speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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"Godzilla" (2014) movie took too long for Godzilla to fight the monsters.  What an ending, death by bad breath. :lol:

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2 minutes ago, hamradio said:

"Godzilla" (2014) movie took too long for Godzilla to fight the monsters.  What an ending, death by bad breath. :lol:

5332ec1213c6c548c7ce96984549193fb3a894ad

This is probably the sole Godzilla film I have yet to see too

I think it's TCM that had another great in-between & most interviewed seem to like the Japanese release the best. I know there were several but think they meant the 1st release after the 1956 Raymond Burr version

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On 9/15/2019 at 10:58 AM, laffite said:

Dracula (1931) Now that I have finally seen this film, the historians can close the book on its watching history. It can now be said that it  has been viewed by everyone in the world. I am generally anti-horror, anti-vampire, Anti-Frankenstein (and the like) in the extreme and did not think I would like this that much. But I was wrong. I DID like it. Expanding my horizons. Early on I was lamenting that the movie would have been so much better if they had waited a couple of years. As we all know, there is big, big difference between 1931 to, say, 1933. They had the appearance of trying to film a movie during a period where they didn't know much yet and therefore it was required that all participants give everything they had "if we're going to make this work." The actors (sorry, please see IMDB) who played Mina, Von Helsing, and Renfield were very solid (with the latter closing in on brilliant). Even not having seen this movie the piercing stare of Bela seemed to have been etched in my mind since birth and so that was very anti-climactic. But it was sure interesting to hear him speak. Early on in his Hollywood career he knew not a whit of English and had to sound out phonetically every utterance. I don't know how much he had progressed when the film was made but the intonation and pronunciation was weird enough to effectively add to the effect of his menacing person. His threatening gesture towards Von Helsing and his reactions to crosses, wolfsbanes, and mirrors were pure melodrama but managed to evoke the stature of well-done classical movements and thus avoid the notion of "corny." IMO.  

Didn't see, but have you seen 1922's silent Nosferatu or the 2000 version with Willem Dafoe-(another *Oscar nod.) in Shadow of a Vampire?

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1 minute ago, spence said:

This is probably the sole Godzilla film I have yet to see too

I think it's TCM that had another great in-between & most interviewed seem to like the Japanese release the best

Didn't miss much, Godzilla spent 90% of the time under water going from  point A to B and there is little of the battles we got accustom to. 

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On 9/15/2019 at 10:31 AM, laffite said:

Seconds (1966) Shades of Rod Serling and Franz Kafka right from the get go. The Bachannale sequence was jarring and disruptive. It was so 60s. I was actually, uh, grooving on the story until that. I liked the haunting expectation just prior. In retrospect it might have been seen as a foreshadowing of ole Tony waking up at the end after a bad trip. And a pretty bad trip it was. I had a mistaken notion throughout that the "company" was honing our hero for some grievous unnamed task or role that was to be proved distasteful to the extreme. I sincerely hope (and I believe to be so) that he is meeting his demise at the end and not being inserted into another body. Enough is enough. Reminds me of a New Yorker cartoon where a middle-aged couple are enjoying themselves sunning on a beach. "Well, here we are on vacation. We're still us." ////

Never yet got to see this entire film but Maltin says it's his best performance

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Just now, hamradio said:

Didn't miss much, Godzilla spent 90% of the time under water going from  point A to B and there is little of the battles we got accustom to. 

Better then the 1998 mediocre (**) version?

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They seem to keep going back to him nowadays don't they a fine thriller that can easily be found is Cloverfield  which kind of tapped into the same creature

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On 9/13/2019 at 12:00 PM, speedracer5 said:

I think I have this recorded as well.  I haven't watched it yet.  I really cannot remember anything remarkable about Robert Taylor, except 1) He was married to Barbara Stanwyck; and 2) Lucy Ricardo got him to autograph an orange (off screen) at the LA Farmer's market; and 3) His real name is Spangler Arlington Brugh.  What a name.

I love Audrey Totter and I also love movies that feature lots of rain--it makes me feel right at home.  Why wasn't Oregon used for noir? Portland would have been a great noir city! Lots of rain, bridges, trees. 

Herbert Marshall is one of my faves.  I didn't learn about his fake leg until the last couple of years or so--now I look for it when I see him in a film.  I love Marshall's voice.  Is it weird that I thought he was kind of cute in Trouble in Paradise ?

