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I Just Watched...

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16 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

Mother Didn't Tell Me (1950): I wasn't familiar with this Dorothy McGuire film, never even heard of it, caught it on her day.

An of-its-time "comedy", she's married to a doctor, with, of course, complications. Dorothy was a pleasure to watch in a non-serious role.

She and June Havoc (also a doctor's wife) wear some nice New Look fashions.... (I don't think they had scenes together in Gentleman's Agreement? )

 

 

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I haven't seen this one either. I recorded it to watch this wknd.

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The Rebel Rousers  (1970)  -  3/10

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Exploitation/biker flick from writer-director Martin B. Cohen. In a small SoCal beach town, a group of filthy bikers led by J.J. (Bruce Dern) terrorize the locals, as well as Paul (Cameron Mitchell) and Karen (Diane Ladd), a couple with marital problems who had just been visiting the area when the bikers arrived. With Jack Nicholson as "Bunny", Harry Dean Stanton, Neil Burstyn (then-husband of Ellen Burstyn), Lou Procopio, Earl Finn, Philip Carey, Robert Dix, and Bud Cardos. This cheap, very dumb biker misfire was shot in '67 but deemed too awful to release. It wasn't until Nicholson achieved fame with Easy Rider that someone decided to dump this into theaters in 1970. It takes some skill to take a cast with such noted scenery chewers as Mitchell, Ladd, Dern and Nicholson and still end up with a boring dud, but director Cohen manages to do so.

Source: YouTube

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Swing Out, Sweet Land  (1970)  -  5/10

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TV-movie/variety show special produced by Budweiser. John Wayne headlines and acts as host and narrator in this look at American history and celebration of patriotism. In true variety show fashion, there are musical numbers (including by the likes of Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, Ann-Margret, Leslie Uggams, and Roy Clark), as well as comedic sketches. The large noteworthy cast includes Bing Crosby (as Mark Twain), Bob Hope (doing a USO show at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War), Lorne Greene (George Washington), Hugh O'Brian (Thomas Jefferson), William Shatner (John Adams), Ross Martin (Alexander Hamilton), Dean Martin (Eli Whitney), Roscoe Lee Browne (Frederick Douglass), Rowan & Martin (Wright brothers), Michael Landon, Dan Blocker, Jack Benny, George Burns, Phyllis Diller, Patrick Wayne, Greg Morris, Celeste Holm, Dennis Weaver, Rick & David Nelson, Red Skelton, Tom Smothers, Ed McMahon, and Lucille Ball as the Statue of Liberty. This is as corny as it sounds, but a good time capsule of the variety show format, and an example of conservative, "Silent Majority" counter-programming. 

Source: YouTube

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Ucho aka The Ear  (1970)  -  7/10

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Czech drama from writer-director Karel Kachyna. A middle-aged couple, Ludvik (Radoslav Brzobohaty) and Anna (Jirina Bohdalova), return home one night after a Communist Party social gathering. In between bickering, they discover that something is amiss, as their electricity is out while the other houses on their street still have it, and it appears someone may have broken in. As they continue to squabble, they become more paranoid that they are being surveilled and targeted by the Party for some unknown offense. An indictment of Iron Curtain oppression dressed as domestic dysfunction, Kachyna's grainy, B&W film is well-executed and well-acted.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

An indictment of Iron Curtain oppression dressed as domestic dysfunction

I reviewed this a few pages back. The historical significance is obvious but you state it quite succinctly where I only implied it. I admire your precision. I added a couple of personal likes about the film, primarily the acting of the lead actress. I found it curious that she was given so much play while her husband, in accordance with a more subdued personality, was given nevertheless a seeming disproportionately less to do. And yet this may have made the film more realistic in some way. I think it emphasized the political aspect of the film and not wanting an over emphasized marriage problem do dilute that. The wife was so annoying at first with her constant nagging and bickering but as the film went along she almost became amusing. Later in the film she really gets scared and starts crying and there is nothing like that to give her a bit of audience sympathy. I adored her performance. ////

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Swing Out, Sweet Land  (1970)  -  5/10

