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I Just Watched...

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4 minutes ago, rosebette said:

On my Ruth Chatterton pre-code binge, I took in Lady of Scandal (1930) on TCM On Demand last night.  Apparently, this was made when Hollywood learned how to talk but forgot how to make pictures.  This is an obviously filmed version of a stage play with extremely poor sound quality.  At times, there are echos, at others, lines are lost when actors turn their heads or are out of range of the mike.  Everytime Ruth walks down a hallway, it sounds like the calvary is coming.  My husband watched for a bit with me and said, "I guess all that stuff about the talkies in Singin' in the Rain was true."  The pace was stultifying.  I had to pause it to use the ladies', to which hubs remarked, "I think this thing has already been paused for an hour."  The only virtue was a young Basil Rathbone, with the crisp diction, thin as a whippet and very elegant in tux or tennis whites.  However, this film made me long for another trashy Warner's pre-code with the dialogue running a mile a minute and the heroine selling herself on the streets before the end of the first reel.

 All this chatter about pre-code movies I think is a marketing scheme to get that the average person to think they're going to see something racy. There were some good ones. But for the most part they were just shot stage plays, Not very cinematic.  And what I really miss with a lot of them is that there's no musical soundtrack.

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Ruth Chatterton is incredible. I love her in Female (1933) and Dodsworth (1937).

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13 hours ago, laffite said:

Ruth Chatterton is incredible. I love her in Female (1933) and Dodsworth (1937).

Also something else in Frisco Jenny:

image.jpeg.493fb69bc3aeba0390f6b1f178710497.jpeg

 

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19 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 All this chatter about pre-code movies I think is a marketing scheme to get that the average person to think they're going to see something racy. There were some good ones. But for the most part they were just shot stage plays, Not very cinematic.  And what I really miss with a lot of them is that there's no musical soundtrack.

It's important to note that Lady of Scandal was an MGM product, so lacking the snappy direction and earthy quality of the Warners' precodes.  I think it was also one of the more pretentious studios, so they probably thought filming a stage play was approaching high art.  I love Ruth in all the Warners' flicks, and she's excellent in Dodsworth.  

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1 minute ago, rosebette said:

It's important to note that Lady of Scandal was an MGM product, so lacking the snappy direction and earthy quality of the Warners' precodes.  I think it was also one of the more pretentious studios, so they probably thought filming a stage play was approaching high art.  I love Ruth in all the Warners' flicks, and she's excellent in Dodsworth.  

The first one of these Ruth Chatterton films I saw was on TV in France years ago. I was impressed with "Female" and enjoyed it a lot.

At the time, I had all of these film books with  photos of Ruth Chatterton  but I had never seen her in a film. I couldn't help but wonder what  they were talking about in terms of her being an early talkies star. It certainly was an above average film.

But I got to say that George Brent really made it worth my while, he is one of my favorites. And he certainly had a long career as a leading man right up through the 40s.

And apparently he was a leading man to his leading ladies because he married at least two of them. It would have been three but you know how Bette was. LOL

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Poodle Springs (1998) Last Marlowe - Retro Tail Fin Noir

Poster%2BPoodle.jpg

I've always heard negative things about Poodle Springs.

Its BS... the negative comments. They are made by people who don't know what they are talking about. This film is a great addition to the Philip Marlowe detective film "universe." I like it better than Altman's unconventional The Long Goodbye.

Poodle Springs was the novel started by Raymond Chandler that was  unfinished at the time of his death. He knocked out a handful of chapters before kicking the bucket. It was eventually completed by Robert B. Parker. I've heard that some Chandler fans even refused to read it out "respect" for Raymond Candler. Hey! News Flash! It was the Chandler estate that requested that Parker finish the last Philip Marlowe novel.

Directed by Bob Rafelson (Five Easy Pieces (1970), Black Widow (1987), and The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981)). Excellent cinematography was by Stuart Dryburgh, and and beautiful score by Michael Small. The teleplay (it is an HBO film BTW) was written by Tom Stoppard based on the aforementioned book by Robert B. Parker and Raymond Chandler. Stoppard made some changes that work very well. He advanced the time period 3-4 years setting the tale within 19 days between November 3 and November 22 1963 the day of the Kennedy assassination, and that ending date could very well be called the end of what some like to think of as the conservative old school 50's and the dawning of the "Age of Aquarius."

