speedracer5

I Just Watched...

21,459 posts in this topic

45 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It's probably been a decade since I watched it, but I liked it at the time. 

Your description of Mads Mikkelsen looking like a gangster made me laugh (in a good way).

0000c8b5-500.jpg

The movie had an American remake released earlier this year, with the two leads played by Michelle Williams and Julianne Moore.

220px-After_the_Wedding_poster.jpg

Oh brother, I doubt I would like this one either. Do you notice the gender reversals? I was thinking, gosh Julianne Moore would be to old to play the wife. Well, she's the rich one (that makes her age a bit more realistic), and the one from India is a female. I read most of the review on RogerEbert dot com and he speaks of this one in a similar way of how I feel about the earlier one, in some of the details anyway. I like the way the reviewer pointed out how the ultra rich are wont to use their wealth and influence to control the lives of others. I wish I had said about the faux-Trumpy guy in my own post, although as you will remember his motives were revealed to be a bit more benevolent and well meaning with his machinations, much more IMO that anything the real DT is likely to do.

///

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not bothering to look it up at present but I remember Mikkelson in an historical drams about Denmark where he is able to assume control of the government during the reign of a King whose simple-mindedness is exploited by conservative demagogues. The simple one in this was rather well acted, I seem to remember.

///

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mummy (1932) First viewing. I'm trying to get with it and watch some vintage, classic, horror from the Golden Age. I have Dracula '31 and Frankenstein '35 and Bride of Frankensteing '35 under my belt but that's about it. Just to let you know that I don't know what I'm doing (no comments please).

This one seems relatively bland in comparison with those mentioned. Okay, let's say sober ... sounds better. Outside of a somewhat hairy-scary scene near the beginning when a mummy comes alive and scares some dude silly (his out-of-his-mind laugh is the most bizarre I've ever heard) it all settles down to some Egyptian psuedo (I presume) ancient history involving a mummy of an executed man who did something sacrilegious but who is still alive (or resurrected) due to an ancient scroll. Boris Karloff must have found his "incarnation" as Ardath Bey, a lot easier that Frankenstein. He's creepy but not particularly scary, or let's say not immediately dangerous to the public at large. He has his eye on a long lost love (very long lost) who he thinks is a young woman played by an actress named Zita Johan. According to him, she is really the Goddess Isis. He has this sort of Svengali talent of sending telepathic messages to her and she comes to him in a trance-like state. Miss Johan is a strange looking woman. I hated that dress she was wearing in the opening scenes. She has large rather beautiful eyes. She comes alive on screen near the end when she is being threatened with death by Mr Bey (he has an elaborate plan to kill her off, mummify her, and then bring her life somehow and then he will have his girlfriend again, something like that.) but it's not that which enlivens her ; it the outfit she is wearing (Isis?) that brings out some outward charms that give her an ooh-la-la aspect. I'm tempted to say something about her physical attributes but I'd better not because it is, not obscene or anything, but rather blatantly sexist. So it's a compliment that will go unsaid.

Was the studio a little worried about the rather staid teleplay? It's rather talky. Were any of the viewers in the theaters getting restive? There is such a conspicuous absence of scariness and deaths by monster. Does the gaunt figure of Boris walking slowly cut it? Occasionally a close-up of his face is shown, made up to look like something of werewolf (there is something kind of furry looking about his face). The funniest line was when the representative of the museum says, "The museum is committed to science, not loot." That might get a laugh from a modern audience.

I looked at Boris Karloff's filmography and see he has done a lot of things, including many silents. Have they ever get shown, or is the best question may be "Are they extant?" I guess these early horror movies are his legacy. I also remember him and his Tv-famous, "This is as thrill-ah."

I found the movie to be underwhelming, but I'm clearly not a good judge. How can I when I have a problem with the genre itself. But I'm trying.

//// 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We screened THE MUMMY '32 one Halloween and I noticed a lot of fidgeting among the audience telling me the story is slow, even dragging in some parts. I've seen the Universal original classics so many times on the big screen I could scream from boredom instead of fright. Next month we're screening Bride of Frankenstein which is one of the better ones (unintended comedic moments) but still pretty much a yawner after several viewings.

