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I Just Watched...

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was quite happy to come across KEN RUSSELL'S 1988 LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM, which I believe I saw on cinemax or showtime sometime in the 1990's and have been looking for ever since i watched CRIMES OF PASSION last summer.

numerous sources claim this is a "loose adaptation" of BRAM STOKER'S STORY, it's not, it's actually a DECIDEDLY FAITHFUL ADAPTATION moved cleverly to the present day and stands as a pretty good example of someone taking some odd, outdated material and doing a pretty good job at adapting it into something people today would watch. (I actually listened to the story on AUDIOBOOK several years ago and it is...um, really something.)

HUGH GRANT absolutely seems like a future star and is perfect in a role that would be not the least out of place in a JAMES WHALE HORROR movie, PETER CAPALDI is also terrific- the surprising weak spots for me were the three actresses, while KEN RUSSELL movies have their admitted shortcomings, they often have INCREDIBLE PERFORMANCES from actresses who are fully committed to an astonishing degree (KATHLEEN TURNER in CRIMES OF PASSION comes to mind immediately) that's not present here, the female protagonists are quite weak (although CATHERINE OXENBERG is fetching in her NANA KNICKERS (the BRITISH EQUIVALENT TO GRANNY PANTIES); AMANDA DONOHOE seems willing, but  it seems like she was not offered much in the way of direction (she embaresses herself in a dance scene)

it's still fun and cheeky and highly watchable and there are some great locations (including WAYNE MANOR FROM 1989 BATMAN) and the SCOTTISH EQUIVALENT OF GWAR SHOWS UP IN ONE SCENE!!!!

...at the same time, there are also some moments that feel a tad amateurish (I think RUSSELL was a brilliant mind hampered in later years by SOMETHING...drugs? demons? both..?)

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Great movie,with Amanda Donohoe- a revelation for me then,i saw the movie at the Montreal World film festival in 1988, sort of camp movie by Russell, a must see.

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Hunchback of the Morgue  (1973)  -  7/10

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Spanish horror with Paul Naschy as Wolfgang Gotho, a slow-witted hunchback who works at an Austrian morgue. He's in love with a terminally ill girl (Maria Elena Arpon), the only person who treats him nicely, and when she dies, he snaps and starts killing people. He meets a scientist, Dr. Orla (Alberto Dalbes), who promises to restore the dead girl's life if Gotho will supply the necessary biological materials. With Rosanna Yanni, Victor Barrera/Vic Winner, Kino Pueyo, Angel Menendez, and Maria Perschy. I was expecting a sappy cornball romance, but this movie gets pretty crazy, with outrageous gore and bizarre plot developments. I was especially impressed by Dr. Orla's giant vat of pulsating internal-organ meat. Recommended to those with a taste for Euro-sleaze insanity.

Source: Scream Factory Blu-ray

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Bambi (1942)

A year ago hiking along a nature trail, while crossing a bridge, I looked down upon a thicket and saw in a clearing a deer reaching up to eat some leaves off a branch. I was enchanted by the sight and watched the animal in appreciative silence. After a minute or two I saw a slight rustle in the bushes behind the deer and saw a fawn emerge beside her. I watched these two for several minutes. They saw me too, or, at least the mother did, but, as I remained still and said nothing, they didn't flee. I watched them for several more minutes before they disappeared into the thicket. It was a lovely moment.

Last week I hiked along the same path and, as I approached the same bridge, I thought of those two deer. As I did so I glanced down into that same thicket and there, in a clearing, not more than one hundred yards from where I saw the deer last year, I spotted a stag reaching up to eat some leaves off a branch. After about three minutes he was gone, disappeared into the thick bush around him, and I again felt honoured to have seen one of nature's most beautiful creatures. I even wondered if I might have just seen the same fawn from last year, now a young adult.

In view of that sighting I decided to watch one of Disney's most famous animated features for the first time in years. I had re-viewed both Snow White and Pinocchio within the past year and, to be honest, while I appreciated the animation of both, neither feature film really touched me emotionally and I was, in that respect, a little disappointed.

That was not, I'm pleased to say, the case with Bambi. Disney's lyrical appreciation of nature and the circle of life still enchants through a combination of still impressive animation, music and the anthromorphic characterizations of its central figures.

