speedracer5

I Just Watched...

21,428 posts in this topic

9 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

True, but I think TCM's relationship with Paramount might be on the mend or at least on the upswing. Marathon Man, Star Trek II, Children of a Lesser God, That kind of Woman, and Summer and Smokle have all recently returned after gaps of over 10 years.

That being said though, I'm on a bit of a spree trying to find Paramount titles to watch. Maybe its their lack of airing that draws me to them, but I'm determined to find more of their titles to view, and I've culled some really good films from them recently (this, I'm Dancing as Fast As I Can, Testament, Funeral in Berlin, hot Spell, Career, The Plainsman....)

A lot of 70's-80's catalog movies Paramount sold to Warner in the late 00's after they "lost interest" in vintage back-catalog DVD sale, and Warner...well, three guesses what Warner did with them in the 10's.

That left a lot of 70's-80's titles, like "Clue", "The Untouchables", "The Conversation", "Patriot Games", the '74 "Murder on the Orient Express", etc., joining the same Orphanage that the MGM/UA and some of the Columbia titles have been floating around, selling matches and wilted flowers on street corners.  That semi-PD status apparently now makes them fair game for anyone to show, including TCM.  (They've already been turning up at third-party disk labels, like Criterion.)

Viacom now also owns free-with-ads broadcast-streaming site PlutoTV, and--in addition to 24/7 channels for their MTV, Nick and Comedy Central reruns, and a 24/7 Dora the Explorer channel to plug the movie 😮--they've also added a free-with-ads "Paramount Classic Channel", which has been showing quite a variety lately, from the Elvis musicals to the Jerry Lewis comedies, and a few of the wartime-Pacific Cary Grant comedies in between.

49 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Avengers: Endgame  (2019)  -  no comment

(Not even a, y'know....little one?  😕  Or are we also supposed to roll our eyes painedly and cry o-tempora-o-mores at the very sight of Mark Ruffalo in CGI, even though they got the character right from the current comics?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1991's THE FISHER KING - a perfectly directed movie whose central theme is that we are all connected starring Jeff Bridges, Robin Williams, Mercedes Ruehl, Amanda Plummer & Micheal Jeter.

The_Fisher_King_Poster.jpg

The performances of all principles are truly outstanding and charming with the most perfect dialogue in a movie EVER. This viewing was prompted by my missing Michael Jeter-this is one of his best performances- and was reminded just how much I loved Mercedes Ruehl in this too. Solid support all around.

This was one of Terry Gilliam's earlier films where he didn't write the screenplay, and the movie is better for it. Gilliam concentrates on telling the story in his own unique way, most notably his personification of psychosis as The Red Knight, an image only Robin Williams (as character Perry) can see. The incredible costume, lighting, fireballs and slow motion for the Red Knight is reminiscent of the imagery in NIGHT/CURSE OF THE DEMON.

red-knight.jpg

Gilliam's work shines in the luminous, thoughtful often dazzling cinematography bringing you into this world of contrasts between life's love/beauty coldness/ugliness and seriousness/absurdity:

03.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

I watch this periodically just to remind me what great filmmaking & acting looks like. If you haven't seen this, I highly recommend it!

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't seen The Fisher King in years but will now have to revisit it.

Working near Grand Central, I think the dance sequence filmed there is one of the most wonderful things I've seen in terms of using a landmark in film.

I read the story that hundreds of dancers were recruited from dance schools;  filming time in Grand Central was very limited:  only one night.

Turns out, most of the dancers couldn't waltz, so choreographers had to give impromptu lessons, cutting into the schedule.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

1991's THE FISHER KING - a perfectly directed movie whose central theme is that we are all connected starring Jeff Bridges, Robin Williams, Mercedes Ruehl, Amanda Plummer & Micheal Jeter. 

The_Fisher_King_Poster.jpg

The performances of all principles are truly outstanding and charming with the most perfect dialogue in a movie EVER. This viewing was prompted by my missing Michael Jeter-this is one of his best performances- and was reminded just how much I loved Mercedes Ruehl in this too. Solid support all around.

