speedracer5

I Just Watched...

21,374 posts in this topic

6 hours ago, EricJ said:

If you've joined one of THOSE film clubs that think David Lynch is a god on earth, and made you watch Mulholland Drive for your enlightenment and initiation, you have my sympathies.¬†ūüėȬ†¬†FMM, Lynch is watchable, but only up through Blue Velvet, inclusive. ¬†(And then the second season of Twin Peaks happened, as has already been discussed at length.)

Essential Lynch is still Eraserhead, but as long as you go in prepared, and know what the heck you're in for.  That one probably the most sums up Lynch's attempt at a "dreamlike" style--literally--and it's interesting if you know what you're watching, but there don't tend to be middle-ground opinions about it.  (If you're squeamish, The Elephant Man keeps most of the visual tricks on a more stable linear plot.)

thankfully, they aren't all like that. I think there are over 100 members... i just try different films out and see if i like them or not lol. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

film-falbalas3.jpeg

I caught Jacques Becker's Falabas or Paris Frills (1945) at Toronto's TIFF Cinematheque yesterday.  It was filmed during the occupation and is about the world of haute couture.  Raymond Rouleau plays a famous dressmaker who callously juggles women while he obsessively works on his next collection which must have a common thread.  He is a perfectionist who is prone to tantrums and never seems to be without his pins.  Then he meets a woman from a common background who becomes both his muse and downfall.  Gabrielle Dorziat plays his business-like partner.  She is an old maid who runs the House of Clarence and its 350 female workers.  Rouleau calls her his only relative which I took to mean his sister.  Does any of this sound vaguely familiar?

1515544263_phantom_thread_unit_daniel_da

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

L'enfance nue  (1968)  -  5/10

enfance-nue.png

What a unique movie poster! Must be a foreign film.

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, rayban said:

How did they get Alain Delon to do this?ÔĽŅ

$$$$$$$$

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Flower of My Secret  (1995)  -  6/10

220px-The_Flower_of_My_Secret.jpg

Spanish melodrama from Pedro Almodovar. Leo Macias (Marisa Paredes) is an unhappy middle-aged writer of romance novels whose military-officer husband (Imanol Arias) is distant both in proximity (he's been deployed to Bosnia) and in his affections. Leo seeks sympathy from her friend Betty (Carme Elias), but she seems troubled with her own issues. Meanwhile, Angel (Juan Echanove) is a chubby, middle-aged editor who wants to publish Leo's new works, while also harboring a crush on her. With Rossy de Palma, Chus Lampreave, Kiti Manver, Joaquin Cortes, Manuela Vargas, and Jordi Molla. I didn't warm to this tale as much as Almodovar's others, and would probably rank it last among those that I've seen. It's not terrible, but it's not very memorable either. I will grant that Marisa Paredes is given a real acting showcase, and she's terrific in the lead role.

Source: The Criterion Channel

 

Since you are on a Almodovar kick, which Almodovar flick has Victoria Abril as a blond running around nude for practically¬†most¬†of the film?¬†ūü§™

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

What a unique movie poster! Must be a foreign film.

Either that, or we're looking at some serious censorship.

///

enfance-nue.png

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they really put a lot of thought into IRENE DUNNE'S SUTS DAY including quite a few titles of hers I have not seen- besides ANN VICKERS and WHEN TOMORROW COMES, they showed IF I WERE FREE, a 1933 PRECODE she did at RKO, pretty standard stuff really- British drawing room fare about a man and woman who cannot be together because of her shiftless ex and his crazy, manipulative wife who won't grant a divorce. LAURA HOPE CREWS has a REALLY GOOD PART as the mother of the male lead; she does quite a bit to make this thing more interesting.

altogether, it's fine, and DUNNE- as always- is wonderful (really, it's amazing given her background how many "other women" she played, but they're always so classy and coming from a place that you can understand.)

THE DEFINITE WEAK LINK IS BRITISH ACTOR CLIVE BROOK, who spends most of the film looking away from his other actors or even down at the floor in important scenes- to the point where i had to wonder if maybe that was where his lines were written. He starred in CAVALCADE the same year, which won the best picture and then his career went largely pfffffft it seems, even in his native Britain.