The fairy tale nature of this presentation, of course, is such that (and I accepted it while it has nothing to do with reality) all the animals in the film are friends with one another. The wise old, if slightly grumpy, owl never swoops down to prey upon any of the forest creatures. Birds, squirrels, rabbits, skunks and, of course, deer all happily intermingle with one another in this forest glade. There is only one enemy in this film, and that is first powerfully conveyed in one of the most effective sequences in the production.

A young Bambi, still discovering the wonders of his wooded world, is startled to see all the deer suddenly fleeing in one direction. An ominous musical score is now building on the film's soundtrack, as a cacophony of crows in flight flee high from the woods.  Not only do the deer flee but the birds and all small animals run away in panic. Bambi is startled and scared, too young to understand what's happening, calling out for his mother who, in turn, is searching for him.

There's a shot of Bambi, painfully vulnerable and alone in the middle of the meadow, as he runs back and forth not knowing what to do, until he is joined by a stag, The Prince of the Forest, to whom all the deer look for guidance. He leads Bambi, now joined by his mother, quickly out of the meadow and towards the woods. As he does so the ominous sounds of the music builds and then suddenly stops. There is silence followed by a rifle shot.

Soon after, now in the safety of the woods, Bambi's mother emerges and looks around, calling out to a still frightened Bambi to join her. "What happened, mother?" he asks, "Why did we all run?"

There is a three second delay, building for full impact, before she replies.

"Man," she answers, "was in the forest."

Bambi has a number of lovely moments, particularly those when as a young fawn he is on spindly legs learning to walk and later playing with his friends. Thumper, a mischievious small rabbit, and Flower, a shy skunk, are his two close friends. The voice characterization, in particular, of Thumper, done by young Peter Behn, is a marvel of childlike innocence and curiosity, adding as much to the characterization of this little rabbit as the animators. When Bambi goes sprawling once again, can anyone forget young Thumper's marvelous "Did the young Prince fall down?" rejoinder to the action?

SPOILER ALERT: Of course, one of the most powerful scenes captured in animation occurs when Bambi's mother is killed. Difficult to imagine many audience members not having to fight the tears when a panicked young Bambi ventures into a winter blizzard calling out in vain for his mother. I wonder, too, how many audience members, based on their own life experiences, may be identifying with the little fawn at this moment.

Heart warming and poignant, charming and sweet, with a simple story about nature that never interferes with the characterizations or flow of the action, Bambi still remains the Disney studio at its most affecting.

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3.5 out of 4

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The Loreley's Grasp  (1973)  -  6/10

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Spanish horror from director Amando de Ossorio (Tombs of the Blind Dead). When a bloodthirsty reptilian creature attacks a German town, Elke (Silvia Tortosa), a teacher at an exclusive all-girls school, hires big-game hunter Sigurd (Tony Kendall) to protect the premises. As all of the students (and some of the faculty) pine over the handsome hero, a mysterious woman named Lorelei (Helga Line) arrives in town. Could she be connected to the horrible monster terrorizing the countryside? With Josefina Jartin, Loreta Tovar, Jose Thelman, Luis Induni, Angel Menendez, and Luis Barboo. The creature effects are laughable, and the gory attacks are undercut by the amateurish craftsmanship, but I liked the unusual story, and the bevy of beauties in the cast certainly didn't hurt. Helga Line was over 40 in this but still looked phenomenal, while Silvia Tortosa is one of the most beautiful women that I've seen in a film in some time. Also released as When the Screaming Stops.

Source: Scream Factory Blu-ray

Helga Line as Lorelei

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Silvia Tortosa as the best looking school teacher in Germany.

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Desert bloom (1986)--- Actually saw this yesterday and rewatched much of Terms of Endearment since then, but just wanted to give a shout out to this neglected film. It's excellent. Annabeth Gish, Jon Voight, Jobeth Williams, and Ellen Barkin are all in rare form in a coming of age tale set in 1950/1951 Last vegas where a girl grapples with a mother who puts on a brave face to mask her pain, a stepfather who alternates between kindness,meanness, and vulnerability, and a provocative aunt. Great period detail.

Sourse: Amazon Prime

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

I again felt honoured to have seen one of nature's most beautiful creatures.

Uh, you didn't see me.

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Lawrence, you seem to be having a HORROR-ible day. Is this what you meant yesterday or the day before when you said that you were having a horrible day? I thought you meant you were having a, you know, lousy day.

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Just now, laffite said:

Lawrence, you seem to be having a HORROR-ible day. Is this what you meant yesterday or the day before when you said that you were having a horrible day? I thought you meant you were having a, you know, lousy day.