Nothing beats this version:

young-frankenstein-madeline-kahn-dance-y

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, EricJ said:

Actually, ALL the actors in the movie were asked to write their own songs--Keith Carradine got the Best Song Oscar for writing "I'm Easy" to wow Lily Tomlin with.  Which means Altman, as with most of his 70's movies, wasn't really doing a movie about Nashville or rightwing patriotism, so much as a movie about the struggling folks in the entertainment industry, three thousand miles away.

Still, it's nice to see the iconic "Freeway jam" scene before every quirky indie filmmaker copied it (ahemlalaland).  

Yes, true, Carradine deserved the Oscar for that, he also performed it himself at the ceremony. Karen Black wrote her own songs also. 

I saw "La La Land" but did not make a connection to the Freeway jam scene in "Nashville", but it is an interesting thing now that I think about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, laffite said:

The Mummy (1932) First viewing. I'm trying to get with it and watch some vintage, classic, horror from the Golden Age. I have Dracula '31 and Frankenstein '35 and Bride of Frankensteing '35 under my belt but that's about it.

This one seems relatively bland in comparison with those mentioned.

Boris Karloff must have found his "incarnation" as Ardath Bey, a lot easier that Frankenstein.

Zita Johan.it the outfit she is wearing (Isis?) that brings out some outward charms that give her an ooh-la-la aspect. I'm tempted to say something about her physical attributes but I'd better not because it is, not obscene or anything, but rather blatantly sexist.

Was the studio a little worried about the rather staid teleplay? It's rather talky. Were any of the viewers in the theaters getting restive? There is such a conspicuous absence of scariness and deaths by monster. Does the gaunt figure of Boris walking slowly cut it?

I found the movie to be underwhelming, but I'm clearly not a good judge. How can I when I have a problem with the genre itself. But I'm trying.

////

 

sigh, THE MUMMY (1932)

Yeah, this one has a lot of issues- in spite of some intriguing things about it (I love the opening credits with the scale model of the pyramids and the curious choice of SWAN LAKE [again!] by the makers)...THE MUMMY has also been given a PRISTINE RESTORATION by UNIVERSAL- really, it was THE LEAST they could do after that Tom Cruise thing- and it looks GREAT, i want to say the print has a slightly BLUE TINGE, but i can't say as i recall exactly.

However, none of that helps the fact that after a really terrific 15-20 minutes- WHEW DOES THIS ONE RUN OUT OF AIR!

KARLOFF'S MUMMY MAKE-UP was perhaps the best of all UNIVERSAL'S MAKE-UP ACHIEVEMENTS, but it is a galling fact that Karloff appeared as an actual mummy for all of (maybe) five minutes in one scene at the beginning, and for the rest of the movie, he just looks kind of like a somewhat sinister Used Camel Salesman.

there's also the fact that (in my opinion) EDWARD VAN SLOAN was a terrible actor, and DAVID MANNERS was not much better ALTHOUGH HE WAS REALLY PRETTY, SO, YOU KNOW...

There's nothing sexist about pointing out ZITA JOHANN was a fine piece of woman and she looks GREAT in those outfits- I REALLY RECOMMEND CHECKING OUT THE DVD DOCUMENTRAY UNIVERSAL DID FOR THE MUMMY- a film historian (Greg Mank?) talks about meeting her when she was in her 80's and all the stories she told him about the filming. The last time I watched THE MUMMY, I recall thinking that she seemed to be really struggling with her English and possibly even was performing the role phone net ickily.

KARL FREUND- the lighting and cinematography guy on DRACULA directed this and apprently his harassment of ZITA JOHAN was BAD- as a result, a lot of her scenes (including a lengthy reincarnation sequence) were cut and have been lost- these were re-done and included in the HAMMER 1959 REMAKE- which I kind of like.

HERE IS A SLIDESHOW OF STILLS OF THE DELETED SEQUENCE:

**NOTE- THE FIRST MINUTE OF THIS VIDEO IS A BIT ODD AND GOES OFF ON SOMETHING OF A TANGENT, BUT STICK WITH IT- THE SHOW STARTS ABOUT 1 MINUTE IN

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, laffite said:

The Mummy (1932) First viewing. I'm trying to get with it and watch some vintage, classic, horror from the Golden Age. I have Dracula '31 and Frankenstein '35 and Bride of Frankensteing '35 under my belt but that's about it. Just to let you know that I don't know what I'm doing (no comments please).

