films a bad name to the general viewing public. The kind of excruciating experience that makes one hate cinema in general. Plus it's in French.

Source: The Criterion Channel

A fat, promiscuous woman with a dozen kids. A buxom 16-year-old jeune fille gets a boyfriend and they're gonna get married. Un homme gets caught fishing in the wrong place and is en prison but gets off for the weekend so he can return to Le Village to win the Sunday Joost. And if you like les chats, you're in Heaven (dans le ciel), man. Hey, what's there not to like? :lol:

I DID like it. Assez bien.  I just can't think it so bad as all that, at any rate. Pas du tout.

At least it didn't have spaceships, Godzillas, incredible hulks, les grands bougres, bloodsuckers, etc. in it. It might have been more appealing to some ;) . Garbage comes in many forms.

I laughed at the images of the crawling crab and the water-wafted dead cat just as la femme is lamenting a failing mariage. The dialogue between them is Villagespeak. They have to block nasal passages with the back of their noses to avoid smelling bacterial fish, les poissons mauvaises. This is results in short, inane, phrases so they can breathe. Vous voyez, there's a reason for everything.

Of course, it would have been better in Portuguese.   

///

 

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I watched a really damn strange movie that I had never heard of last night. 

SHADOW ON THE WALL (1950) A stunningly dark film from MGM which actually reminded me of an episode of the modern dystopian anthology series “black mirror”

It really doesn’t pull any punches in dealing with adultery or murder or the endangering of children, and it was rather thoughtfully directed even though it obviously wasn’t an “A” picture for MGM.

Zachary Scott, looking more adorable than he ever has and wearing a sleeveless T-shirt in a couple of scenes, plays a very nice guy who is married to a woman who is cheating on him. He confronts her, and she knocks him out with a silver hand mirror. While he is unconscious she calls her sister, ANN SOTHERN to help. Turns out the guy she’s seeing on the side is and his fiancé. And Maisie herself, plugs her.

"Sister, sister, never were there such devoted sisters..."

Zachary’s daughter from a previous marriage witnesses the whole ordeal but buries it in her subconscious. She is then taken to a foster children’s ward where Nancy Davis nee Reagan plays a psychologist who takes an interest in her. Meanwhile Ann worries that the little girl will finger her for the killing, for which Zachary finds himself on death row, and – I kid you not – tries to kill the little girl.

It’s a dark, heavy film that takes a pretty strong look at psychology. Not quite sure why it hasn’t been mentioned with many of the other psychological noirs of the postwar era. Also bears a passing resemblance to THE BLUE GARDENIA,  With which it would make an intriguing double bill.

The film ends up becoming Nancy’s, which is kind of a surprise, but she manages to put forth a competent performance – although I would’ve liked to have seen a better actress in the part. Zachary Scott – who was on loan from Warner Bros. disappears for an extremely large chunk of the film after being a major player in the first third. And Sothern is very good, in spite of the strange casting, it was funny how much she looked and sounded like Gloria Grahame in the part

GIGI PERREAU Who I knew as Sarah Fina from “Girls Town”, is very good as the young child who witnesses the murder.

NOTE- Against my better judgment I posted this review using the voice transcription on my phone and it literally heard every third word I said wrong. I’ve got to get going to work and don’t have time to correct it, so*IF* part of this *DOESN'T* make sense my bad.

EDIT- ARRRGH.

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44 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

so a part of this don’t make sense my bad.

That was the only unintelligible sentence. 

45 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

she calls her sister, and southern to help

I got a good laugh over that one though, once I figured it out.

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"Walking On Air" - Joseph Santley - 1937 -

starring Gene Raymond and Ann Sothern and Henry Stephensen and Jessie Ralph -

this film feels like an adaptation of a Broadway musical without most of the music -

but it is totally airy and extremely stylish -

a rich girl, whose father disapproves of her boyfriend, whom she wants to marry -

hires an out-of-work singer to impersonate a French count who wants to marry her -

this French count is very obnovious -

in that way, she hopes to win her father's approval of her original choice -

Gene Raymond and Ann Southern float through this concoction with the greatest of ease -

they bring grace, beauty and charm to the proceedings -

and, guess what?, they sing, too -

spoiler alert -

the girl's plans go haywire -

she falls in love with the bogus French count -

and gets to marry him, too -

walking-on-air-ann-sothern-gene-raymond-

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched a really damn strange movie that I had never heard of last night. 