MV5BYzQ0NDYwODAtMWQ0Yi00ZTdlLWEzYTAtNWQz

TV-movie/variety show special produced by Budweiser. John Wayne headlines and acts as host and narrator in this look at American history and celebration of patriotism. In true variety show fashion, there are musical numbers (including by the likes of Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, Ann-Margret, Leslie Uggams, and Roy Clark), as well as comedic sketches. The large noteworthy cast includes Bing Crosby (as Mark Twain), Bob Hope (doing a USO show at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War), Lorne Greene (George Washington), Hugh O'Brian (Thomas Jefferson), William Shatner (John Adams), Ross Martin (Alexander Hamilton), Dean Martin (Eli Whitney), Roscoe Lee Browne (Frederick Douglass), Rowan & Martin (Wright brothers), Michael Landon, Dan Blocker, Jack Benny, George Burns, Phyllis Diller, Patrick Wayne, Greg Morris, Celeste Holm, Dennis Weaver, Rick & David Nelson, Red Skelton, Tom Smothers, Ed McMahon, and Lucille Ball as the Statue of Liberty. This is as corny as it sounds, but a good time capsule of the variety show format, and an example of conservative, "Silent Majority" counter-programming. 

Source: YouTube

This show sounds horrible. I must've missed it, thankfully. I wonder what role Phyllis Diller played???

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10 minutes ago, Hibi said:

This show sounds horrible. I must've missed it, thankfully. I wonder what role Phyllis Diller played???

She was in a bit about women's suffrage. 

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LOL. At least she wasn't Betsy Ross......

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This has been a rewarding and very eclectic movie watching day. What else can you say for a day with a double dose of Marlene Dietrich, Robert Mitchum and Susan Hayward in Africa, George Raft and Mae West's joint debut, a Marx brothers comedy, and finishing up an Ingmar Bergman film started yesterday?

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8 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

... and finishing up an Ingmar Bergman film started yesterday?

Which'n ... if you don't my asking.

///

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Drive, He Said  (1971)  -  6/10

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Drama/comedy based on a novel by Jeremy Larner, co-scripted, co-produced and directed by Jack Nicholson. Hector (William Tepper) is a top college basketball player with a bright future in the sport if he'll just straighten up and take things seriously. He's also having an affair with Olive (Karen Black), the wife of one of his professors (Robert Towne). Meanwhile, Hector's roommate is Gabriel (Michael Margotta) a high-strung radical and mischief maker who may be crazier than everyone thinks. With Bruce Dern as the basketball coach, June Fairchild, Henry Jaglom, David Ogden Stiers, Michael Warren, Charlie Robinson, and Cindy Williams. This "New Hollywood" effort marked Nicholson's directing debut, a career path that was originally his intended one. It's sloppy, with poor pacing, and the script is all over the place, but it has its moments. The scenes with Gabriel at the draft board physical are the highlight, as he does everything in his power to get rejected.

Source: internet

 

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I remember this film, but never got to see it.  Had a quick play off.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

This show sounds horrible. I must've missed it, thankfully. I wonder what role Phyllis Diller played???

Actually, John Wayne was all over variety shows in the late 70's (starting with Dick Martin's running gag on Laugh-In), and this one was more of your standard red-state Bob Hope specials, only with Hope as one of the guests.  Dean Martin plays Eli Whitney in a sketch; quick, guess the joke.  😓

(Yes, dear gods, I actually REMEMBER this one, although I didn't remember the title or it ending up on the cover of TV Guide.  Yes, remember when TV Guide used to have political/industry articles about "How will the FCC crack down on TV violence?", instead of binge-fangirl gossip about the Game Of Thrones finale?)

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The Last Movie  (1971)  -  6/10

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Notorious arthouse drama from writer-director Dennis Hopper. He also stars as Kansas, a Hollywood stuntman in Peru for the filming of a western. After the film wraps and the cast and crew leaves, he decides to stay, and makes time with local prostitute Maria (Stella Garcia). They get mixed up with a rich American couple, as well as villagers who begin re-enacting the movie shoot with equipment made out of sticks. With Julie Adams, Don Gordon, Tomas Milian, Sylvia Miles, Kris Kristofferson, Peter Fonda, Michelle Phillips, Severn Darden, Jim Mitchum, Toni Basil, Rod Cameron, Henry Jaglom, Russ Tamblyn, Dean Stockwell, and Sam Fuller.

