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I Just Watched...

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2 minutes ago, GGGGerald said:

Then you wouldn't have the best song. Some artists have the ability to capture a moment longer than a year. Robeta Flack wouldn't have been able to win song of the year back to back for "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" in 1973 and "Killing Me Softly with His Song" in 1974.

Yeah, that would have been just terrible if both of those songs hadn't won.<_<

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OH AND EDIT- THIRD ROCK WAS NOT THE WORST SHOW ON TV AT THE TIME.

shouldn't have been that harsh about it...

You might have liked this exchange:

Lithgow (Dr. Solomon) takes Dr. Albright's (Jane Curtin) parking spot at school and she is angry at him.

He inquires about her car.

Dr. Albright: For future reference,  I have a red Volvo.

Dr. Solomon: Please! We barely know each other!

But I still chuckle at The Constant Nympho

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6 hours ago, laffite said:

Speaking of Columbus Circle, here is another true life adventure. In 1985 I was sitting in a coffee shop there and was nearly mistaken for Charles Bronson. There were three very young men (about 20 maybe) sitting in a booth cross the way who were in a flurry of excitement because they thought they were looking at a big star. "Is that Charles Bronson?" They debated the issue for a few frantic moments before deciding, "Nah, that ain't him." It was flattering there for a moment. but I knew where they were coming from. I had a face that might be termed ruggedly good looking, a sort of wrinkly gravity to my countenance. I had been in a Community Theater production in San Diego the year before and I was described as "a shaggy, likeable actor." Shaggy? Well, sort of. I guess. Anyway, that's what they were responding too. But I had nothing like a real Charles Bronson, that steely gaze, the presence, nor the charisma. Shucks, I was sorry they didn't come over. I wanted to give them my autograph anyway. ///

That same year, I was at a revival of Tom Stoppard's Jumpers at the Aldwych Theatre in London. At the interval, I went to the bathroom. There were a bunch of teenage girls outside the men's room door. I went in, Tom Selleck was alone in there, just standing around. He said hello. I did my business. When I opened the door to go out, the girls screamed, then they saw it was me and quieted down. Selleck must have waited for the interval bells to ring before he left.

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8 minutes ago, Swithin said:

That same year, I was at a revival of Tom Stoppard's Jumpers at the Aldwych Theatre in London. At the interval, I went to the bathroom. There were a bunch of teenage girls outside the men's room door. I went in, Tom Selleck was alone in there, just standing around. He said hello. I did my business. When I opened the door to go out, the girls screamed, then they saw it was me and quieted down. Selleck must have waited for the interval bells to ring before he left.

I tell ya, we ordinary folk get no respect. At least Rodney was able to go on TV and tell jokes.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I TOTALLY HEAR AND UNDERSTAND YOU ON THAT, but I dunno, THE GRAMMYS have been SO SPECTACULARLY WHACKTACULAR since GOD WAS A BOY. like, seriously, it's genuinely HILARIOUS to look at the history of who won what in what years and what did not win- ESPECIALLY BEST NEW ARTIST- which in terms of being A REAL SHOWBIZ KISS OF DEATH is right up there with BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS.

Oh, but Lorna, A Taste of Honey won Best New Artist for "Boogie Oogie Oogie" . . . which kinda proves your point, doesn't it?

And you gotta say this for "Don't Worry, Be Happy"--at least the lyrics are easy to memorize.

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While we're telling celebrity lookalike stories, which I'm enjoying, about 35 years ago I had to call a tow truck for my less than reliable Dodge Dart. The driver said when he first saw me he thought I was Clint Eastwood. It wasn't a pickup line because this guy was very straight, though his eyesight needed checking. I do have the very high and broad forehead that Eastwood has, though otherwise we don't look much alike. Especially in the bank account.

Many thanks to Cinema International for posting those videos of the songs that lost to "Don't Worry, Be Happy." My vote would probably be for "Be Still My Beating Heart" edging out "Giving You the Best That I Got." I also learned that the name of the song is "Shattered Dreams." The singer's diction is not very clear, and for years I've thought it was "Shadow Dreams."

 

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8 hours ago, laffite said:

I think I should be pardoned for my lie because it was virtually truth since though I hadn't seen it, I had seen stills and perhaps the trailer and thought he certainly cut a fine Don. But I have the impression that it was a flop, but I don't even know.