I think The Mummy is one of the great classics of horror film, with a great plot, script, characters, acting, mood, mythology, etc. Freund's style gives the film the feel of antiquity that was enhanced by early 1930s filmmaking techniques. The Mummy is a double romance as well, Karloff being quite touching in his declarations of love. One of my favorite lines is Zita Johann's to David Manners: "Do you have to open graves to find girls to fall in love with?"

The Mummy may have introduced into film the idea of gravediggers being killed, so as not to reveal a secret burial place. That was an actual practice. It was done later in history as well, to protect the secrecy surrounding the burial of Attila the Hun in 453 AD.

When I was very young, I audiotaped Bramwell Fletcher's hysteric laugh scene, which I think is one of the creepiest scenes ever shot. I would call people up and play it over the phone, without saying a word. Naturally that was before the days of caller iD!

12847233_1.jpg?v=8CF063215D5E4C0

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really, really do think that the inclusion of the deleted REINCARNATION SEQUENCE would've made the film even better.

(it's really worth watching for any of you who haven't seen it)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the 1932 version of The Mummy though it is a slow moving production and, in that respect, would be a test of endurance to modern audiences used to the fast edits seen with so many films today, in particular of the horror genre.

But Karl Freund's photography is terrific, assisting the film in no small way as being as highly atmospheric as it is.

But, for me, the most horrifying scene in the film is not the minute or so in which the Mummy opens his eyes and moves, but the flashback scene in which Imhotep is buried alive. In particular it's that shot of Karloff bound and helpless and we see the gauze being wrapped around his face that causes me a case of the shudders.

tumblr_mwoezvB42z1rdfgw4o8_r1_250.gif

giphy.gif

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

and the curious choice of SWAN LAKE [again!] by the makers)

I noticed that. I meant to say something. Very surprising that they would do that.

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

there's also the fact that (in my opinion) EDWARD VAN SLOAN was a terrible actor

I liked him in Dracula '31, especially the confrontation scene with Dracula. This is not saying he acted well, it's actually hard to tell. He doesn't do much but stare the man/beast down, but he comes across effectively in the scene. He has a fairly extensive filmography but I don't read a lot of discussion about him.

 

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

There's nothing sexist about pointing out ZITA JOHANN was a fine piece of woman and she looks GREAT in those outfits

Stated suchly, there is nothing wrong. I was going to emphasize a particular part of her anatomy that regardless how expressed might be seen as a boys-will-be-boys sort of crassness. There is even a touch of that in your comment above, if I may so say---nothing serious, I am not criticizing at all, but it almost sounds like man talk. Might a suggest "specimen" just to be safe. ;) Please, don't yell at me ;), I'm just trying to make a point. In fact, now that I am talking about it, I might as well have a go. I was going refer to Miss Johann's posterior as a "prominent derriere" which would have been a euphemism for what I would ordinarily have said in the company of like-minded men with good, red blood in their veins. If that is not so bad, going further and comparing that part of her with another part of her (North) that is a bit less prominent would probably crossing a line. With these comments Miss Johann has become a sex object, and that is still a no-no. I think.

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

KARL FREUND- the lighting and cinematography guy on DRACULA directed this and apprently his harassment of ZITA JOHAN was BAD

That's certainly not being a very good freund.

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

HERE IS A SLIDESHOW OF STILLS OF THE DELETED SEQUENCE:

Fascinating vid. Thanks.

////

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swithin said:

When I was very young, I audiotaped Bramwell Fletcher's hysteric laugh scene, which I think is one of the creepiest scenes ever shot. I would call people up and play it over the phone, without saying a word. Naturally that was before the days of caller iD!

 

 

In those same pre-caller ID days I used to call up people and play an audio recording of a scene out of Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein.

After someone answered the phone and said hello they would then hear my recording of Lon Chaney asking, "Hello, is this the McDougall House of Horrors?" They would then hear Lou Costello join in on the conversation, accompanied by the "Wolf Man" theme music as Chaney transformed into the creature.

"Fine thing," Costello says, "Man growls like a wolf."

Most just hung up the phone but I recall one woman, in particular, breaking up in laughter when she heard the recording.

I couldn't help but notice when I was young that few people ever congratulated me on my maturity.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, TomJH said:

But, for me, the most horrifying scene in the film is not the minute or so in which the Mummy opens his eyes and moves, but the flashback scene in which Imhotep is buried alive. In particular it's that shot of Karloff bound and helpless and we see the gauze being wrapped around his face that causes me a case of the shudders.