This was one of Terry Gilliam's earlier films where he didn't write the screenplay, and the movie is better for it. Gilliam concentrates on telling the story in his own unique way, most notably his personification of psychosis as The Red Knight, an image only Robin Williams (as character Perry) can see. The incredible costume, lighting, fireballs and slow motion for the Red Knight is reminiscent of the imagery in NIGHT/CURSE OF THE DEMON.

red-knight.jpg

Gilliam's work shines in the luminous, thoughtful often dazzling cinematography bringing you into this world of contrasts between life's love/beauty coldness/ugliness and seriousness/absurdity:

03.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

I watch this periodically just to remind me what great filmmaking & acting looks like. If you haven't seen this, I highly recommend it!

 

My heavens, what a glowing review you give this film. I am intrigued.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

The Day of the Locust (1975) --- 10/10

Source: Amazon Video ($2.99 SD streaming rental)

Simply astonishing. It's amazing to think that this film only had mixed reviews in 1975, because it is in a league of its own. A bold cautionary tale, its thrillingly cinematic, the period detail is ideal, William Atherson, Karen Black, Donald Sutherland, and Burgess Meredith are excellent, the cinematography is rich, the writing on point and hypnotic, the directing ideal. And then there is the truly gonzo ending, one of the most terrifying sequences put to film. A must-see and a knockout.

Believe or not I've never seen this one but I can check it out on Amazon Prime, thanks for the heads up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, laffite said:

My heavens, what a glowing review you give this film. I am intrigued.

I caught it in the middle once and couldn't get into it, so I really can't comment on it one way or the other. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

r4n3bS4.jpg

... (1970) is an intriguing political mini-thriller from Czechoslovakia. After attending a Party social function, a man and his wife return home to be confronted with irregularities (for instance, their home is the only one on the block without power and there are indications that it has been broken into) which they take for a possibility of being targeted by the Party for some wrong doing. It's indicated that they are probably innocent but nevertheless feel the need to purge documents that might be misconstrued if discovered. The title indicates a fear that the house is bugged. The couple bicker constantly indicating deep-rooted marital problems, and at one point the wife makes dire admissions that may be seen by some (me, for instanee) as darkly humorous, especially since they were made while resisting having her head dunked in water for drinking too much. There is a twisty, discordant occurrence at a crucial juncture. The movie has genuine Noir qualities (I think). These two married people dominate the film and curiously they seem unevenly written. The husband is relatively staid compared to his wife who maintains steady verbiage of seamless spontaneity (one wonders if they allowed her to improvise a bit) that is entertaining, largely due to what I would term a magnificent performance by an actress named Tifina Bohdalova. ///

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I caught it in the middle once and couldn't get into it, so I really can't comment on it one way or the other. 

Maybe it just had a lousy second half.

:lol:

///

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, laffite said:

r4n3bS4.jpg

... (1970) is an intriguing political mini-thriller from Czechoslovakia. After attending a Party social function, a man and his wife return home to be confronted with irregularities (for instance, their home is the only one on the block without power and there are indications that it has been broken into) which they take for a possibility of being targeted by the Party for some wrong doing. It's indicated that they are probably innocent but nevertheless feel the need to purge documents that might be misconstrued if discovered. The title indicates a fear that the house is bugged. The couple bicker constantly indicating underlying marital problems, and at one point the wife makes dire admissions that may be seen by some (me, for instanee) as darkly humorous, especially since they were made while resisting having her head dunked in water for drinking too much. There is a twisty, discordant occurrence at a crucial juncture. The movie has genuine Noir qualities (I think). These two married people dominate the film and curiously they seem unevenly written. The husband is relatively staid compared to his wife who maintains steady verbiage of seamless spontaneity (one wonders if they allowed her to improvise a bit) that is entertaining, largely due to what I would term a magnificent performance by an actress named Tifina Bohdalova. ///

Along with Welcome, No Trespassing, this is one of my favorite satirical "dissident" films of the Eastern Bloc.

MV5BZWZhMmZmZTAtODM3My00NmMwLWJjZTUtYmQw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Maybe it just had a lousy second half.

 

I think it was just before that red knight image below 

red-knight.jpg

So I didn't know what was going on looked like a typical Sword and Dragon fantasy whatever and I never bothered to check it out again. But it could be about something else entirely, it's just how first impressions strike you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EricJ said: (Not even a, y'know....little one?  😕  Or are we also supposed to roll our eyes painedly and cry o-tempora-o-mores at the very sight of Mark Ruffalo in CGI, even though they got the character right from the current comics?)