That was Friday, and it was an actual bad day. I don't want to get into it too much, but I had a sudden death in the family. 

These movies today have been very enjoyable, despite the subject matter and the films' qualities. Or perhaps because of them.

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A Man Called Tiger  (1973)  -  5/10

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Hong Kong martial arts action starring Jimmy Wang Yu as Chin Fu, a Chinese tough guy who travels to Japan to investigate the suspicious death of his father. Chin gets caught up in rival gang wars, joining one gang to battle the other which he feels is responsible for his father's demise. With Kawai Okada, Maria Yi, James Tien, Feng Tien, Yoko Minakaze, Kun Li, and Ying-Chieh Han. Originally conceived as a project for Bruce Lee, this was written and directed by Wei Lo, who had helmed Lee's smash hits The Big Boss and Fist of Fury. Lee decided to make Way of the Dragon/Return of the Dragon instead, a film which shares many story similarities with this one. It was strange seeing Jimmy Wang Yu in a contemporary setting, as I'm used to his historical kung-fu flicks. The pacing is off in this one, but I'm not sure if it's just the script or maybe a case of overzealous editing, possibly for the Western film market.

Source: Shout Factory DVD

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

That was Friday, and it was an actual bad day. I don't want to get into it too much, but I had a sudden death in the family. 

Sorry, I didn't know. Condolences.

 

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Tales That Witness Madness  (1973)  -  5/10

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British horror anthology from director Freddie Francis. At an asylum for the criminally insane, a doctor (Donald Pleasence) presents a colleague (Jack Hawkins) with details on four cases. In the first, a young boy (Russell Lewis) has a tiger as an imaginary friend, only it may be more real than his parents (Georgia Brown, Donald Houston) believe. In the second case, a young man (Peter McEnery) inherits an antique bicycle that sends him back in time. In the third case, a man (Michael Jayston) brings a dead tree home to use as home decor, upsetting his wife (Joan Collins. And in the fourth case, a literary agent (Kim Novak) pays special attention to a new writer (Michael Petrovich). Also featuring Suzy Kendall, Frank Forsyth, Mary Tamm, and Leon Lissek. The short stories range from silly (the tiger one), to pointless (the bicycle one), to just plain stupid (the dead tree one). Novak replaced Rita Hayworth, who walked off the set on the second day of filming. This was Jack Hawkins' final theatrical film role. He'd lost his voicebox to cancer 7 years earlier, but continued to act, either in silent cameo roles, or dubbed by other actors. In this he was dubbed by Charles Grey. 

Source: Olive/Paramount DVD

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

Bambi (1942)

A year ago hiking along a nature trail, while crossing a bridge, I looked down upon a thicket and saw in a clearing a deer reaching up to eat some leaves off a branch. I was enchanted by the sight and watched the animal in appreciative silence. After a minute or two I saw a slight rustle in the bushes behind the deer and saw a fawn emerge beside her. I watched these two for several minutes. They saw me too, or, at least the mother did, but, as I remained still and said nothing, they didn't flee. I watched them for several more minutes before they disappeared into the thicket. It was a lovely moment.

Last week I hiked along the same path and, as I approached the same bridge, I thought of those two deer. As I did so I glanced down into that same thicket and there, in a clearing, not more than one hundred yards from where I saw the deer last year, I spotted a stag reaching up to eat some leaves off a branch. After about three minutes he was gone, disappeared into the thick bush around him, and I again felt honoured to have seen one of nature's most beautiful creatures. I even wondered if I might have just seen the same fawn from last year, now a young adult.

In view of that sighting I decided to watch one of Disney's most famous animated features for the first time in years. I had re-viewed both Snow White and Pinocchio within the past year and, to be honest, while I appreciated the animation of both, neither feature film really touched me emotionally and I was, in that respect, a little disappointed.

That was not, I'm pleased to say, the case with Bambi. Disney's lyrical appreciation of nature and the circle of life still enchants through a combination of still impressive animation, music and the anthromorphic characterizations of its central figures.

The fairy tale nature of this presentation, of course, is such that (and I accepted it while it has nothing to do with reality) all the animals in the film are friends with one another. The wise old, if slightly grumpy, owl never swoops down to prey upon any of the forest creatures. Birds, squirrels, rabbits, skunks and, of course, deer all happily intermingle with one another in this forest glade. There is only one enemy in this film, and that is first powerfully conveyed in one of the most effective sequences in the production.