It was a made-for cable TNT movie (back when there were such things, and Robert Halmi was helping 5th-grade English students everywhere by grinding out the Classics miniseries), so "flop" is relative--That may be the reason you don't remember it from theaters.  And, unfortunately being Turner, it wasn't one of the NBC Halmi series that was later dumped onto the streaming ether for perpetuity, like "The Odyssey", "Merlin" and "Alice in Wonderland".

Oh come on it was a hoot.

I got a kick out of the running gag about them bringing home pizza, and how "the pizza parlor always got it wrong." The aliens would invariably carry the pizza box under there arms. Also William Shatner as THE BIG GIANT HEAD, and his white trash "Queen of the Universe."

It was SILLY.  In a good way.  😁  You can't have a sitcom with John Lithgow, Kirstie Alley and French Stewart and not be silly.

And yes, there are those who will come to the defense of Lithgow's performance in Santa Claus: the Movie (1985), for similar reasons.

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

While we're telling celebrity lookalike stories, which I'm enjoying, about 35 years ago I had to call a tow truck for my less than reliable Dodge Dart. The driver said when he first saw me he thought I was Clint Eastwood. It wasn't a pickup line because this guy was very straight, though his eyesight needed checking. I do have the very high and broad forehead that Eastwood has, though otherwise we don't look much alike. Especially in the bank account.

Many thanks to Cinema International for posting those videos of the songs that lost to "Don't Worry, Be Happy." My vote would probably be for "Be Still My Beating Heart" edging out "Giving You the Best That I Got." I also learned that the name of the song is "Shattered Dreams." The singer's diction is not very clear, and for years I've thought it was "Shadow Dreams."

 

The next time someone says that to you, just say, "Make my day" in just the right way and they'll ask you for your autograph.

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3 hours ago, kingrat said:

Oh, but Lorna, A Taste of Honey won Best New Artist for "Boogie Oogie Oogie" . . . which kinda proves your point, doesn't it?

And you gotta say this for "Don't Worry, Be Happy"--at least the lyrics are easy to memorize.

That's a good song. I was just happy that a band (not singing group), led by women won any recognition at all. They had some other good album cuts also. For example: in the late 80's- early 90's, they didn't even have a female rock category claiming there weren't enough eligible artists, which is a joke !

This part of the thread proves why the whole grammys concept may have past the point of relevance. There no longer is any genre that most people listen to. I listen to a lot of music, past and present, and I barely know any of the artists nominated. There no longer is a mainstream.

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I Just Watched...

...Gilda (1946). Well, actually watched it as an adult where I actually knew what was going on. Great film I loved it. Great use of shadow and light, of mysterious backstory, of putting the stars in the light and the supporting actors in the shadow.

Makes me really wonder what could happen in a relationship that would make two people hate each other so much yet, still be in love of each other. I guess Love and Hate aren't opposites, as most people think. The two are very much related.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

It was SILLY.  In a good way.  😁  You can't have a sitcom with John Lithgow, Kirstie Alley and French Stewart and not be silly.

Kirstie Alley wasn't in 3rd Rock from the Sun.

Jane Curtin was in 3rd Rock from the Sun. Jane Curtin was also in Kate & Allie, which may remind one of Kirstie Alley, I guess. 

Kristen Johnston was in 3rd Rock from the Sun. Kristen and Kirstie are similar names, I guess.

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Kings Row (1942). Part of the Scorsese/C_ocks series at the Film Forum.

This is my favorite kind of film: a classic/epic which opens in 1890 with childhood friends whose adult interactions comprise the main body of the film. There are five children at the start: Parris, Drake, Cassie, Louise, and Randy. Parris is a good natured boy who is very fond of Cassie. Drake is wild -- Louise loves him. Randy is kind of a tomboy. An early scene features two birthday parties: Cassie's, which is attended by Parris and almost no-one else; and Louise's, which is attended by Drake and lots of other children. The word is that Louise held her party on the same day as Cassie's for spite. For various dark reasons, Cassie and Louise grow up to be confined to their bedrooms by their fathers.

Parris and Drake -- best friends --are played as adults by Robert Cummings and Ronald Reagan. They're fine, although I think I would have preferred Tyrone Power and possibly Don Ameche. Cassie, Louise, and Randy grow up to be played by Betty Field, Nancy Coleman, and Ann Sheridan. They're excellent, particularly Ms. Sheridan. The older generation includes (perhaps in her best performance) Maria Ouspenskaya as Parris's grandmother; Claude Rains as Cassie's father; and Charles Coburn and Judith Anderson as Louise's parents. Harry Davenport plays a benevolent older friend with a strange beard.