The film stars James Caan as Philip Marlowe, Dina Meyer as Laura Parker-Marlowe, David Keith as Larry Victor/Charles Nichols. Joe Don Baker as P.J. Parker, Tom Bower as Lt. Arnie Burns, Julia Campbell as Miriam "Muffy" Blackstone-Nichols, Brian Cox as Clayton Blackstone, Nia Peeples as Angel, La Joy Far as Lola Faithful, Sam Vlahos as Eddie Garcia, and Mo Gallini as J.D.


James Caan is great as the aging Marlowe in a changing era. He makes this Marlowe just as believable as Mitchum did in the more traditional period piece Farewell My Lovely and in the updated and re-imagined The Big Sleep (1978) that had a contemporary 1978 Marlowe who had served in WWII and then resettled in the UK after the war. Once you get over the time and location change you find the plot follows the original story much better than the Bogart - Bacall version. Both of those films should be checked out if you haven't seen them.

Dina Meyer (Laura Parker) gives off a very Jackie Kennedy-ish vibe in the flick. She's smart and confident, she knows what she wants, a harbinger of the women's empowerment movement that's to come. Meyer and Caan are reminiscent of Bogie and Bacall. Meyer is stylish and believable.

Other cast standouts are David Keith, Tom Bower, Julia Campbell, Brian Cox, Nia Peeples, Sam Vlahos, and Michael Laskin.

Another standout for me in the film is the attention to detail in recreating 1963. From tobacciana -ashtrays, matchbooks, Camel cigarettes and table lighters, to Googie signage and architecture. Home interior are 60's chic. There is also a plethora of tail fin cars. Marlowe tools around in a 1957 Plymouth Plaza, Laura drives around in a turquoise 1959 Imperial Crown. Blackstone's goons drive a  1962 Cadillac Coupe DeVille, Krauss drove a 1962 Ford Thunderbird. Also making appearances are a 958 Chevrolet Bel Air Sport Coupe, a 1959 Cadillac Ambulance. a 1962 Cadillac Coupe DeVille, 1959 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special, and a 1960 Buick Invicta Convertible Coupe.

The film pretty much follows the novel with a few changes that make the story even more cynical. i.e. changing the time frame to 63 brings in a bit more of a gritty, decadent, sleazy, sixties feel to it all. Fuller review with screen caps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

Screenshots are from an online streamer. Could use a Bluray release 9/10.

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20 hours ago, laffite said:

Ruth Chatterton is incredible. I love her in Female (1933) and Dodsworth (1937).

Totally agree,my 2 favorite performances by her ,I discovered her about 10 years ago while watching Dodsworth for the 1st time,i always though she was British.In Dodsworth she is about 45 or 46,she looks fantastic with a stunning figure,with great tight fitting dresses,like she says she was worth an 'escapade'

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La Bandera 1935 Julien Duvivier with Jean Gabin in a star making performance,Annabella and a very good cast.A restored version very clean quite surprising for 1935! I wonder if it was showed in the USA... murderer flees France and join Spanish Foreign Legions before this Gabin goes to a transvestites-gay club in Spain,with a  real female naked dancer,goes to a whorehouse and goes to Morrocco with Legion,we discover a love street near the military quarters,a soldier gets a tattoo on his face that is a complete skull- zombie man 80 years ago,a very good movie 8/10

bandera.jpg

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le Doulos 1962 aka the Fingerman  Jean Pierre Melville excellent film Noir tribute with Jean Paul Belmodo,Serge Reggiani both excellent,great unpredictable storymEddie Mueller should present this in the TCM Imports or Noir Alley,a must for every Film Noir buff.8/10

doulos.jpg

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La Beauté du Diable 1949 by René Clair story of Faust with perfect performances by Michel Simon & Gerard Philippe.

René Clair gave us I married a Witch,another great fantasy-comedy,this one is top notch great special effects. 9/10

diable.jpg

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La Mort en ce Jardin AKA  Death in the Garden by Luis Bunuel 1956 very accessible film by Bunuel with great cast Simone Signoret,George Marchal Michel Piccoli and Charles Vanel, excellent cinematography,a bank robber flee through the jungle in South America with 3 others,the army is after them.8/10

bunuel.jpg

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Marlowe tools around in a 1957 Plymouth Plaza, Laura drives around in a turquoise 1959 Imperial Crown. Blackstone's goons drive a  1962 Cadillac Coupe DeVille, Krauss drove a 1962 Ford Thunderbird. Also making appearances are a 958 Chevrolet Bel Air Sport Coupe, a 1959 Cadillac Ambulance. a 1962 Cadillac Coupe DeVille, 1959 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special, and a 1960 Buick Invicta Convertible Coupe.