IfIWereFree20.jpg

If-I-Were-Free-1933-2.jpg

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Since you are on a Almodovar kick, which Almodovar flick has Victoria Abril as a blond running around nude for practically¬†most¬†of the film?¬†ūü§™

That must be one that I haven't seen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Dark Corner (1946)

A minor but well crafted and satisfying film noir from 20th Century Fox, about a private eye with a mysterious past, followed for some reason by a mystery man in a white suit, who gets the feeling that he is being set up for some kind of frame.

Film veteran Henry Hathaway was at the helm of this production, its opening and closing titles benefiting from the always welcoming lush orchestral sounds of Alfred Newman's "Street Scene" music. The film also has some appropriately moody photography, as well as some tough, spare dialogue.

"I feel dead inside," the frustrated gumshoe says at one moment, "I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me."

Love it!

The detective is played by fourth billed Mark Stevens, who is really the main player in this film. If he's a little nondescript compared to a Bogart or Mitchum, he's still an efficient actor and is convincing in his role. Lucille Ball, playing his loyal secretary who takes a special interest in him, is surprisingly quite terrific in a dramatic role here. She looks great, even a little sexy, and brings the P.I. the only sense of support that he has in a dark, lonely world in which unknown forces are closing in upon him.

MV5BY2E3MjgyZmQtZmRiMS00M2MyLWJkMzgtNDQw

The supporting players are also strong. William Bendix plays the guy in the white suit who's tougher and more ruthless than initially appears to be the case, while Clifton Webb plays the owner of an art gallery, with a young wife he adores (Cathy Downs) as well as a portrait, the subject of which looks strikingly like his wife. Webb's casting in this film has a real feeling of familiarity for those who had seen him in a similar role in Laura, made for the same studio two years before.

Dark-Corner-3-620x400.png

Film noir fans, and even a few of those not into the genre, should be pleased with this one.

220px-Dark_Corner_1946.JPG

3 out of 4

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Freedom  (1968)  -  5/10

MV5BYTdmYTM2NjktMjExMC00ZDk4LTk2ZDQtZGFj

Political satire from writer-director William Klein. Mr. Freedom (John Abbey) is a red-white-&-blue superhero that represents all that is "great" (awful) about America. He's ordered by his supervisor Dr. Freedom (Donald Pleasence) to travel to France, where the local superhero Captain Formidable (Yves Montand) has disappeared. Mr. Freedom must stop the heroes of the Soviet Union and Red China from turning France into another communist state. With Delphine Seyrig, Philippe Noiret, Serge Gainsbourg, Jean-Claude Drouot, Rufus, Sami Frey, Catherine Rouvel, and Simone Signoret. A little of this obnoxious, raucous comedy goes a long way. It has all the subtlety and nuance of a jackhammer on concrete. Director Klein uses his pop art sensibilities to their fullest, and the film is garishly colorful and very loud. The first half is exhausting and more interesting.

Source: The Criterion Channel

mr_-freedom.png?w=538

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Panic in the City  (1968)  -  5/10

220px-Paniccitypos.jpg

Suspense thriller with Howard Duff as a government agent trying to stop a bunch of commies led by Nehemiah Persoff from setting off a nuke in L.A. With Linda Cristal, Anne Jeffreys, Dennis Hopper, Oscar Beregi, Stephen McNally, John Hoyt, Steve Franken, Wesley Lau, and Mike Farrell. This looks like a TV movie, but it wasn't. It's very routine, with no surprises or tension. I watched it for Hopper, in his last role before Easy Rider, here playing a paid killer for all of 5 minutes.