 

I posted the Hulk pic in response to someone else's comments earlier in the day. I'm aware of "Professor Hulk", as that iteration has been around since at least the 1980's.

I left no comment initially because movies of that genre are generally met with disdain and hostility around here, and I was trying to avoid getting into the usual negativity.

I enjoyed the film quite a bit, despite many clunky bits, and even a couple of outright bad ones (the "Girl Power!" moment in the big end fight was cringeworthy pandering of the worst kind). Despite already knowing what was coming, I found the ending moving and well-done. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIAN DONLEVY day was PACKED with some great titles-

I watched THE GREAT MCGINTY (1940) last night- one of the many exceptional films released in a year with a lot of exceptional films- this won the BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY OSCAR for PRESTON STURGES and it's deserved.

qsuF7YDeE4ctIBnOOmLoav9VKfd.jpg?partner=

DONLEVEY- who is dynamic, fantastic and quite sexy especially in the BANANA REPUBLIC BOOKEND scenes, costars with Muriel Angelus (that's a clickable link to her imdb page)- a subtle British actress for whom this was the final film although she lived for quite some time after. she's good and it's interesting that she doesn't bring the baggage of numerous well-known film performances or a "persona" with her, the way STANWYCK or LOMBARD or many other BIGGER NAMES would've in this part, because halfway through, we come to see that SHE is pulling a CON of her own on the unwitting con artist Protagonist.

I don't like the ending to this movie.

That's not me saying I think it's a bad ending or I could come up with a better one, I am just saying I don't like it.

AKIM TAMIROFF costars and, as always, is a delight.

boris-badenov.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

BRIAN DONLEVY day was PACKED with some great titles-

I watched THE GREAT MCGINTY (1940) last night- one of the many exceptional films released in a year with a lot of exceptional films- this won the BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY OSCAR for PRESTON STURGES and it's deserved.

qsuF7YDeE4ctIBnOOmLoav9VKfd.jpg?partner=

DONLEVEY- who is dynamic, fantastic and quite sexy especially in the BANANA REPUBLIC BOOKEND scenes, costars with Muriel Angelus (that's a clickable link to her imdb page)- a subtle British actress for whom this was the final film although she lived for quite some time after. she's good and it's interesting that she doesn't bring the baggage of numerous well-known film performances or a "persona" with her, the way STANWYCK or LOMBARD or many other BIGGER NAMES would've in this part, because halfway through, we come to see that SHE is pulling a CON of her own on the unwitting con artist Protagonist.

I don't like the ending to this movie.

That's not me saying I think it's a bad ending or I could come up with a better one, I am just saying I don't like it.

AKIM TAMIROFF costars and, as always, is a delight.

boris-badenov.jpg

We watched this last night with my 30 year old son, who is not a movie buff, and he had never seen it before.  However, he is a political junkie, and he loved it.  Despite the era in which it was made, it still speaks to politics today.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I caught it in the middle once and couldn't get into it, so I really can't comment on it one way or the other. 

Since the central theme is "we're all connected", you'd be lost without the first introduction of each character. Once they are in the story together -about halfway point- you understand their connection.

It very much reminds me of Clarence the angel saying in It's A Wonderful Life, "Then help me by letting me help you." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

1991's THE FISHER KING - a perfectly directed movie whose central theme is that we are all connected starring Jeff Bridges, Robin Williams, Mercedes Ruehl, Amanda Plummer & Micheal Jeter.

The_Fisher_King_Poster.jpg

The performances of all principles are truly outstanding and charming with the most perfect dialogue in a movie EVER. This viewing was prompted by my missing Michael Jeter-this is one of his best performances- and was reminded just how much I loved Mercedes Ruehl in this too. Solid support all around.

This was one of Terry Gilliam's earlier films where he didn't write the screenplay, and the movie is better for it. Gilliam concentrates on telling the story in his own unique way, most notably his personification of psychosis as The Red Knight, an image only Robin Williams (as character Perry) can see. The incredible costume, lighting, fireballs and slow motion for the Red Knight is reminiscent of the imagery in NIGHT/CURSE OF THE DEMON.

Gilliam's work shines in the luminous, thoughtful often dazzling cinematography bringing you into this world of contrasts between life's love/beauty coldness/ugliness and seriousness/absurdity:

 

I watch this periodically just to remind me what great filmmaking & acting looks like. If you haven't seen this, I highly recommend it!