Even though it's from the UK what do you think of one of the best overall films I've ever seen (#11th) is The Third Man (l950) where it's always listed as a '49 release, yet won the Best B& W Cinematography *Oscar for 1950 & in a 1999 poll of critics-(it's reply to AFI obviously) BFI voted it the greatest British release yet made  I've asked Eddie Muller same  question a couple of times

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Didn't miss much, Godzilla spent 90% of the time under water going from  point A to B and there is little of the battles we got accustom to. 

While, as Honest Trailers pointed out, last summer's "Godzilla: King of the Monsters" sequel to the '14 film tried to overcompensate TOO far in the other direction, and still managed to underwhelm ("Because Godzilla-forbid we should see a monster fighting in broad daylight...")  😂 :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdAlV8zqTBw

 

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On 9/15/2019 at 10:42 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I still can't believe you had not seen this up until now.

in re: LUGOSI and PHONETICISM. I do not think it is on DVD...but you maybe can find it online, I HIGHLY recommend you check out THE 13TH CHAIR (1929)- directed by the same director of DRACULA and featuring LUGOSI in a major role- he is second-lead as a detective on a murder case. LUGOSI has lots of dialogue in it and it veru good speaking both English and French, so I personally think he knew ENGLISH quite well.

 

 

(get it now?)

Lorna, what am I supposed to get? I'm not lashing back here, just curious. What does the vid have to do with what you wrote above. Thanks.

I'm going to look for The 13th Chair.

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6 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

It Chapter Two

Clara Bow meets Marsha Mason? :lol:

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2 hours ago, Fedya said:

Clara Bow meets Marsha Mason? :lol:

Now THAT is something I would pay to see (even though i know it would be impossible, since Clara died before Marsha made her film debut)

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The biggest weakness in FRANKENSTEIN are the NUMEROUS plot holes- how does the mOnster know where the doctor lives or that he is getting married? Why does the little girl's father ASSUME she was MURDERED? (there's no evidence she was, etc.)

Yes, pretty glaring. I think it might have been enough in some cases that they realized that walking into a theater and watching moving picture with talking no less was still a novelty in its own right and enough to satisfy, especially if they got to see a monster wreaking havoc. They probably thought they didn't need to be too conscientious about the niceties of plot control. Still, is sticks out like a sore thumb to us today. 

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have, and while it has been quite some time since i did- I recall thinking not only is it reeeeeeally short (4 or 5 pages?) NOTHING HAPPENS IN IT. I would love to see the movie, but i imagine A LOT was added.

edit- went to wiki and checked, and according to them , THE DEAD is almost long enough to be a novella, so i guess i remembered that wrong...

They added very little. They had a guy recite a old poem at the evening gathering to set a certain mood. Perhaps a couple of other small things but I thought it was very faithful. It DOES have that NOTHING'S HAPPENING quality to it. It's amazing that only at the end we get what might be termed a BOMBSHELL although in this case it's only a reminiscence. But a very poignant one. Only then does all that time when "nothing was happening" was something happening after all. And it took a going back and re-watching to fully appreciate these things. I. for one, am not a perceptive enough viewer to get all the subtle points and symbolism on a first viewing. One problem is that it is sometimes difficult to realize what's important until you experience the end. It's kind of tricky.

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6SxI5XP.jpg

Room at the Top (1959) Lawrence Harvey, from a working class town, goes to the bigger city with a lean and hungry look, aiming to wive and thrive, setting his sights on a daughter of a rich man. There are obstacles but he seems to be getting somewhere when something happens, and what happens is that which is often referred to as that which makes fools of us all. Harvey looks a bit too clean and suave to be a working stiff and I thought he might have been miscast but the unfolding story made me forget such trifles. And besides, he does fine. One who is definitely not miscast is Simone Signoret, who gives a wonderfully natural performance. It's as if she threw off all the technique and just looked inside and found the better part of her real self and went with that. It's no wonder that someone might fall in love with her and ruin the whole plan. There are twist and turns, and there are gritty elements of power mongering, blackmail, backstreet hooliganism, betrayal, and greed. Amid all the fracas there is a relatively brief but compelling and moving love story. Well acted and completely engrossing.

If you want to avoid a BIG SPOILER, then don't do it .... !!!!!

 

The movie made a big mistake when they had him say "I killed her." He should have said, "I loved her." This of course was true and it would enhanced the love-story element and eschewed the sheer-guilt element. IMHO.