Source: Amazon Prime video

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stolen Kisses  (1968)  -  7/10

h39p97Pn0b55PV63PislftZslhk.jpg

French comedy from writer-director Francois Truffaut. Antoine Doniel (Jean-Pierre Leaud), the young protagonist of The 400 Blows (1959), is now in the army, but he's soon drummed out of the service for being irresponsible. Back in civilian life, he struggles to find and maintain a job until he becomes the unlikely new employee of a private detective agency. While Antoine tries to rekindle an old affair with contemporary Christine (Claude Jade), he finds himself also smitten with the wife (Delphine Seyrig) of one of his clients (Michel Lonsdale). With Harry-Max, Andre Falcon, Daniel Ceccaldi, Catherine Lutz, and Marie-France Pisier. I went into this expecting to hate it, but was in fact charmed and amused. It has sharp dialogue, a great cast of characters, and excellent pacing. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One  (1968)  -  6/10

SYM_Current_medium.jpg

Arthouse quasi-documentary from director William Greaves. A group of filmmakers are working on a film in Central Park, while another film crew films the behind-the-scenes action. With Patricia Ree Gilbert and Don Fellows as the stars of the film-within-a-film. The nature of drama and narrative is deconstructed, I guess, but this seems terribly dated now, as there are literally hundreds of DVD/Blu-ray bonus features that depict the same trials and tribulations of filmmaking and the creative process, and those are focused on actual movies rather than a fictional one. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Stolen Kisses  (1968)  -  7/10

h39p97Pn0b55PV63PislftZslhk.jpg

French comedy from writer-director Francois Truffaut. Antoine Doniel (Jean-Pierre Leaud), the young protagonist of The 400 Blows (1959), is now in the army, but he's soon drummed out of the service for being irresponsible. Back in civilian life, he struggles to find and maintain a job until he becomes the unlikely new employee of a private detective agency. While Antoine tries to rekindle an old affair with contemporary Christine (Claude Jade), he finds himself also smitten with the wife (Delphine Seyrig) of one of his clients (Michel Lonsdale). With Harry-Max, Andre Falcon, Daniel Ceccaldi, Catherine Lutz, and Marie-France Pisier. I went into this expecting to hate it, but was in fact charmed and amused. It has sharp dialogue, a great cast of characters, and excellent pacing. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

 

It's a totally beguiling film.

The first film in the Antoine Doniel trilogy.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teorema  (1968)  -  7/10

Teorema_film_Pier_Paolo_Pasolini_xlg.jpg

Italian drama with touches of surrealism, political allegory and fantasy, from writer-director Pier Paolo Pasolini. A mysterious stranger, identified only as The Visitor (Terence Stamp), arrives at the estate of a wealthy bourgeois family. He consoles, comforts and seduces each member of the family, including the son (Andres Jose Cruz Soublette), the daughter (Anne Wiazemsky), the mother (Silvana Mangano), and the father (Massimo Girotti), as well as the pious maid (Laura Betti). When The Visitor then leaves, each member of the household reacts in striking ways.

110692959f7e4e3e67f359c3e8388888.jpg

This is a well made film, with good cinematography, and a good score (partially by Ennio Morricone). It was also a lot more chaste than I was expecting; for some reason, I was prepared for a Salo-style litany of outrages, but nothing in this movie would cause a ripple nowadays. I'm not really sure what Pasolini was saying, either. I've read that it was an indictment of middle-class complacency and American consumerism,  as well as a call for societal upheaval. Sure, if you say so. I also had a hard time with the Italian dubbing on Stamp and Wiazemsky, but that couldn't be helped, I guess. I still thought the film was interesting, and I was never bored by it.

Source: The Criterion Channel

teorema-movie-review-pier-paolo-pasolini

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I also had a hard time with the Italian dubbing on Stamp and Wiazemsky, but that couldn't be helped, I guess.

The version you watched had English subtitles with the dialog in Italian,  right?   

Do you speak Italian?    I ask these questions because if one is reading the subtitles,   how does poor dubbing in a language one doesn't understand impact the viewing of the film?

      

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, jamesjazzguitar said:

The version you watched had English subtitles with the dialog in Italian,  right?   

Do you speak Italian?    I ask these questions because if one is reading the subtitles,   how does poor dubbing in a language one doesn't understand impact the viewing of the film?