Based on a famous novel, the movie focuses on small-town life and the good and evil therein. The music score -- one of the best -- is by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. You can hear echoes of it years later in John Williams's Star Wars score.

I'm not going to go further into the plot, which is pretty well known and features Ronald Reagan's famous line: "Where's the rest of me?," which became the title of his autobiography. There is great evil in this film, particularly in the character of Charles Coburn. 

But: Since seeing Kings Row again, I read a bit about how the film script differed from the controversial novel. In the novel, Parris and Drake are evidently gay; Dr. Tower (Claude Rains), who takes his daughter Cassie out of school and confines her to her room, does so in the film because of her mental illness. In the novel, it's because they are having an incestuous relationship. I think if you see the film with the knowledge of those relationships, you can sense them from Sam Wood's (the director's) hints. 

I hadn't seen Kings Row in decades and was glad to see it last week in a movie theater, where the audience was rapt.  For me, it represents the best of the old Hollywood. You might say it's the dark side of Our Town, which Sam Wood directed two years earlier.

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Harry Davenport and his beard

Kings Row theme music

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Ann Sheridan, Robert Cummings, Ronald Reagan

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11 hours ago, Swithin said:

Kings Row (1942). Part of the Scorsese/C_ocks series at the Film Forum.

 

Kings Row theme music

 

 

Thanks for the review of Kings Row, Swithin. I'm not much of a fan of soap operas but this highly dramatic, at times impassioned, presentation of Henry Bellamann's best seller about a small town and its dark secrets is a huge exception.

James Wong Howe's stunning black and white photography makes this film a dramatic visual treat, particularly at some of its most melodramatic moments, such as those furtive romantic trysts between Parris (Robert Cummings) and poor troubled Cassie (Betty Field), at one moment their figures seen embracing in a darkened room through the flash of lightning as a thunderstorm booms outside. Erich Wolfgang Korngold's lush magnificent musical score twirls about the lovers, seeming to embrace them at this memorable moment.

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My favourite scene in the film, and one that can bring me to tears, starts tranquilly as Parris and Cassie wander down to a pond they had both regarded as a "special place" when they used to meet there as kids. They love each other but Cassie is cursed with mental health issues she doesn't understand at a time when people didn't speak of such things. Parris cares deeply about her, will, in fact, do anything he can for her, but he doesn't understand her, at times, wild behaviour, mood swings and disappearances.

At this moment by the pond Betty Field has a remarkable scene done in close up. Parris starts to cry after the subject of his dying grandmother is brought up and she embraces him to try to comfort him. At the same time she is trying to deal with her own hidden demons that are tearing her apart.

The camera is upon Field's face as she passionately, tearfully, says this dialogue, climaxed by one of the great lines of the movies, in my opinion:

"Oh, Parris, you're crying."

He tries to dismiss his tears but she responds, "But I DO mind. I mind awfully. Oh, why do you have to have things happen to you? You, the nicest, best.

"Why do any of us have to cry, you or me? What have we done? Oh, I hated it! I hate everything! I'D HATE GOD IF I COULD BUT THERE'S NOTHING YOU CAN REACH!"

The strings of Korngold's musical score gently build in the background as Field has this wondrous moment, magnificently capturing the anguish of a person in deep mental torment, rallying in these few words against those "hidden forces" preying upon her.

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There are a lot of other highlight performances in this film, as well. Ann Sheridan delivers a performance of warmth and sensitivity as a tomboy who grows up to love Drake and stand by him after tragedy strikes. Sheridan doesn't appear in KINGS ROW until the one hour mark but the actress considered this film to be the highlight of her career.

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Kirstie Alley wasn't in 3rd Rock from the Sun.

Jane Curtin was in 3rd Rock from the Sun. Jane Curtin was also in Kate & Allie, which may remind one of Kirstie Alley, I guess. 

Kristen Johnston was in 3rd Rock from the Sun. Kristen and Kirstie are similar names, I guess.

(looks up IMDb)

Johnston, sorry--Both Johnston in "3rd Rock" and Alley in "Cheers" had the same over-the-top comic stress-frazzled-girl performance, so I got them confused.  Both still funny, though.  😁

And, of course, the 3rd-Rock moment where Curtin and the aliens crash a fan sci-fi convention, and Curtin's character smiles quaintly at one fan going by in a SNL Coneheads costume...

