speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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I could have used that 'don't do coke in my bathroom' sign, back in the 80s,  but I would have added 'without me!'.

 

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49 minutes ago, laffite said:

Is Diet Pepsi okay?

Uh-huh.

 

 

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4 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

Hey, even the Nazis needed proctologists.

Maybe that’s why the surfer girl looks so worried. 

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Turn The Key Softly (1953) Woman's Noir

Poster.jpg


Directed entertainingly well by Jack Lee. A chick flick Noir.

Written by Lee and producer Maurice Cowan and based on the novel of the same name by John Brophy. It's the tale of the first 24 hours in the lives of three female prisoners released from Holloway Prison in London. The excellent cinematography was by Geoffrey Unsworth the music by was by Mischa Spoliansky

The film stars Yvonne Mitchell (Sapphire 1959), Joan Collins, Kathleen Harrison and Terence Morgan. Yvonne Mitchell is Monica Marsden the upper middle class gal pal of a second story man a burglar and safe cracker, She went to prison for not ratting him out and basically for something she didn't do. Joan Collins plays a "B" girl and maybe prostitute, Stella Jarvis, but it's never revealed in the film. She has a bus driver boyfriend who promises to marry her when she gets out. Kathleen Harrison plays the part of a sweet granny, Granny Quilliam, who is a sort of kleptomaniac shoplifter she reminds me a bit of Thelma Ritter's performance in Pickup On South Street. Granny's only true friend in life is her dog Johnny. Terrance Morgan is the suave safe cracker.

Some great action sequences during a rooftop chase. Wonderful images of 1950s London. 8/10

Turn The Key Softly is a part of  Great British Movies - Film Noir [DVD] along with 21 DaysSapphireSo Long At The Fair, and Turn the Key Softly. PS - You'll need a third party converted region free DVD player to watch these in the U.S.

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19 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

OH MY GOD HOW DARE YOU!!!!

Just kidding, I don't care about Jennifer Jason Leigh one way or the other.  I've liked her in some things (Fast Times at Ridgemont HighMiami Blues) but not in others. 

I never watched Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, although I recall renting it out regularly.

Do we really have flame wars around here? The most I ever see is one grumpy comment here or there, and that's usually from me, and it's either deleted by a Mod or I delete it myself.

I'm not coming back on this board until you change that creepy avatar. Yikes!

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1 hour ago, Janet0312 said:

I'm not coming back on this board until you change that creepy avatar. Yikes!

AppropriatePessimisticGrunion-size_restr

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44 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

AppropriatePessimisticGrunion-size_restr

It looks like a deranged Thomas the Tank Engine.

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2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

It looks like a deranged Thomas the Tank Engine.

Good grief, what is that thing? Reminds me of Grandfather Clock on the Captain Kangaroo show. That used to creep me out too. 

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Just now, Janet0312 said:

Good grief, what is that thing? Reminds me of Grandfather Clock on the Captain Kangaroo show. That used to creep me out too. 

I was thinking maybe Lawrence's avatar was a scary moon face? I was thinking of that really old movie from the early 1900s that features the moon with the face?

I never saw Captain Kangaroo.  Looking it up on Google it seems that the last episode aired six months after I was born.  However, I just googled the clock face and I agree that it's creepy.  

I used to watch the beginning of Mister Rogers, mostly to hear the song, see him put on his cardigan, and feed the fish. However, when he'd bring the Land of Make Believe puppets out, I was done.  I'd switch the channel to Batman: the Animated Series.  Those Land of Make Believe puppets were so creepy.

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5 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I was thinking maybe Lawrence's avatar was a scary moon face? I was thinking of that really old movie from the early 1900s that features the moon with the face?

I never saw Captain Kangaroo.  Looking it up on Google it seems that the last episode aired six months after I was born.  However, I just googled the clock face and I agree that it's creepy.  

I used to watch the beginning of Mister Rogers, mostly to hear the song, see him put on his cardigan, and feed the fish. However, when he'd bring the Land of Make Believe puppets out, I was done.  I'd switch the channel to Batman: the Animated Series.  Those Land of Make Believe puppets were so creepy.

Isn't it funny how we look back on these things and remember how they freaked us out

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Just now, Janet0312 said:

Isn't it funny how we look back on these things and remember how they freaked us out

With all the interest in Mister Rogers over the last few years, I've come across those puppets again and again.  They are still creepy. 35-year old me still agrees with 10-year old me. 

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17 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I was thinking maybe Lawrence's avatar was a scary moon face? I was thinking of that really old movie from the early 1900s that features the moon with the face?

That's a good guess. You're thinking of A Trip to the Moon (1902), directed by Georges Melies. My avatar is from Melies' earlier film The Astronomer's Dream (1898). Here's the whole film, running three and a half minutes:

 

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12 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

That's a good guess. You're thinking of A Trip to the Moon (1902), directed by Georges Melies. My avatar is from Melies' earlier film The Astronomer's Dream (1898). Here's the whole film, running three and a half minutes:

 

What is the meaning? The moon was once a dumpster? They throw everything in there but the kitchen sink.

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2 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

What is the meaning? The moon was once a dumpster? They throw everything in there but the kitchen sink.

I don't think there is a meaning. Setting aside that the title itself tells you it is a dream, Melies often was simply concerned with the visual aspect of film, and not with story or deeper meanings.

I just think it looks amusing.

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The Firm  (1989)  -  7/10

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British TV production, originally produced as an episode of the series Screen Two. Gary Oldman stars as the leader of a group of upscale soccer hooligans. Unlike the typical ruffians and pub thugs one thinks of, Oldman and his gang hold good jobs, dress nicely, and even have families that they are responsible for. The story depicts rising hostilities between Oldman's crew and another gang led by "Yeti" (Phil Davis), with the violence reaching absurd levels. Also featuring Lesley Manville as Oldman's wife (they were married in real life at the time), Andrew Wilde, Charles Lawson, and Patrick Murray. 