You can't read the subtitles and look at the actors at the same time? I watch a lot of subtitled films, and yes, I notice the actors while also reading the subtitles. It's also a matter of knowing what Stamp and Wiazemsky sound like from seeing them in other films. Some of the others may have been dubbed by others, but I'm not familiar with their voices, so I didn't notice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

You can't read the subtitles and look at the actors at the same time? I watch a lot of subtitled films, and yes, I notice the actors while also reading the subtitles. It's also a matter of knowing what Stamp and Wiazemsky sound like from seeing them in other films. Some of the others may have been dubbed by others, but I'm not familiar with their voices, so I didn't notice.

I watch films with subtitles the same way as you describe above, and I have seen poor duping, but I can't recall if I have seen duping so poor that it had any impact on my viewing experience.     I guess the duping of these two was that bad.    The 'familiar with their voices' thing is something I fully understand but most of the French and Italian films I see don't have English speaking actors I'm familiar with. 

Is it safe to assume that in the plot,  'the visitor' was a foreigner?   I.e. that is why an English actor was hired for the role of 'the visitor' to an Italian family.     

But why the casting of French actress Wiazemsky as a member of an Italian family?    (not expecting you know the answer,,,,  just pointing out that the director created an opportunity for this poor-duping by casting her,  as well as anyone else that was playing an Italian, that couldn't speak the language).   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I watch films with subtitles the same way as you describe above, and I have seen poor duping, but I can't recall if I have seen duping so poor that it had any impact on my viewing experience.     I guess the duping of these two was that bad.    The 'familiar with their voices' thing is something I fully understand but most of the French and Italian films I see don't have English speaking actors I'm familiar with. 

Is it safe to assume that in the plot,  'the visitor' was a foreigner?   I.e. that is why an English actor was hired for the role of 'the visitor' to an Italian family.     

But why the casting of French actress Wiazemsky as a member of an Italian family?    (not expecting you know the answer,,,,  just pointing out that the director created an opportunity for this poor-duping by casting her,  as well as anyone else that was playing an Italian, that couldn't speak the language).   

Well, it was common to cast foreign actors in European films from the 1950's on. Italian films featured everyone from Anthony Quinn, Broderick Crawford, and Richard Basehart to Clint Eastwood, Steve Reeves and Bette Davis. And they were all dubbed, at least in the European/Italian versions. It was thought that having a familiar face would increase box office in other territories, which I guess is true. Most European countries did this occasionally, but it was common place for Italian films.

I made the same complaint about Il Bidone and Richard Basehart's dubbing. It was more bothersome than Broderick Crawford's in the same film, because the guy they chose to dub Basehart sounded a lot more different than the one chosen for Crawford. I guess I would rather they cast people who can speak the language in the film rather than dub them, although there are plenty of movies that I've liked and even loved with dubbed performances, too. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vixen!  (1968)  -  7/10

51MR5697G6L._SY445_.jpg

Exploitation gem from director Russ Meyer. Vixen Palmer (Erica Gavin) is married to charter pilot Tom (Garth Pillsbury), but due to his job, she's often left alone at their rural British Columbia cabin. She beds any man she can behind Tom's back, and even goes after the men he brings home for fishing excursions. Vixen, a virulent racist, also butts heads with Niles (Harrison Page), a black American draft-dodging biker who hangs out with Vixen's brother. With Jon Evans, Vincene Wallace, Robert Aiken, Peter Carpenter, and Michael Donovan O'Donnell. Meyer was making the highest quality exploitation films of the period, with professional cinematography and enjoyably camp performances. The genre is hard to pin down, a mix of comedy, melodrama, skin flick, and political statement. Gavin is terrific in the lead, playing a gorgeous yet loathsome person. And she's the protagonist!

Source: internet

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Dark Corner (1946)

A minor but well crafted and satisfying film noir from 20th Century Fox, about a private eye with a mysterious past, followed for some reason by a mystery man in a white suit, who gets the feeling that he is being set up for some kind of frame.

Film veteran Henry Hathaway was at the helm of this production, its opening and closing titles benefiting from the always welcoming lush orchestral sounds of Alfred Newman's "Street Scene" music. The film also has some appropriately moody photography, as well as some tough, spare dialogue.

"I feel dead inside," the frustrated gumshoe says at one moment, "I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me."

Love it!