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9 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Thanks for the review of Kings Row, Swithin. I'm not much of a fan of soap operas but this highly dramatic, at times impassioned, presentation of Henry Bellamann's best seller about a small town and its dark secrets is a huge exception.

It was on a double bill with The Maze at the Film Forum, selected by Martin Scorsese and Jay C_ocks. The connection: William Cameron Menzies directed The Maze and designed Kings Row.

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Terrific observations about Kings Row which is one of my favorites.

I totally agree with the assessment of the Betty Field scene with Cummings.  Truly gut wrenching and heart breaking!

I do want to mention the breakdown that Louise Gordon has later, somewhat less dramatic than Cassie's, with Nancy Coleman giving a fine performance as she confronts her father, Charles Coburn.   

"I will tell!  I will tell! I will tell! I'll tell them!"

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Also JUST WATCHED (as GGGGerald put it):  😀

---

JoJo Dancer (Your Life Is Calling) (1986) - 👎

jo-jo-dancer-your-life-is-calling-f10815

Found this overlooked 80's footnote while searching Crackle to see if they had any real Columbia movies this month.  I wouldn't say that as streaming services go, Crackle is "the grindhouse of streaming" compared to Netflix, Hulu and Amazon--as that would be an insult to hardworking 70's grindhouses--but remember those theaters in the ghetto sections of the cities that would only play cheap action, martial arts and blaxploitation?

Here it was '86, Richard Pryor had cleaned up his act, and his private life, after recovering from his fire accident, and was now well into his 80's career of playing "safe", less-angry PG-rated whitebread-comedy poor-souls in "Superman III" and "Brewster's Millions".  And since all comics who come out of twelve-step feel they MUST do community-service by preaching in their acts that drugs and alcohol are bad and wrong and destroy lives, Pryor vanity-directs himself in a semi-autobiographical movie of a self-destructive comic who suffers a suspiciously similar drug-related burn accident and looks back at his life in a near-death experience.  It's a confessional he needed to tell, but the big problem with the movie is that he told us most of these stories already, and not under a pseudonym--Back in 1982's Live on the Sunset Strip, which may very well be "the Gimme Shelter of standup-concert movies" by which all others are judged.  The other problem is he told them better onstage:  His standup routines were harrowing and painfully funny by finding the absurdity and embarrassments in his downward spiral but here, the story veers between standard TV-movie biopic (which it would be if they'd cast another actor) and the constant need for penance and self-recrimination about his problems--Pryor's near-death alter-ego literally lectures himself on his own hospital bed, and even the climactic accident is depicted as almost a religious ritual of penance, rather than just the result of explosive chemicals.  When Pryor in LotSS told a story of his early days working in a gangster-owned strip club, it was frightening enough to make you wince; here, he not only re-enacts the story straight, but...in drag.  (As his character has just come out of a comic act of imitating the strippers.)  Er, loses something in the the telling somewhat.

The movie climaxes with Pryor's fictional character onstage re-enacting the confessional Sunset Strip concert, it's one of the only times we see him with his old energy, and it just emphasizes what we'd thought for the whole movie--Laughing at yourself is the only way you can confess a problem, self-pity isn't.  (The only real BTS revelation we get from the biopic is a scene depicting Pryor drunk and unmanageable on the shooting of 1981's Bustin' Loose, right before the edge of the cliff, and that may have been one of his funniest movies.  Which only emphasizes the tragic trade-off we had to take for his early comedy.)

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For fans of Kings Row, in the book "The Women of Warner Brothers"  (Daniel Bubbeo 2001) Nancy Coleman recalls the filming of her famous scene with Coburn where she confronts him and he slaps her:  It's a brief but powerful scene, but apparently was not easy to complete.

"Coburn couldn't remember my character's name in the movie.  He knew it began with an L.  He was quite elderly  then, so he had a hard time remembering lines.  He would get to the line and say "And I tell you Laraine or And I tell you Lucille and the slap always came up with the name.  If we played that scene once, we played it 40 times.  I was a wreck from it."

Jack Warner was terrifically pleased with the completed scene when he saw the rushes.  He even wrote to the associate produceer "Dailies last night of Nancy Coleman and Charles Coburn were excellent.  This is a great scene."

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47 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

For fans of Kings Row, in the book "The Women of Warner Brothers"  (Daniel Bubbeo 2001) Nancy Coleman recalls the filming of her famous scene with Coburn where she confronts him and he slaps her:  It's a brief but powerful scene, but apparently was not easy to complete.