(snipped) Fuller review with screen caps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

How can it be "fuller"? Sounds like a police report sans plate numbers!

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22 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

How can it be "fuller"? Sounds like a police report sans plate numbers!

Dargo and a few other car enthusiasts may get a kick out of all the classic "tail fin" cars on display. 😅

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15 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

The first one of these Ruth Chatterton films I saw was on TV in France years ago. I was impressed with "Female" and enjoyed it a lot.

At the time, I had all of these film books with  photos of Ruth Chatterton  but I had never seen her in a film. I couldn't help but wonder what  they were talking about in terms of her being an early talkies star. It certainly was an above average film.

But I got to say that George Brent really made it worth my while, he is one of my favorites. And he certainly had a long career as a leading man right up through the 40s.

And apparently he was a leading man to his leading ladies because he married at least two of them. It would have been three but you know how Bette was. LOL

I hear ya! :D

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Contempt (1963)

Movie producer Jack Palance hires script doctor Michel Piccoli to fix his movie about Ulysses and the Odyssey.  Palance sees Piccoli's wife Brigitte Bardot and gets the hots for her.  Bardot thinks her husband isn't paying attention to her and using her to get Palance to reward him for the script.  They argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and go to Capri and argue and talk some more.

This is the sort of movie that leads a lot of people to think that foreign films are just pretentious arthouse stuff.  There are a lot of pretty images but the plot is a whole lot of nothing.

4/10

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1 hour ago, Fedya said:

Contempt (1963)

This is the sort of movie that leads a lot of people to think that foreign films are just pretentious arthouse stuff.  There are a lot of pretty images but the plot is a whole lot of nothing.

4/10

So you have contempt for it?

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Way Of The Gun (2000) Sort of a Tarantino wannabe that needed a better plot and some character development, all the gun battles got redundant then a bit unbelievable and ridiculous 6/10. 

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4 hours ago, Fedya said:

Contempt (1963)

Movie producer Jack Palance hires script doctor Michel Piccoli to fix his movie about Ulysses and the Odyssey.  Palance sees Piccoli's wife Brigitte Bardot and gets the hots for her.  Bardot thinks her husband isn't paying attention to her and using her to get Palance to reward him for the script.  They argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and go to Capri and argue and talk some more.

This is the sort of movie that leads a lot of people to think that foreign films are just pretentious arthouse stuff.  There are a lot of pretty images but the plot is a whole lot of nothing.

4/10

Agree never liked it even giving it a second go round once.

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5 hours ago, Fedya said:

Contempt (1963)

Movie producer Jack Palance hires script doctor Michel Piccoli to fix his movie about Ulysses and the Odyssey.  Palance sees Piccoli's wife Brigitte Bardot and gets the hots for her.  Bardot thinks her husband isn't paying attention to her and using her to get Palance to reward him for the script.  They argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and argue and talk and go to Capri and argue and talk some more.

This is the sort of movie that leads a lot of people to think that foreign films are just pretentious arthouse stuff.  There are a lot of pretty images but the plot is a whole lot of nothing.

That bad, is it? It's been a long time but I don't remember it being that bad. In fact, there is a lingering but vague notion somewhere deep inside I actually liked it. I won't issue a rebuttal until (and if) the film should perchance dance across my line of perception at some future time.

There is a detail, a sequence, a scene, or perhaps a set piece or something that I remember being super impressed by ... but I can't remember it. Lest someone should jump me on this, the non recollection is associated with my dormant memory banks and not the un-memorabilty of the film.

Seriously, does anyone remember what I might be referring to? It may have been an entire sequence of some kind, a very deliberate attempt to do something special? I'll check the synopsis and maybe that will jog my memory on this.

Remember this too, art house films are not always big on plot. They generally have one or a few postmodern qualities to them, especially during the years that this film was made, that tend to toss traditional conventions, like plot, narrative, logic, and other elements we have known and loved ... quite out of the window ... and still retain some or much appeal.