A young Bambi, still discovering the wonders of his wooded world, is startled to see all the deer suddenly fleeing in one direction. An ominous musical score is now building on the film's soundtrack, as a cacophony of crows in flight flee high from the woods.  Not only do the deer flee but the birds and all small animals run away in panic. Bambi is startled and scared, too young to understand what's happening, calling out for his mother who, in turn, is searching for him.

There's a shot of Bambi, painfully vulnerable and alone in the middle of the meadow, as he runs back and forth not knowing what to do, until he is joined by a stag, The Prince of the Forest, to whom all the deer look for guidance. He leads Bambi, now joined by his mother, quickly out of the meadow and towards the woods. As he does so the ominous sounds of the music builds and then suddenly stops. There is silence followed by a rifle shot.

Soon after, now in the safety of the woods, Bambi's mother emerges and looks around, calling out to a still frightened Bambi to join her. "What happened, mother?" he asks, "Why did we all run?"

There is a three second delay, building for full impact, before she replies.

"Man," she answers, "was in the forest."

Bambi has a number of lovely moments, particularly those when as a young fawn he is on spindly legs learning to walk and later playing with his friends. Thumper, a mischievious small rabbit, and Flower, a shy skunk, are his two close friends. The voice characterization, in particular, of Thumper, done by young Peter Behn, is a marvel of childlike innocence and curiosity, adding as much to the characterization of this little rabbit as the animators. When Bambi goes sprawling once again, can anyone forget young Thumper's marvelous "Did the young Prince fall down?" rejoinder to the action?

SPOILER ALERT: Of course, one of the most powerful scenes captured in animation occurs when Bambi's mother is killed. Difficult to imagine many audience members not having to fight the tears when a panicked young Bambi ventures into a winter blizzard calling out in vain for his mother. I wonder, too, how many audience members, based on their own life experiences, may be identifying with the little fawn at this moment.

Heart warming and poignant, charming and sweet, with a simple story about nature that never interferes with the characterizations or flow of the action, Bambi still remains the Disney studio at its most affecting.

aHxebzN.png

3.5 out of 4

 

this whole write-up spoke to me

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11 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Ellen Barkin are all in rare form

Barkin is in a lot of films; her performances are consistently good, she always adds strength to any movie she's in. Why didn't she become a bigger star?

6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

a doctor (Donald Pleasence)

Also in a lot of films. Consistently overacts- silly, campy performances. Why did he become such a big star?

Oh yeah, I think BAMBI is Disney's masterpiece. Just gorgeous storytelling with pictures-the animators really got the movement & weight drawn correctly. I love the April Shower song and the mouse washing his face with one raindrop.

When I first saw THE LION KING at the theater, and the heavy handedness of the song & animation of "Circle of Life" I just groaned. No comparison.

12 hours ago, TomJH said:

can anyone forget young Thumper's marvelous "Did the young Prince fall down?"

I like, "It's alright....the water's STIFF"

 

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Oh yeah, I think BAMBI is Disney's masterpiece. Just gorgeous storytelling with pictures-the animators really got the movement & weight drawn correctly. I love the April Shower song and the mouse washing his face with one raindrop.

When I first saw THE LION KING at the theater, and the heavy handedness of the song & animation of "Circle of Life" I just groaned. No comparison.

 

 

I saw The Lion King years ago and, though my memory of the film is quite vague now, recall enjoying it. But the Disney studio was clearly trying to create major song hits with this production, and as a film it lacks the subtlety of Bambi, I feel.

Like the title character himself Bambi is such a sweet, gentle film. It's not hitting the viewer over the head with "dynamic" over-the-top action sequences, like so many animated features these days seem to do.

Man, the enemy, never appears in the film, but the ominous "Man" musical theme used in the film tells you all you need to know about him as a negative force of destruction. His unseen presence in the forest is all the more effective for it. If they remade Bambi today they would undoubtedly feature "man" characters as gross caricatures of evil, as opposed to the 1942 production.

Bambi truly is a lovely film that fully deserves its reputation as one of the great Disney achievements, with the musical accompaniment playing no small part in its effectiveness..