 

I only saw it through all the way once, although I looked at some scenes when it was available of Showtime not too long ago. In a way, I am kind of scared to revisit it, because my first viewing of it was perfect. With the exception of ET (where I was a basket case for the last 40 minutes), this film gave me the strongest emotional reaction of any film I've seen, and its still a film I'm haunted by. Everyone is on the top of their game here. A few months ago, i tried to compose some of my thoughts about the film into a review, 3 years after having seen it....I'm reprinting it here.

Quote

 

I realize its strange to add a review for a film one saw in 2016. But then again, this is no ordinary film. The Fisher King is one of those films that, for me, at least hit a true nerve and went straight for the heart. Along with ET, this is one of the films I cried at the most. Perhaps, it is more poignant now then it was in 1991, since Robin Williams' tragic passing in 2014 only added another layer of poignancy to the film.

Williams is indeed fantastic in a part that balances both his manic comic side and his tender, heartbreaking dramatic one, and it is probably the best performance he ever gave. But Jeff bridges is as good, if not better, in one of the best performances of his own career. He has to manage quite an arc, going from a disreputable jerk at the beginning, through self-loathing loner, through penitant trying to make amends, to brief reversion back through heartless jerk, to becoming a decent individual through true and deep redemption. It's quite a ride, and he manages all the changes perfectly, making it feel natural and never forced; this is one of the best leading actor performances of the 90s.

Which is not to overlook the three sublime supporting performances. Mercedes Ruehl won a richly deserved Oscar as a strong, witty woman breaking inside from years of being worn down by Bridges whom she loves regardless. She balances humor and tenderness and she is always astonishing to watch, and I wish her great talent was seen in more films. Amanda Plummer, as the object of William's affection, is beautifully tender as well, so shy and insecure. The scene where Williams walks her home is a great scene, one of the most romantic and touching I've seen. And then there's Michael Jeter as the homeless singer who possibly has AIDS. He steals the show in his earlier scenes with strong humor, and then is astonishing in his final scene, a scene that still cuts like a knife in my memory as being one of the most heartbreaking scenes ever put to celluloid.

The whole film is filled with astonishing scenes and camera angles: the way the radio studio at the beginning looks like a prison cell, the unnerving red knight, the gorgeous mass waltz at Grand Central Station, the unique dinner, the harrowing flashback to William's past.... It's rare for such a film to offer so much but there you go. This is a film that is admittedly not for everyone (the reviews from 1991 show that), but for anybody willing to go along with it, it is a journey they will remember forever.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tis Liv Ullman day, and yes, i set out to see some of her lesser known English-language films, so yes, i saw Zandy's Bride, The Abdication, and, yes, Lost Horizon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Tis Liv Ullman dauy, and yes, i set out to see some of her lesser known English-language films, so yes, i saw Zandy's Bride, The Abdication, and, yes, Lost Horizon.

All very good films that I enjoy. Don't listen to the haters.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Gershwin fan said:

All very good films that I enjoy. Don't listen to the haters.

 

That's the thing, I actually liked Lost Horizon. it has this terrible reputation and yes it didn't gel with the majority of films made in the early 70s, but seeing it out of that 70s context makes things a bit easier for the film. Taken out of the context of the time, there is something appealing and likable about it and the cast handles many scenes quite well. And it always held interest.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that the music was catchy and had a nice message. I think another part of it is that the original is such an amazing classic that it pales in comparison to that. It is certainly not as good as the original but it is very fun for what it is.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rosebette said:

We watched this last night with my 30 year old son, who is not a movie buff, and he had never seen it before.  However, he is a political junkie, and he loved it.  Despite the era in which it was made, it still speaks to politics today.  

YES!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One Wonderful Sunday (1947).

Akira Kurosawa's story of two young lovers who spend their one day a week off work together in early post-war Tokyo despite only having ¥35 between them, an amount that leaves them relatively poor and unable to enjoy themselves.  The two share a series of vignettes, all ultimately involving money or the lack of it, and how not having it can grind them into nothing.

It's often considered one of Kurosawa's "lesser" movies, but there's so much more bubbling just beneath the surface.  It's also a movie that I think is easier for people who generally wouldn't think they're into foreign films to get into.