SHADOW ON THE WALL (1950) A stunningly dark film from MGM which actually reminded me of an episode of the modern dystopian anthology series “black mirror”

It really doesn’t pull any punches in dealing with adultery or murder or the endangering of children, and it was rather thoughtfully directed even though it obviously wasn’t an “A” picture for MGM.

Zachary Scott, looking more adorable than he ever has and wearing a sleeveless T-shirt in a couple of scenes, plays a very nice guy who is married to a woman who is cheating on him. He confronts her, and she knocks him out with a silver hand mirror. While he is unconscious she calls her sister, ANN SOTHERN to help. Turns out the guy she’s seeing on the side is and his fiancé. And Maisie herself, plugs her.

"Sister, sister, never were there such devoted sisters..."

Zachary’s daughter from a previous marriage witnesses the whole ordeal but buries it in her subconscious. She is then taken to a foster children’s ward where Nancy Davis nee Reagan plays a psychologist who takes an interest in her. Meanwhile Ann worries that the little girl will finger her for the killing, for which Zachary finds himself on death row, and – I kid you not – tries to kill the little girl.

It’s a dark, heavy film that takes a pretty strong look at psychology. Not quite sure why it hasn’t been mentioned with many of the other psychological noirs of the postwar era. Also bears a passing resemblance to THE BLUE GARDENIA,  With which it would make an intriguing double bill.

The film ends up becoming Nancy’s, which is kind of a surprise, but she manages to put forth a competent performance – although I would’ve liked to have seen a better actress in the part. Zachary Scott – who was on loan from Warner Bros. disappears for an extremely large chunk of the film after being a major player in the first third. And Sothern is very good, in spite of the strange casting, it was funny how much she looked and sounded like Gloria Grahame in the part

GIGI PERREAU Who I knew as Sarah Fina from “Girls Town”, is very good as the young child who witnesses the murder.

*NOTE- Against my better judgment I posted this review using the voice transcription on my phone and it literally heard every third word I said wrong. I’ve got to get going to work and don’t have time to correct it, so*IF* part of this *DOESN'T* make sense my bad.

EDIT- ARRRGH.

* Lorna, everything I do I do on the mic.

The only thing you have to remember is that it's not a real microphone-- it's more like a computer.

Sometimes it comes up with such weird stuff-- top of the Mind-- that you can't even remember what it was you said. But it usually will give you your correct word choice if you click on the word.

But it's such a convenience, and I always proof anyway, so that I simply love it!

BTW-- It's top of the mind, so its first choice is often something vulgar. LOL

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ADDITION, A PIC OF ZACHARY SCOTT IN HIS KINDA GIRLY BUT AT THE SAME TIME KINDA SEXY WIFE BEATER WITH BRA STRAPS:

tumblr_ob2p80oSMU1uwp6gyo1_1280.jpg

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched a really damn strange movie that I had never heard of last night. 

SHADOW ON THE WALL (1950) A stunningly dark film from MGM which actually reminded me of an episode of the modern dystopian anthology series “black mirror”

It really doesn’t pull any punches in dealing with adultery or murder or the endangering of children, and it was rather thoughtfully directed even though it obviously wasn’t an “A” picture for MGM.

Zachary Scott, looking more adorable than he ever has and wearing a sleeveless T-shirt in a couple of scenes, plays a very nice guy who is married to a woman who is cheating on him. He confronts her, and she knocks him out with a silver hand mirror. While he is unconscious she calls her sister, ANN SOTHERN to help. Turns out the guy she’s seeing on the side is and his fiancé. And Maisie herself, plugs her.