Hopper was given free rein for his much-anticipated follow up to Easy Rider, but he went over budget and spent a year trying to edit the movie into a manageable length and a coherent narrative. Whether or not you think he succeeded will be subjective. I thought it was a rambling, self-indulgent mess, with a few interesting images and a couple of decent performances from Adams and Milian. The movie was a flop when it was (barely) released, but it has gained a cult following in the years since. This also marked Hopper's lengthy Hollywood exile, spending much of the decade getting heavier and heavier into drug use, occasionally appearing in small parts, before making a major comeback in the mid-1980's.

Source: internet

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3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Scenes from a Marriage. Wanted to get to it before Watch TCM on it expired.

I just wanted it to be over before I expired. The first half hour, with Bibi Andersson, is reasonably good, but otherwise this is high on my list of official classics I can't take. And yes, I usually like Bergman. Face to Face is even worse, however.

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Mon Oncle Antoine  (1971)  -  7/10

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French-Canadian drama from writer-director Claude Jutra. The inhabitants of a rural Quebecois mining town get ready for Christmas. Young Benoit (Jacques Gagnon) works at the general store owned by his uncle Antoine (Jean Duceppe) and aunt Cecile (Olivette Thibault). Benoit flirts with shopgirl Carmen (Lyne Champagne), while clerk Fernand (director Jutra) flirts with Cecile. This has a pseudo-neo-realist  vibe, with most of the townsfolk coming across as very genuine. The main characters who work at the general store are more traditionally cinematic, but not so much that they detract from the overall sense of place. I've read that many consider this the "greatest Canadian film ever made." I prefer Videodrome.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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GHOST WORLD (2001) *Score: 6.5/10* 

Starring: Steve Buscemi, Scarlett Johansson, Thora Birch, Bob Balaban, Ileana Douglas, Teri Garr (uncredited). 

Birch and Johansson star as best friends Enid and Rebecca (respectively), who have recently graduated from high school. The two have a plan to get jobs and move in together, but these plans get derailed when Enid befriends local audiophile, Seymour. 

Overall, I enjoyed everyone in this. I thought it was a solid take on what can happen to high school friendships after graduation. I've been there, so it certainly struck a chord with me. 

Image result for ghost world 2001

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triple feature last night into this morning of FREAKS (1932), THE THIRTEENTH CHAIR (1929) and ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1933)- all as part of LEILA HYAMS SUTS DAY.

Man, she really was beautiful.

I've gone on at length about all three before, but I re-affirm my reccomendation of THE THIRTEENTH CHAIR, even though it is NOT WITHOUT SOME FAULTS.

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SIDE NOTE: ARE THERE ANY TRULY GREAT AMERICAN FILMS FROM 1929? I can think of some good ones and some interesting ones and even some fascinating ones, but it seems as if PRODUCTION ON THOSE NEW FANGLED "TALKING PIC-CHUHS" TOOK A LITTLE TIME TO GET DOWN.

(and to be fair, I'M SURE IT DID!)

SPEAKING OF, I have come to enjoy the LONG AWKWARD PAUSES IN DIALOGUE IN THIS FILM, which apparently were so projectionists could properly sync the soundtrack with the film (i think, this is also per IMDB and wikipedia.)

BELA SERVES SOME SERIOUS EYEBROW IN THIS.

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TAKE THIS REVIEW MEASURED WITH THE FACT THAT I COULD WATCH BELA LUGOSI READ OUT LOUD FROM THE SAN ANTONIO PHONEBOOK, although, to be fair, MARGARET WYCHERLY also draws you in to some scenes that a less gifted actress would leave you snoozing during.

i DID (OOPS) not know this film existed until flipping thru the PSYCHOTRONIC FILM AND VIDEO GUIDE a few years ago. watched it on youtube and have caught it (and the inferior 1937 remake) on TCM  a few times since then.

I am so happy they took a risk on "YOUNG" (40 year old?) BELA and gave him this WONDERFUL EARLY SOUND ROLE...the film really ends up becoming HIS in the last two acts.