Oh, and this. How are many movies feature talk and argue talk and argue talk and argue ... Just about every film that has ever been made.

///

 

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From Wikipedia, this:

"Back at their apartment, Paul and Camille discuss the subtle uneasiness that has come between them in the first few hours of the project, and Camille suddenly announces to her bewildered husband that she no longer loves him." This is it. There was something very good about this. It was about in the middle of the film and perhaps can stand alone as a set piece. Still a little fuzzy in the mind though.

I wonder if any redemption can be had by the various protuderances that embellish the outer perimeters of Brigitte's body. If not, there are a whole host I'm sure, of boys, men, and a number of geezer's yet who have good red blood flowing through their veins who might disagree.

//

 

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58 minutes ago, laffite said:

There is a detail, a sequence, a scene, or perhaps a set piece or something that I remember being super impressed by ... but I can't remember it. Lest someone should jump me on this, the non recollection is associated with my dormant memory banks and not the un-memorabilty of the film.

Seriously, does anyone remember what I might be referring to? It may have been an entire sequence of some kind, a very deliberate attempt to do something special? I'll check the synopsis and maybe that will jog my memory on this.

 

It's not what you referred to in the other post but I loved how the torment of the relationship mirrored the depictions of the gods and goddesses in their film version of the Odyssey (shown through statues of the Gods and actors dressed up killing each other and shooting with arrows).

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“21 years.” (1942). British drama with Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh. Oliver, a young man in this, accidentally kills a man in a scuffle. He runs to his brother who is a high profile lawyer and in line for a judgeship for help. Olivier is as much a non-achiever as his brother is a consummate success. Olivier must play frightened and helpless and who cowers to his brother in these early scenes, and does not seem to do very will with it. A biographer said that Olivier was always best in costume dramas and Classical Plays because his elaborate garb in roles like this provided him with a means for getting and staying in character, and that simply wearing a business suit left him cold and struggling. So seems the case here. He is almost bad. Meantime a passer-by gets arrested for the murder providing much conflict among the principal players. Leigh doesn’t have a whole to do but she provides great window dressing and attracts much admiration. This movie is not to bad, but not to good either. But it’s watchable. It was made prior to GWTW and due to the colossal magnitude and success of the latter, was not released until two years later. Was Olivier’s character’s motivation due to needing to proving himself in some small way in the light of this brother’s success in life … or was it simply normal guilt?

///

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The Bowery (1933)

Don't look for  this jolly old movie to be shown on TCM for two reasons: for one, it's a Fox film; for another, it's filled with every ethnic epithet that ever graced the streets of NYC in the Gay Nineties. In fact, the opening shot is of the entrance to "N.....r Joe's," which was actually a saloon in 1890s New York.

The Bowery is a fictionalized account of two old New York characters: Chuck Connors (played by.Wallace Beery) and Steve Brodie (played by George Raft), two rivals for top man on the Bowery.  Connors was known as the Mayor of Chinatown; Brodie was famous for allegedly jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge and surviving. The film is in the mood of Mae West's She Done Him Wrong, filled with colorful characters, dialogue, and songs of the period, including a singing waiter who gives a pretty good performance of "My Dad's the Engineer." 

The film, directed by NYC native Raoul Walsh, whose style is evident throughout, also features Jackie Cooper, Fay Wray, and Pert Kelton, as well as a very young Charles Lane and the first screen appearance of Lucille Ball. Actors playing Carrie Nation and John L. Sullivan also grace the proceedings. The first quarter hour of the film is pure mood-setting bliss, with Kelton performing  "Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay" in Connors' raucous saloon:

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image?id=888650529776%26t=50%26plc=WEB%2

The movie ends with Raft, Cooper, and Beery marching off to fight in the Spanish-American War, as "Goodbye Dolly Gray" is played. The Bowery is pre-code, boisterous, sentimental, politically incorrect fun, with great performances by everyone in the large cast. And the film also features kittens and kitten poop!

 

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39 minutes ago, Swithin said:

The Bowery (1933)

Interesting that they let the chorus girls have a few meals once in awhile, giving an idea that pleasingly plump was considered a fine thing in woman back then. Not like today when we see skinny as rails a la twiggy-poo.

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