"Sister, sister, never were there such devoted sisters..."

Zachary’s daughter from a previous marriage witnesses the whole ordeal but buries it in her subconscious. She is then taken to a foster children’s ward where Nancy Davis nee Reagan plays a psychologist who takes an interest in her. Meanwhile Ann worries that the little girl will finger her for the killing, for which Zachary finds himself on death row, and – I kid you not – tries to kill the little girl.

It’s a dark, heavy film that takes a pretty strong look at psychology. Not quite sure why it hasn’t been mentioned with many of the other psychological noirs of the postwar era. Also bears a passing resemblance to THE BLUE GARDENIA,  With which it would make an intriguing double bill.

The film ends up becoming Nancy’s, which is kind of a surprise, but she manages to put forth a competent performance – although I would’ve liked to have seen a better actress in the part. Zachary Scott – who was on loan from Warner Bros. disappears for an extremely large chunk of the film after being a major player in the first third. And Sothern is very good, in spite of the strange casting, it was funny how much she looked and sounded like Gloria Grahame in the part

GIGI PERREAU Who I knew as Sarah Fina from “Girls Town”, is very good as the young child who witnesses the murder.

NOTE- Against my better judgment I posted this review using the voice transcription on my phone and it literally heard every third word I said wrong. I’ve got to get going to work and don’t have time to correct it, so*IF* part of this *DOESN'T* make sense my bad.

EDIT- ARRRGH.

Ooh I recorded this film when it was on Noir Alley.  This sounds like something I should watch.  I like Zachary Scott and Ann Sothern too. I only know Gigi Perreau from an episode of The Brady Bunch.  She plays Greg's math teacher whom Greg crushes on, causing his grade to go down as a result.

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10 hours ago, laffite said:

I DID like it.

Yeah, I rather assumed you would. ;):lol:

That movie could have used a Godzilla or two, maybe a few Draculas, and possibly, if not incredible, a slightly remarkable hulk.

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Cash on Demand  (1962)  -  6/10

dGTrf5sZ0izqTZTKBLFZ419eBxt.jpg

British thriller from Hammer Films, with Peter Cushing as a stuffy bank manager threatened by smooth-talking crook Andre Morell into assisting a robbery on Christmas Eve. With Richard Vernon, Norman Bird, and Kevin Stone. This tightly paced, 80-minute crime drama features good central performances that help propel the somewhat overly familiar scenario.

Source: internet

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Cash on Demand  (1962)  -  6/10

dGTrf5sZ0izqTZTKBLFZ419eBxt.jpg

British thriller from Hammer Films, with Peter Cushing as a stuffy bank manager threatened by smooth-talking crook Andre Morell into assisting a robbery on Christmas Eve. With Richard Vernon, Norman Bird, and Kevin Stone. This tightly paced, 80-minute crime drama features good central performances that help propel the somewhat overly familiar scenario.

Source: internet

Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson reunited!

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Sodom and Gomorrah  (1962)  -  5/10

220px-Sodom_and_Gomorra_(1962).jpg

Biblical epic from director Robert Aldrich, with Stewart Granger as the heroic Lot, nephew of Abraham, who leads his people to settle in the valley near the title cities, which are ruled by the cruel Queen (Anouk Aimee). Lot and his people battle for their survival against wicked forces and conspiring foes, before finally facing biblical judgment. With Pier Angeli as Lot's wife, Stanley Baker as the villainous Astaroth, Rossana Podesta, Rik Battaglia, Giacomo Rossi Stuart, Anthony Steffen, Gabriele Tinti, Claudia Mori, and Feodor Chaliapin Jr. Taking very generous liberties with the biblical text, this ends up as a lackluster costume drama with some big battle scenes (directed by Sergio Leone). The production design is pretty good, thanks to the efforts of Ken Adam, and the score by Miklos Rozsa is effective.