Bambi-1942.jpg

 

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Turkish Delight  (1973)  -   7/10

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Dutch drama based on the book by Jan Wolkers. Volatile artist Erik (Rutger Hauer) enters into an intense relationship with the young, spoiled Olga (Monique van de Ven), displeasing her mother (Tonny Huurdeman). Also with Wim van den Brink, Dolf de Vries, and Hans Boskamp. This very sexually graphic romantic drama also has a lot of outrageous comedy, mainly due to Erik's unpredictable behavior, which alternates from loving to churlish to puckish. Hauer, in his first substantial film role, is outstanding, and van de Ven, making her debut, holds her own. Both stars are frequently in various states of undress, with no quarter left covered. The film is considered a major cultural touchstone in its homeland, and was nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. I enjoyed it for the performances, and was impressed by director Paul Verhoeven's aesthetic. The story, which comes across as a raunchier version of Love Story, was less impressive.

Source: internet

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A Virgin Among the Living Dead  (1973)  -  2/10

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European* supernatural horror from writer-director Jess Franco. Christina (Christina von Blanc) travels to her family estate when she receives news of the death of her father (Paul Muller). Her relatives behave strangely, and she begins having dreams about her resurrected father. With Howard Vernon, Carmen Yazalde, Rosa Palomar, Anne Libert, and Jess Franco as Basilio. This incoherent travesty features a lot of nudity and a nonsensical plot. It has many of Franco's usual stylistic touches, like extreme close-ups, awkward pauses, out of focus cinematography, and an obtrusive score. This is apparently available in many versions under a half dozen or more titles, including Zombie 4, but not to be confused with Zombie 4: After Death (1989). Some versions run almost 30 minutes longer, with footage from Jean Rollin's 1981 film Zombie Lake added. I would suggest skipping them all.

*Like many of Franco's films, the nation of origin is hard to pin down. This was a France/Belgium/Lichtenstein/Italy co-production, originally released in French, but shot in Portugal.

Source: YouTube - they have the 78-minute "director's cut", which is light on violence but heavy on nudity.

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21 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

A Virgin Among the Living Dead  (1973)  -  2/10

 

This sounds very much as if it is a cheap rehash of Rollin's The Nude Vampire (1970). I am sorry to say that there are so few French surreal soft-core horror romance movies that one must not complain overmuch of the quality when you do find one.

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I watched TWO FOR THE SEESAW - and you should, too. I did not expect to like it, and it's quite predictable. It's also quite emblematic of its type: mid-1950s to late-1960s two-person drama, the sort of thing that a viewer can tell was conceived as a play.

What is appealing about it is the performance of Shirley MacLaine, here playing a more tragic variation on the Fran Kubelik character from THE APARTMENT. She's a kookier, quirkier version of the lovelorn single woman in a cold city. Her character is validated and made more hopeful by the arrival of buttoned-down attorney with some vulnerabilities of his own. That character is played, rather unexpectedly, by Robert Mitchum. It's not the Mitchum one will have expected from his previous roles (esp. CAPE FEAR, released the same year), but he is convincing and affecting.

If you watch it, you'll note how interesting mid-20th Century New York City could be even when not glamorized - as for example in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S (released the previous year.)  And you may be interested to be on the lookout for Ken Berry and Ann Morgan Guilbert in bit parts. ... it's on Watch TCM

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Zatoichi's Conspiracy  (1973)  -  7/10

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25th and final entry in the classic Japanese film series.  Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu), the blind masseur and master swordsman, decides to visit his hometown, only to find it subjugated under the rule of a crooked administrator, a cruel yakuza gang, and a scheming businessman (Eiji Okada), who had been a childhood friend of Ichi. With Yukiyo Toake, Kei Sato, Yoshio Tsuchiya, Rie Yokoyama, Tatsuo Endo, and Takashi Shimura. The series goes out (sort of) on a high note with this well-structured installment. It's helped immensely by two noteworthy guest stars - Eiji Okada (Hiroshima Mon AmourWoman in the Dunes) as the chief villain, and Takashi Shimura (IkiruSeven Samurai) as a benevolent old potter. Katsu continued to play Zatoichi in a TV series that ran from 1974 to 1979 and 98 episodes, before returning to the big screen in 1989 for one final film. He would die in 1997 at age 65. Since then, there have been several new film versions of Zatoichi, to varying success.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

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Ali: Fear Eats the Soul  (1974)  -  7/10

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German drama from writer-director Rainer Werner Fassbinder. 65-year-old Emmi (Brigitte Mira) is a lonely cleaning woman. One night she meets Ali (El Hedi ben Salem), a Moroccan immigrant laborer half her age. The two begin an unlikely romance and quickly get married, but everyone else around them disapproves, either due to racism, xenophobia or ageism. With Rainer Werner Fassbinder as Emmi's lazy son-in-law, Irm Hermann, Elma Karlowa, Margit Symo, Marquard Bohm, and Peter Gauhe.