I agree and also his tongue had been cut out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I agree and also his tongue had been cut out!

giphy.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, laffite said:

I noticed that [THE SWAN LAKE THEME PLAYED]. I meant to say something. Very surprising that they would do that.

for many of us out there, the SWAN LAKE theme will always evoke classic horror- also this and DRACULA are the only two times UNIVERSAL used it. the only thing that the RESTORATION OF DRACULA done by Universal a few years ago did that I did not like was to "fix" the garbled quality of the soundtrack playing SWAN LAKE, I think the soundtrack inexplicably sped up in the version originally {even in it's release?} and they made it sound more normal and not so "ghostly" and "wobbly" as it was in the un-restored.

1 hour ago, laffite said:

I liked him in Dracula '31, especially the confrontation scene with Dracula. This is not saying he acted well, it's actually hard to tell. He doesn't do much but stare the man/beast down, but he comes across effectively in the scene. He has a fairly extensive filmography but I don't read a lot of discussion about him.

RE: EDWARD VAN SLOAN- He had a presence and a demeanor and a way of speaking, but more often than not, i come out of DRACULA 31 feeling that he is a weakness in the otherwise superlative cast 9save, bless his ADORABLE heart- DAVID MANNERS)

 ;) Please, don't yell at me ;),

oh no, I NEVER LEARNED TO PROPERLY USE THE SHIFT KEY and I hit the CAPS LOCK BUTTON a lot by accident. not shouting, PROMISE.

That's certainly not being a very good freund.

hee hee hee hee...that is pretty good.

Fascinating vid. Thanks.

WASN'T IT THOUGH? That was an A+ d***-move on FREUND'S part to have ZITA go through probably a week of 10 hour days and elaborate costumes (LOVE the three foot wig) and then CUT IT OUT even though I think the whole scene as written sounds like it could have been the highlight of the film.

////

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot this site existed here for a little bit, oops. 

Watched "Mallrats" and "Adventures of Milo and Otis" for my September Scavenger Hunt for my film club, and regretted making that decision. Next month, I'm picking more enjoyable movies; I have 15 movies to finish by the end of this week, and I don't think I can do it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

for many of us out there, the SWAN LAKE theme will always evoke classic horror- also this and DRACULA are the only two times UNIVERSAL used it. the only thing that the RESTORATION OF DRACULA done by Universal a few years ago did that I did not like was to "fix" the garbled quality of the soundtrack playing SWAN LAKE, I think the soundtrack inexplicably sped up in the version originally {even in it's release?} and they made it sound more normal and not so "ghostly" and "wobbly" as it was in the un-restored.

(Are we using Red bold because Black bold is too identifiable with....You-Know-Who?  😅)

1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I like the 1932 version of The Mummy though it is a slow moving production and, in that respect, would be a test of endurance to modern audiences are used to the fast edits seen with so many films today, in particular of the horror genre.

But, for me, the most horrifying scene in the film is not the minute or so in which the Mummy opens his eyes and moves, but the flashback scene in which Imhotep is buried alive. In particular it's that shot of Karloff bound and helpless and we see the gauze being wrapped around his face that causes me a case of the shudders.

It's hard for a lot of pop-cultural poseurs to realize the difference between Imhotep, of the Karloff era, and Kharis, of the Universal B-era.  That's probably why so many first-time Monsters watchers shrug off the Karloff movie and say "What was that??"

The Karloff movie is a good attempt to "create" another Lugosi Dracula out of made-up mythology and the still popular Egyptian trend, but like most pre-code Universals, it's better in creepy isolated MOMENTS than taken as a whole.  And I'd still take it over the too-in-love-with-themselves 90's Brendan Fraser movies, let alone Tom Cruise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I forgot this site existed here for a little bit, oops. 

Watched "Mallrats" and "Adventures of Milo and Otis" for my September Scavenger Hunt for my film club, and regretted making that decision. Next month, I'm picking more enjoyable movies; I have 15 movies to finish by the end of this week, and I don't think I can do it. 

I remember renting the VHS of Adventures of Milo and Otis when I was little.  I'm sure I was just interested in it because it had animals.  I cannot remember anything about this film. I don't think I've seen it since the late 80s.

I haven't seen Mallrats yet. I would watch it for Shannen Doherty, but I'm not really a fan of Kevin Smith's films. 