Source: internet

280a0d1e1e0558b6a89c368acb1bb105.jpg (704Ã480)

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Ooh I recorded this film when it was on Noir Alley.  This sounds like something I should watch.  I like Zachary Scott and Ann Sothern too. I only know Gigi Perreau from an episode of The Brady Bunch.  She plays Greg's math teacher whom Greg crushes on, causing his grade to go down as a result.

i wiki'd her because her performance in the film is really good, and i recognized the name from having seen the MST version of GIRL'S TOWN which she did as a teenager. SHADOW ON THE WALL was a flop and lost MGM a lot of money (according to wiki) which surprises me because it didn't strike me as being rather high budget. GIGI was likely thought of as a rival to NATALIE WOOD, but when this didn't do well...i think it likely did in the career of ZACHARY SCOTT as well, as i don't recall him in many 50's releases.

REALLY, SHADOW ON THE WALL did not seem like an MGM film of the early fifties AT ALL.

I daresay it's even more raw AND ENVELOPE-PUSHING than THE ASPHALT JUNGLE from the same year

EDIT- there is a long scene where two children argue over which one can/gets to drink a glass of chocolate milk that ANN "MAISIE" SOTHERN HAS POISONED, and it's GREAT!

Adorable kids too.

 

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5 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

* Lorna, everything I do I do on the mic.

The only thing you have to remember is that it's not a real microphone-- it's more like a computer.

Sometimes it comes up with such weird stuff-- top of the Mind-- that you can't even remember what it was you said. But it usually will give you your correct word choice if you click on the word.

But it's such a convenience, and I always proof anyway, so that I simply love it!

BTW-- It's top of the mind, so its first choice is often something vulgar. LOL

THAT WOULD MAKE A GREAT LINE IN SOMETHING!

When I type, I type like BARBARA STANWYCK in MEET JOHN DOE, only I don't have to push the ream in. I mean I TYPE FAAAAAAAAAAAAAST and I like to have control over the speed with which I spew forth me opinions/thoughts/etc.

the phone can't keep up with me and it does not possess my vocabulary ALTHOUGH IT IS GETTING A LOT BETTER! We're having a kind of HENRY HIGGINS/ELIZA DOOLITTLE thing where it's caught on to some of me terms and phrases.

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Being a nerd/geek at heart, I am curious about speech-to-text. Being dyslexic (sorta), I type at a rapid 26 wpm. With my tablet, I type with one finger. Predictive text rules, but does think on its own, making proof reading critical.

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The Day of the Locust (1975) --- 10/10

Source: Amazon Video ($2.99 SD streaming rental)

Simply astonishing. It's amazing to think that this film only had mixed reviews in 1975, because it is in a league of its own. A bold cautionary tale, its thrillingly cinematic, the period detail is ideal, William Atherson, Karen Black, Donald Sutherland, and Burgess Meredith are excellent, the cinematography is rich, the writing on point and hypnotic, the directing ideal. And then there is the truly gonzo ending, one of the most terrifying sequences put to film. A must-see and a knockout.

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Just now, Hibi said:

Still awaiting it's TCM debut....

It's amazing that it has not shown up on TCM because it would fit in quite well. Admittedly it would have to be shown late at night because of the sheer terror of the ending, but it should have been on the channel long before now.

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You'd think. But it's Paramount......

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Just now, Hibi said:

You'd think. But it's Paramount......

True, but I think TCM's relationship with Paramount might be on the mend or at least on the upswing. Marathon Man, Star Trek II, Children of a Lesser God, That kind of Woman, and Summer and Smokle have all recently returned after gaps of over 10 years.

That being said though, I'm on a bit of a spree trying to find Paramount titles to watch. Maybe its their lack of airing that draws me to them, but I'm determined to find more of their titles to view, and I've culled some really good films from them recently (this, I'm Dancing as Fast As I Can, Testament, Funeral in Berlin, hot Spell, Career, The Plainsman....)