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I thought both of the leads were awful at first, but Mira grew on me by film's end. Salem never did though, and I thought his amateurish, wooden performance undercut the film quite a bit. Fassbinder's direction is also artificial at times, clunky and unrealistic in a film where realism would be a huge asset. Still, I liked the film, as I'm totally on board with the message that most of humanity are just completely awful people given to all sorts of despicable behavior, only to act nicely when it serves their self-interest.

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Salem was Fassbinder's lover at the time, having left his own wife and multiple children to be with the director. His alcoholism led Fassbinder to leave him, and Salem was later implicated in a series of stabbings. He fled Germany, ending up in France where he was arrested, and then subsequently hung himself in jail. Have a nice day!

Source: The Criterion Channel

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Hi Brrrcold—great post on “Two for the Seesaw.”  I love this movie as well, and feel it doesn’t get its due credit.  Mitchum and (especially) MacLaine are fantastic.  I agree with your statement about how NYC is portrayed in the film.  It practically becomes a third character.  The b&w photography is terrific, as is Andre Previn’s score.  I don’t know how the movie was received in 1962, but I imagine the wistful, bittersweet ending didn’t go over with audiences as well as the more upbeat endings of “The Apartment” and “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”

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Blue Eyes of the Broken Doll  (1974)  -  6/10

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Spanish thriller starring Paul Naschy as Gilles, an ex-con who takes a job as a caretaker and handyman at a large, secluded mansion occupied by three troubled sisters (Diana Lorys, Eva Leon, and Maria Perschy). Gilles starts having nightmares about killing women, while coincidentally a series of grisly murders begin occurring in the nearby town, with the killer's signature being the removal of the victims' eyes. Also featuring Eduardo Calvo, Ines Morales, Antonio Pica, Luis Ciges, and Pilar (mother of Javier) Bardem. As the title may clue you in on, this is a Spanish version of the then-popular Italian giallo mysteries. There's some choice 70's music that makes one think you're watching a porn flick, but it never gets too gratuitous. A snowy shoot-out scene is memorable. I think I prefer the America release title, House of Psychotic Women.

Source: Scream Factory Blu-ray

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Paradise-for-Three-1938.jpg

I watched PARADISE FOR THREE (although in the opening credits it is called ROMANCE FOR THREE!) one of those curious but delightful mid-to-late thirties films MGM did where it's set in EASTERN EUROPE (often Czechoslovakia) and [sometimes] SIG RUMANN is in it, BUT ALL the other actors are AMERICAN [or maybe BRITISH] AS ALL GET-OUT and speak with no accent in spite of having EASTERN EUROPEAN NAMES and dressing like they belong on a box of SWISS MISS COCOA. 

(see also  A WOMAN'S FACE, THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER, THE MARK OF THE VAMPIRE, THE BRIDE WORE RED, THE MORTAL STORM and a lot of others!)

'Twas a trifle, but I liked it, and it had a decidedly LIBITSCHIAN flavor to it.

Then I watched THE CASE OF THE HOWLING DOG, a WB PERRY MASON movie from the early thirties(?) I have no idea why this was a feature length film; it was confusing and dull as dishwater.

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Half of The Grey Fox (1982)

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before my chromecast crapped out, forgot how good it was.

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Evil of Dracula  (1974)  -  6/10

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Japanese horror with Toshio Kurosawa as Professor Shiraki, a teacher newly arrived at a secluded, exclusive girls' academy. The school headmaster (Shin Kishida) is an odd, pale fellow, and when a bunch vampire women attack during Shiraki's first night on the job, he realizes this may not have been the best work assignment to accept. With Mariko Mochizuki, Kunie Tanaka, Katsuhiko Sasaki, and Mio Ota. Another odd blend of Eastern European vampire myth with Japanese culture from the makers of The Vampire Doll and Lake of Dracula. I liked the spookshow musical score, and the atmosphere is nice. This one seemed influenced by The Vampire Lovers, with the emphasis on sexuality and hints of lesbianism, as well as Masahiro Shinoda's 1971 film adaptation of Shusaku Endo's novel Silence.

Source: Arrow Blu-ray

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