9/10.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/13/2019 at 12:42 PM, LawrenceA said:

Sodom and Gomorrah  (1962)  -  5/10

220px-Sodom_and_Gomorra_(1962).jpg

Biblical epic from director Robert Aldrich, with Stewart Granger as the heroic Lot, nephew of Abraham, who leads his people to settle in the valley near the title cities, which are ruled by the cruel Queen (Anouk Aimee). Lot and his people battle for their survival against wicked forces and conspiring foes, before finally facing biblical judgment. With Pier Angeli as Lot's wife, Stanley Baker as the villainous Astaroth, Rossana Podesta, Rik Battaglia, Giacomo Rossi Stuart, Anthony Steffen, Gabriele Tinti, Claudia Mori, and Feodor Chaliapin Jr. Taking very generous liberties with the biblical text, this ends up as a lackluster costume drama with some big battle scenes (directed by Sergio Leone). The production design is pretty good, thanks to the efforts of Ken Adam, and the score by Miklos Rozsa is effective.

Source: internet

280a0d1e1e0558b6a89c368acb1bb105.jpg (704Ã480)

What a gorgeous picture of Anouk Aimee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian Donlevy's SUTS day has come and gone.  I saw several of his films on Tuesday, some of which I had seen before (Impact, The Great McGinty, The Quatermass Xperiment).   I hadn't seen "Beau Geste" for probably 30 years until Tuesday night, and like many films of 1939, it was most enjoyable.  Donlevy got a deserved nomination for the Academy Awards with his performance as Sergeant Markoff, although I kept thinking one could get good and blitzed if you had a drinking game for every time he uttered, "I promise you"!  Robert Preston was quite a dashing fellow as one of the Geste brothers, and I was hoping when Susan Hayward was playing the piano that she'd bust out a chorus of "I'll Plant My Own Tree"...but that would have been 30 years ahead of its time and may not have had the same impact on "Valley of the Dolls" than it actually did!

I also saw "The Glass Key".  If people thought Margaret Sullavan was a super-b**** in "Cry Havoc!", her performance had nothing on William Bendix and the way he brutalized Alan Ladd.

Also, there was a scene in the early-in-the-morning broadcast of "Barbary Coast" where Donlevy is wearing a dark outfit and looks either very, very trim or borderline emaciated.  But his face looks so large in the scene that he almost looked like a bobble-head doll.  Did anyone else notice that disparity, or am I going crazy?  On second thought, don't respond to the second part of that question!  😉

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

That's the thing, I actually liked Lost Horizon. it has this terrible reputation and yes it didn't gel with the majority of films made in the early 70s, but seeing it out of that 70s context makes things a bit easier for the film. Taken out of the context of the time, there is something appealing and likable about it and the cast handles many scenes quite well. And it always held interest.

The songs are...sort of what you would picture if someone said "Burt Bacharach musical", and that always keeps me from absolutely liking it, even though I have a secret taste for 60's-70's roadshow musicals.  (Well, okay, having Bobby Van in it doesn't help much either.)

Much of the legend was around a silly extended cut from "Living Together, Growing Together" which critics guffawed about and the Medveds' Golden Turkeys drove into mythical status, but never made it to the theatrical cut, and left audiences thinking "Oh, yeah, it flopped because it was bad, pretty much."  I can't find the scene as described on the current remastered Blu-ray, although heard it was restored, and wondered whether it was another case of the Medveds' bad memory telling tall tales again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I watched:

Diary of a Chambermaid  (1964)  -  7/10

Diary_of_a_Chambermaid.jpg

The Legend of Blood Mountain aka Demon Hunter  (1965)  -  2/10

MV5BZDlhMTgyOWUtYjA0Zi00YWIyLWExYzktMDcz

The Woman Who Wouldn't Die aka Catacombs  (1965)  -  6/10

MV5BZDA3OTlmYzgtZjFlYS00ZmY4LTkzN2QtMDY5

Five Golden Dragons  (1967)  -  4/10

220px-Five_Golden_Dragons_1967_Poster.jp

God Forgives...I Don't!  (1967)  -  7/10

God-Forgives-I-Dont-1967-poster-04-350.j

La collectionneuse  (1967)  -  5/10

220px-Collectionneuse_346_DVD.jpg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us