15 movies?! Is this for your film club? They're hardcore. Lol. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Adventures of Milo and Otis

I posted the trailer of this somewhere, not too long ago. LawrenceA said you don't want to know how it was made. The best part of the movie is the narration by Dudley Moore. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

oh no, I NEVER LEARNED TO PROPERLY USE THE SHIFT KEY and I hit the CAPS LOCK BUTTON a lot by accident. not shouting, PROMISE.

Oh no, I didn't mean that. I was referring to my comment about your comment (re Zita), thinking it might have perhaps irked you a tad and you might "yell at me" i.e. take me to task for my seeming criticism.

But yes, you do use CAPS more than usual but as far as I am concerned you are the only one I know who can get away with it, at least for me. It is so you to do that, and I mean that affectionately. You have a way of using them for emphasis that is totally effective and non-intrusive. And it is also an indication of your irrepressible enthusiasm. (There, that is my compliment for the day, don't hold your breath for the next one :P. )

///

///

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I remember renting the VHS of Adventures of Milo and Otis when I was little.  I'm sure I was just interested in it because it had animals.  I cannot remember anything about this film. I don't think I've seen it since the late 80s.

I haven't seen Mallrats yet. I would watch it for Shannen Doherty, but I'm not really a fan of Kevin Smith's films. 

15 movies?! Is this for your film club? They're hardcore. Lol. 

Someone comes up with 30 questions each month, and everyone's goal is to find a movie that answers each question so that the end result is watching one movie per day. I am very behind lol. 

And I love Shannen bc of "Charmed" and "Heathers," but even she couldn't save the movie... Jason Lee was VERY annoying in it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

for many of us out there, the SWAN LAKE theme will always evoke classic horror

They should have contacted me (never mind that I wasn't alive yet). I have the perfect opening  credits (beginning with the Universal plane). Give it about a minute (opening credits)

You may have endure some commercials at the outset:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, laffite said:

Oh no, I didn't mean that. I was referring to my comment about your comment (re Zita), thinking it might have perhaps irked you a tad and you might "yell at me" i.e. take me to task for my seeming criticism.

But yes, you do use CAPS more than usual but as far as I am concerned you are the only one I know who can get away with it, at least for me. It is so you to do that, and I mean that affectionately. You have a way of using them for emphasis that is totally effective and non-intrusive. And it is also an indication of your irrepressible enthusiasm. (There, that is my compliment for the day, don't hold your breath for the next one :P. )

THANK YOU VERY MUCH, I APPRECIATE IT.

From what the guy who interviewed ZITA JOHANN said in re: her answers to his interview questions, I THINK SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN HIGHLY FLATTERED BY EVERYTHING YOU WROTE. She also would have probably smacked me to the ground for making fun of her English, then picked me up and dusted me off and offered to buy me a drink. 

She seems to have been a pretty interesting woman....and KARL FREUND seems like a real HEEL)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The MAHLER would be good, but non sequitor and idiosyncratic as the music from SWAN LAKE may debateably be, I think SWAN LAKE is perfect for 1931 Dracula, it just fits the pace, the movement, the look...

i have absolutely no idea who made the choice, but after 90 years- it's an Essential part of the film, and cannot and should not be divorced from it (I'm still PEEVED Universal commissioned that DREADFUL PHILLIP GLASS SCORE for the DVD!!!!)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Dr. Somnambula said:

I posted the trailer of this somewhere, not too long ago. LawrenceA said you don't want to know how it was made. The best part of the movie is the narration by Dudley Moore. 

Since, technically, it was an imported Japanese movie, "Koneko Monogatari" (the then #1 all-time hit), in a country where you can actually MAKE movies about cute kittens and get away with it.  😕

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

then picked me up and dusted me off and offered to buy me a drink.

She coulda offered me a drink any time, even if it was Diet Coke. I would have had a chance to deliver my compliments in person.

10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

DREADFUL PHILLIP GLASS SCORE

I spot checked the score on the DVD which has this as a feature and there were instances throughout where it was not too bad ...

...BUT the score at the opening credits and a bit beyond was ATROCIOUS !!! (I hope you don't mind if a borrow a few of your CAPS), mainly because there was a repetitive sharp accent on the first note of each measure that was TOTALLY DISTRACTING. I couldn't believe my ears and I had one of those WHAT WERE THEY THINKING? momentS.  (Boy, using CAPS like that really gets you pumped up, doesn't it? I feel like running around the block a few times, whew!) :lol: .

///

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us