The detective is played by fourth billed Mark Stevens, who is really the main player in this film. If he's a little nondescript compared to a Bogart or Mitchum, he's still an efficient actor and is convincing in his role. Lucille Ball, playing his loyal secretary who takes a special interest in him, is surprisingly quite terrific in a dramatic role here. She looks great, even a little sexy, and brings the P.I. the only sense of support that he has in a dark, lonely world in which unknown forces are closing in upon him.

MV5BY2E3MjgyZmQtZmRiMS00M2MyLWJkMzgtNDQw

The supporting players are also strong. William Bendix plays the guy in the white suit who's tougher and more ruthless than initially appears to be the case, while Clifton Webb plays the owner of an art gallery, with a young wife he adores (Cathy Downs) as well as a portrait, the subject of which looks strikingly like his wife. Webb's casting in this film has a real feeling of familiarity for those who had seen him in a similar role in Laura, made for the same studio two years before.

Dark-Corner-3-620x400.png

Film noir fans, and even a few of those not into the genre, should be pleased with this one.

220px-Dark_Corner_1946.JPG

3 out of 4

It would have been a 4/4 if the two leads had been Film Noir "A" list-ers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

What a unique movie poster! Must be a foreign film.

It's the Hungarian movie poster for Toy Story 4. ¬†¬†ūüėÜ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Body Stealers  (1969)  -  4/10

The_Body_Stealers_Poster.jpg

British science fiction mystery with Patrick Allen (the poor man's Stanley Baker) as Bob Megan, a dashing government investigator who is asked by the military to look into a strange series of disappearances. It seems parachuting pilots are vanishing into thin air during their descents, and it may have something to do with a strange red mist seen in the area at the time. With Lorna Wilde, Hilary Dwyer, Neil Connery (the poor man's Sean Connery, his brother), George Sanders (the rich man's Tom Conway), Robert Flemyng, Allan Cuthbertson, Michael Culver, and Maurice Evans (the financially stable man's Maurice Evans). From producer Tony Tenser's Tigon Pictures (the poor man's Amicus, which was the poor man's Hammer Film), this is pretty silly and dumb, although it's almost worth it to see the respectable British cast trying to keep a straight face. 

Source: internet

5956-2.jpg

MV5BNzQyNjQ1ZGEtMWZjYi00OGI0LWEzYzctYjRi

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

That must be one that I haven't seen. 

I did some research :D, my bad, it's not a Pedro Almodóvar flick, its FRENCH TWIST (1996) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

they really put a lot of thought into IRENE DUNNE'S SUTS DAY including quite a few titles of hers I have not seen- besides ANN VICKERS and WHEN TOMORROW COMES, they showed IF I WERE FREE, a 1933 PRECODE she did at RKO, pretty standard stuff really- British drawing room fare about a man and woman who cannot be together because of her shiftless ex and his crazy, manipulative wife who won't grant a divorce. LAURA HOPE CREWS has a REALLY GOOD PART as the mother of the male lead; she does quite a bit to make this thing more interesting.

altogether, it's fine, and DUNNE- as always- is wonderful (really, it's amazing given her background how many "other women" she played, but they're always so classy and coming from a place that you can understand.)

THE DEFINITE WEAK LINK IS BRITISH ACTOR CLIVE BROOK, who spends most of the film looking away from his other actors or even down at the floor in important scenes- to the point where i had to wonder if maybe that was where his lines were written. He starred in CAVALCADE the same year, which won the best picture and then his career went largely pfffffft it seems, even in his native Britain.

IfIWereFree20.jpg

If-I-Were-Free-1933-2.jpg

 

I liked Clive early on when he was slightly inebriated in Paris and I felt he connected with her in the early scenes; they are both lonely souls.  However, I still don't quite see him as the romantic lead.  There were some great lines in the cafe scenes with Henry Stephenson.  The first part of the movie works the best.  Dunne gives an excellent and subdued portrayal of a woman who is beaten down by constant emotional abuse of her husband who learns to live for herself.  Bette Davis or Joan Crawford would have plugged him with that pistol in the first scene,which I also wouldn't have minded.   However, since mutual adultery was OK in the pre-Code era (with the support of the mother of one of the parties), we can have a less violent solution.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us