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On 8/7/2019 at 12:26 PM, LawrenceA said:

Casque d'Or  (1952)  -  7/10

casque.jpg

French romance/crime drama, based on actual events, from director Jacques Becker. Simone Signoret stars as Marie, a Parisian prostitute and gangster's moll in the Belle Epoque era. When she begins an affair with a recently paroled carpenter (Serge Reggiani), it sets in motion an escalating series of violent encounters that end in scandal and tragedy. Also featuring Claude Dauphin, Raymond Bussieres, Odette Barencey, and Gaston Modot. Signoret has one of her best roles here, and she doesn't disappoint. The film's last act is a stand out. I enjoyed seeing Gaston Modot again, 22 years after starring in Luis Bunuel's L'Age d'Or.

Source: The Criterion Channel

I was not particularly taken with her. So many of her scenes were no more than a smiling face (though her face is very nice). She's is alluring in the main but her character left me a little cold. Perhaps it should have been written better (though I have a secret fear that it might not have helped). I'm not overly familiar with her movies and may not have learned to appreciate her fully. The story is lukewarm. The plot seems to hinge on Leca's plan to frame Raymond for the murder and then counting on Manda to confess to save his friend. This way he can have Marie. Oooh-kay, but it's not likely for an ex-con to do that. They are not usually martyrs. Serge Reggiani was a hit with that that intensely grave facial expression. He has good presence and seems a fine actor. I liked him a lot in Le Doulus

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Katarsis  (1963)  -  4/10

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Italian horror fantasy about a group of debauched, drunken jerks who break into a castle, where they meet the devil (Christopher Lee) who torments them with illusions. With George Ardisson, Bella Cortez, Ulderico Sciaretta, Lilli Parker, Anita Cacciolati, Mario Zakarti, and Piero Vida. This starts out like some sort of spy thriller or crime picture, with gunmen traveling from Beirut to Argentina to try and assassinate a guy. This plotline went on long enough for me to check and make sure I was watching the right movie. When it finally does move on to the castle/devil part of the tale (told in flashback), it gets much sillier and entertaining. 

Source: YouTube, an Italian-language copy with English subtitles on top of French subtitles.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

The Day of the Locust (1975) --- 10/10

Source: Amazon Video ($2.99 SD streaming rental)

Simply astonishing. It's amazing to think that this film only had mixed reviews in 1975, because it is in a league of its own. A bold cautionary tale, its thrillingly cinematic, the period detail is ideal, William Atherson, Karen Black, Donald Sutherland, and Burgess Meredith are excellent, the cinematography is rich, the writing on point and hypnotic, the directing ideal. And then there is the truly gonzo ending, one of the most terrifying sequences put to film. A must-see and a knockout.

The mixed reviews were mostly over the ending, where, in the book, our hero sees the rioting underclass as the "locusts" of his painting, that will sooner or later rise up and destroy the modern Sodom & Gomorrah--In the movie, he actually sees the rioters with masks of the characters from his painting, which, although it saves a lot of literary prose, critics thought was a bit words-of-one-syllable interpretation.

Still, Burgess Meredith deserved his Oscar nomination as the old vaudevillian.  👍  The mid-70's had a cottage industry for soft-focus period-nostalgic 30's-Hollywood pictures, and this one always gets neglected.

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Diamonds of the Night  (1964)  -  4/10

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Czech WWII drama directed by Jan Nemec about two young men who escape from a prisoner transport train on their way to a concentration camp. They try to survive in the dense woods, but the unforgiving terrain forces them back to civilization. I started out enjoying this film. It's lack of dialogue (very little is spoken for much of the runtime), handheld camerawork, and harsh locations were innovative and compelling. However, as the film progressed I grew tired of the lack of narrative and the tedious experimental-film-style digressions, in the form of quick jumps for a few seconds, to what I am assuming were supposed to be the random thoughts and memories of one or both protagonists. By the film's third act, wherein a large band of elderly and doddering German citizens awkwardly chase the duo through the forest, the whole thing had fallen apart for me, and became laughable and pretentious. As usual, many or most will disagree with me, as this is another critically acclaimed "masterpiece" that I failed to connect with and/or fully comprehend. It's only 67 minutes long.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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