"Coburn couldn't remember my character's name in the movie.  He knew it began with an L.  He was quite elderly  then, so he had a hard time remembering lines.  He would get to the line say "And I tell you Laraine or And I tell you Lucille and the slap always came up with the name.  If we played that scene once, we played it 40 times.  I was a wreck from it."

Jack Warner was terrifically pleased with the completed scene when he saw the rushes.  He even wrote to the associate produceer "Dailies last night of Nancy Coleman and Charles Coburn were excellent.  This is a great scene."

It certainly is a remarkably intense scene. James Wong Howe's photography even makes Coburn look Satanic to a degree, a reflection of his character's true self as a small town doctor who is also a sadist.

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21 hours ago, kingrat said:

Many thanks to Cinema International for posting those videos of the songs that lost to "Don't Worry, Be Happy." My vote would probably be for "Be Still My Beating Heart" edging out "Giving You the Best That I Got."

The real best song of 1988 ;)

(Seriously, it actually is from 1988.)

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Alternatively, I'd suggest these:

 

 

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Just now, Fedya said:

The real best song of 1988 :)

(Seriously, it actually is from 1988.)

Hehe, I admit i like that song (unpopular opinion). Maybe i should have also posted the 1988 song What Have I Done to Deserve This as the other nominees reaction to losing that night at the grammys.....

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Just now, Fedya said:

Alternatively, I'd suggest these:

 

 

Yeah, the Pet Shop Boys/Dusty Springfield number is one of the year's best, if not the best. It's delightful.

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Strait-Jacket (1964). Does anybody else think that Joan was rather good here, outstanding even? I admit I was quite bowled over. Not that I don't think she was good, she quit often good. But she didn't seem to have lost anything. Sometimes these revival appearances (can't be a called a comeback here, she was pretty much done) aging actors have lost something vital along the way and just seem kind of goofy. Not Joan. Diane Baker in a years-later interview seemed to like her although at one point she made some remark (if I understood it right) that Joan's age betrayed her at some point. During that segment of the interview they retained the voice over and cut to a soundless glimpse of Joan's character jawing away in anger. Okay, it gets a little campy but she had to show some range throughout and I thought she was downright sympathetic here and there and other times as in when she dons her old clothes as a person that seems nearly psychotic. She's great when she plays up to her daughter's fiancee. Or am I just easy. They should have put her in a picture where she plays a dual personality (or did they do that along the way.) Diane played a good-girl type though at one point she had a character reversal and had to do something completely different and nailed it. And that hired hand needs to be given a retrospective, honorary Oscar for the Nasty, Grubby, Greasy Award. I thought, this guy should have been cast all over the place for this kind of dude, he was so good. I looked him up and upon my word I discovered I had been looking at George Kennedy. Wow!

..

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48 minutes ago, laffite said:

Strait-Jacket (1964). Does anybody else think that Joan was rather good here, outstanding even? I admit I was quite bowled over. Not that I don't think she was good, she quit often good. But she didn't seem to have lost anything. Sometimes these revival appearances (can't be a called a comeback here, she was pretty much done) aging actors have lost something vital along the way and just seem kind of goofy. Not Joan. Diane Baker in a years-later interview seemed to like her although at one point she made some remark (if I understood it right) that Joan's age betrayed her at some point. During that segment of the interview they retained the voice over and cut to a soundless glimpse of Joan's character jawing away in anger. Okay, it gets a little campy but she had to show some range throughout and I thought she was downright sympathetic here and there and other times as in when she dons her old clothes as a person that seems nearly psychotic. She's great when she plays up to her daughter's fiancee. Or am I just easy. They should have put her in a picture where she plays a dual personality (or did they do that along the way.) Diane played a good-girl type though at one point she had a character reversal and had to do something completely different and nailed it. And that hired hand needs to be given a retrospective, honorary Oscar for the Nasty, Grubby, Greasy Award. I thought, this guy should have been cast all over the place for this kind of dude, he was so good. I looked him up and upon my word I discovered I had been looking at George Kennedy. Wow!

..

I thought the usually laid-back Diane Baker really got to strut her stuff in this movie.

Lafitte, it never mattered how old they got, those MGM contract stars like Joan Crawford, Clark Gable and Lana Turner always showed just how much they had learned during their long careers and how they never dropped their professionalism.

BTW-- In the beginning of the movie Joan cast such an old-time Hollywood spell on me that I found myself wondering what the devil Lee Majors was doing in a 1940s movie. LOL

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