Yes, to be fair THERE ARE a few "VADDLING IN HIS GRANDVODDER'S VOODSCHTOPPES!!!!" moments where he's hard to understand (or should I perhaps say deliciously enigmatic in his diction, but to me that adds to the comic potential that always seems lurking 'neath some arch in a TOD BROWNING production....)

Also worth watching for the set design, I enjoy all the parlor palms and mis-matched wicker...I get the sense that set decoration of the 1920's was a bit more grounded in reality than in the next several decades to come.

typically-bad-camera-angle-the-thirteent

 

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12 hours ago, kingrat said:

I just wanted it to be over before I expired. The first half hour, with Bibi Andersson, is reasonably good, but otherwise this is high on my list of official classics I can't take. And yes, I usually like Bergman. Face to Face is even worse, however.

I have to disagree. It's better watched in installments as when it was shown on Swedish tv

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12 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

GHOST WORLD (2001) *Score: 6.5/10* 

Starring: Steve Buscemi, Scarlett Johansson, Thora Birch, Bob Balaban, Ileana Douglas, Teri Garr (uncredited). 

Birch and Johansson star as best friends Enid and Rebecca (respectively), who have recently graduated from high school. The two have a plan to get jobs and move in together, but these plans get derailed when Enid befriends local audiophile, Seymour. 

Overall, I enjoyed everyone in this. I thought it was a solid take on what can happen to high school friendships after graduation. I've been there, so it certainly struck a chord with me. 

I LOVE this film! One of my favorites of the 21st century.

It came out at a time when there were many high school comedies, usually about ugly ducklings suddenly becoming the prom queen. This a sharp and hilarious satire with great performances. It concerns outcasts who actually like it that way and it doesn't have any pat happy endings. The scenes in the art classes are some of the funniest things ever, it pokes fun at pretentious art snobs and political correctness.

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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

I have to disagree. It's better watched in installments as when it was shown on Swedish tv

Yeah, same with Fanny and Alexander. You're really missing out if you don't watch the entire thing. 

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On 8/21/2019 at 5:17 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

As for Ricky Nelson;  he's the guy you'd bring home to meet the parents pretending to be your boyfriend,  while you double date with Luke Perry and Ricky's actual girlfriend.     

 

 

Sorry, but these pallid boys can't hold a candle to Errol.

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On 8/22/2019 at 9:02 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I AM SO SORRY, In my rush to word vomit my feelings in re: SUSAN SLADE, i did not even get to THE BURNING BABY SCENE which, SERIOUSLY- THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXACT TRANSCRIPTION (FROM MEMORY) OF MY HONEST-TO-GOD THOUGHTS ON WATCHING THE SCENE FOR THE FIRST TIME THAT EVENING:

"What the Hell...? Well, the child has gone and set a life-size doll of himself on fire. Who the hell gives a little boy a life-sized doll of himself? That is odd. And of course he's going to burn it, i mean- give a little boy a life size doll and you're lucky if setting it on fire is ALL he does to it...Wait, now Troy is wrapping a blanket around it? No, you're going to get SCALDING HOT PLASTIC ON YOU, TROY...Wait, now they're taking the burned doll to the hospi...

[FINALLY GETS IT]

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH!!!!!!!!

Oh that is cheap!"

SERIOUSLY THOUGH, there was AT LEAST a 15 second delay before i realized it was supposed to be the child and not a doll the child set on fire.

this movie took me down at least three IQ points...I've been thinking about re-watching it.

You have done great service to us all by watching and reviewing this film, sparing any further drops in the IQ level of the members of the forum.  Thank you for your sacrifice:)

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I had an extraordinarily awful day. I watched 4 movies, but due to the nature of the day's awfulness, I can't say that my reaction to them (I disliked them all) was due solely or even primarily to the movies themselves. The movies were:

  • Trafic (1971), a French comedy from Jacques Tati
  • WR: Mysteries of the Organism (1971), a Hungarian arthouse freak-out from Dusan Makavejev
  • The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (1972), a German melodrama with an all female cast from Rainer Werner Fassbinder
  • Red Psalm (1972), a Hungarian musical drama from director Milos Jancso

So forgive me for not going into detail on these. If anyone feels strongly about them, feel free to chime in with accolades or condemnations. 

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