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The Trumpet Blows (1934)

Ridiculous yet mildly entertaining if only because of the miscasting of its lead players. Can you believe Adolphe Menjou as a notorious Mexican bandit living under an alias (his "real" character supposedly killed) and thumbing his nose at authorities? Yes, I said Adolphe Menjou as a Mexican. Yes, I said Adolphe Menjou as a bandit.

If that doesn't sound far fetched enough, how about George Raft as his kid brother educated in the States who returns to Mexico with the desire of becoming a matador? Raft has enough vaseline in his hair to have any mosquito landing in it slide off for a crash landing.

Of course Raft inconveniently falls in love with the same hot dancer (Frances Drake) that his big brother plans to marry. The two brothers have a fall out, with Drake leaving with Raft, but Raft, in becoming a top flight toreador (in a ridiculously brief amount of screen time) takes to drink because his courage at facing the bulls is not quite what he hoped it would be. There are a few overhead shots of bullfights, with plenty of rear screen projection whenever Raft appears with a cape in hand ready to face the bulls. Bull is right.

Sidney Toler is on the scene as a sidekick of Menjou's whose intellect is constantly under assault by the bandit (understandably so). Katherine DeMille is also around as a young senorita with whom Raft briefly dallies. At least she looks like she might be Mexican.

None of the cast make attempts at Mexican accents, which may be just as well, as they probably would have only made the proceedings worse if they had tried. Raft is much the same tough guy that he appears to be when cast as a Yank and looks a bit comical in his matador duds. Menjou is flamboyant and rather fun to watch even if you can't take him seriously as any kind of outlaw.

As for Frances Drake, on the other hand, this lady is sensationally sexy in this film. She gets to do a dance in a two piece outfit (apparently - the print I saw was so dark it was difficult to tell). But in closeups of her flashing eyes and smile and smoldering dark beauty, corny as the plot may be, it's certainly not difficult to believe that the lady could be a source of mutual attraction for any two brothers (or sisters).

ef5d63f41afeb0282e4f8fa0f6f04039--drake-

MV5BYTkyMmY3NjYtOTY4OC00YWVkLWI0OTktMTI0

2 out of 4

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44 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The Trumpet Blows (1934)

Sounds pretty much like the whole movie blows ...

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10 hours ago, laffite said:

Sounds pretty much like the whole movie blows ...

Except for Frances Drake (well, Menjou's kinda fun in the film, too).

I recall her playing virginal "good girl" types soon afterward in films like Mad Love and The Invisible Ray.

But, in the little remembered (perhaps justifiably) Trumpet Blows, she's Huba Huba.

Seriously.

George_Raft-Frances_Drake_in_The_Trumpet

original-film-title-the-trumpet-blows-en

Here's a shot of Raft surrounded by others concerned for him after a bad encounter with a bull. Raft is emoting here - I think.

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11 hours ago, laffite said:

Sounds pretty much like the whole movie blows ...

I knew someone would go for it!

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I just watched NOWHERE BOY on Showtime. It covers John Lennon as a teenager. It was really well done. John was always my favorite Beatle and the movie gives good insight into why he was such a complicated individual. While the film only briefly touches on the birth of the Fab Four, every Beatle fan should enjoy it.

UPDATE: Today TCM showed A HARD DAYS NIGHT. I hadn't seen it in years. I guess I got my "Beatle fix" this week.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

I knew someone would go for it!

;)Ah, so you had it but were gracious enough to cede the glory to another. How very kind of you. I guess I shouldn't expect a prize, then.;)

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On 9/15/2019 at 2:29 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

...and let us also do give some mention to WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935) which is second only to THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN is my favorite UNIVERSAL HORROR FILM.

Mrs. Whack and Mrs. Moncaster rock. 

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On my Ruth Chatterton pre-code binge, I took in Lady of Scandal (1930) on TCM On Demand last night.  Apparently, this was made when Hollywood learned how to talk but forgot how to make pictures.  This is an obviously filmed version of a stage play with extremely poor sound quality.  At times, there are echos, at others, lines are lost when actors turn their heads or are out of range of the mike.  Everytime Ruth walks down a hallway, it sounds like the calvary is coming.  My husband watched for a bit with me and said, "I guess all that stuff about the talkies in Singin' in the Rain was true."  The pace was stultifying.  I had to pause it to use the ladies', to which hubs remarked, "I think this thing has already been paused for an hour."  The only virtue was a young Basil Rathbone, with the crisp diction, thin as a whippet and very elegant in tux or tennis whites.  However, this film made me long for another trashy Warner's pre-code with the dialogue running a mile a minute and the heroine selling herself on the streets before the end of the first reel.

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