Director Alan Clarke (ScumMade in Britain) once again dwells on the effects of violence and the doomed souls that deal in it. Oldman is intense as usual, and Phil Davis, who I know mainly from Mike Leigh films, is effective as the preening blond antagonist. 

 

Elephant  (1989)  -  7/10

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A short film (39 minutes) made for British TV, by producer Danny Boyle and director Alan Clarke. The film is a series of brief sequences depicting men approaching and shooting other men. No reason is given, there is virtually no dialogue (only one or two unintelligible lines are said in the background of one scene), and none of the men shown are identified. It's meant to be an indictment on the senselessness of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland, where this was filmed. It can be taken that way, or as pure gun-violence porn. I wouldn't be surprised to find this among the viewing materials of spree shooters. However, there is an almost hypnotic quality about the film's aesthetic purity. Director Gus Van Sant would borrow the title and some of the film's visual style for his 2003 school-shooting film Elephant.

Source: Both on a Blue Underground DVD.

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Last night, I managed to tear myself away from '90210' and I watched a classic film featuring John Garfield.

They Made Me a Criminal (1939) Spoilers ahead.

In this film, John Garfield plays a successful boxer who implies that he's a mama's boy as a means to help his image in the boxing community.  After winning a bout, Garfield is at home celebrating with girlfriend Ann Sheridan and his manager.  Garfield and Sheridan are completely trashed and having a great time.  Sheridan then announces that she's invited another couple over, a newspaper reporter and his girlfriend "Budgie" (well I don't know if they were a couple, but they arrived together).  Budgie is trashed as well.  She starts carrying on with Garfield, wanting to box against him, and he is not interested.  Eventually Garfield's drunkeness causes him to disclose that his mama's boy act is all a gimmick that he uses for image purposes only.  The newspaper reporter announces that this little tidbit would make a great news story.  Garfield becomes irate and attempts to punch him, but doesn't.  Garfield's manager hits the newspaper reporter over the head with a whiskey bottle and kills him.  Everyone else in the room is drunk, the only other sober person is dead.  Garfield's manager decides to make it look like Garfield killed him.  He and Sheridan tuck Garfield into bed, and bail.  

The next scene shows Sheridan and the manager driving erratically in a car drinking a quart of liquor.  Which brings me to my first thought: Were open container laws and DUIs a thing in the late 1930s?  I cannot imagine the NYC police being okay with two people speeding down a dirt road openly drinking.  Anyway, since this is an old movie and people are driving erratically, it's obvious that they're going to crash and it's not going to be pretty.  Well they do, and it's not.  The car violently crashes into a tree and bursts into flames, killing the manager and Sheridan instantly.  The bodies are recovered from the car, neither person can be identified.  It seems that the manager swiped Garfield's watch while tucking him into bed (great guy, frames his client for murder, kills his girlfriend, and even steals his watch!).  Garfield's watch is the only thing that is recognizable that survives the fire.  The police identify the body as Garfield's and I guess make the assumption that the other body must be Sheridan.

Garfield sees the newspaper headlines inferring that he was responsible for the death of the newspaper reporter.  He is worried that he will be picked up for a murder that he didn't commit. Garfield ends up visiting another acquaintance to ask for advice.  The advice is that he's (Garfield) been declared dead, so he should run off, assume a new identity and start a new life elsewhere. Garfield then says that he's going to pull $10k out of the bank to live on, and the acquaintance volunteers to pick up the money for Garfield under the pretense that Garfield may be recognized at the bank.  Garfield agrees to allow this guy to pick up his money--which turns out to be a huge mistake.  The guy gives $250 to Garfield and takes the remaining  $9750 as his fee.  Garfield is justifiably very upset.

Next, we're treated to one of my favorite features in classic film--a closeup of a map with a line running across it, with a semi-translucent overlay of imagery showing the character traveling.  In this case, we're watching Garfield blow through his $250 as he travels across country.  His last $50 ends up being stolen at a bar.  Finally, he arrives in Arizona, penniless.  He meets two women who are boarding the Dead End Kids at their ranch.  The rest of the film deals with the younger of the women taking an immediate dislike to Garfield, the Dead End Kids taking an immediate liking to Garfield, and the older woman seemingly taking an immediate liking to Garfield.  Amongst all this action, NY police officer, Claude Rains has a hunch that Garfield is alive and seeks to find him as a means to prove himself to his fellow police officers.  It seems that Rains previously made a mistake that made him a bit of a joke to the rest of the police squad.

This brings me to my overall impressions of this film.  I love John Garfield. He was fantastic in this film.  He's really cute too so that is a bonus.  I really do not like the Dead End Kids.  I've seen them in multiple films now.  I do not get their appeal.  They aren't funny.  They aren't interesting.  None of them are even overwhelmingly attractive to make up for my lack of interest in their shenanigans. 

Claude Rains was weird in this film.  I just did not buy him as a NY cop.  I do buy him as a corrupt French cop. At first I thought he was trying to affect a NY accent.  Then it seemed like he wasn't affecting an accent.  Then it just seemed like he was talking weird.  Then by the end of the film, he just gave up and was speaking with his normal voice. I just did not like him in this film.  

I was very sad that Ann Sheridan's part was so small.  She should have traded places with the actress who plays the woman that Garfield meets in Arizona.  She should have easily played that part.  I liked her rapport with Garfield better than the other lady.

Overall, this film was okay.  Garfield was excellent.  Sheridan was great in the small part we saw her in.  Everything else was just meh. I would probably watch this film again, but I don't think it's anything that I would need to own. 

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The Great Lie (1941) ---Spoiler Below--- My first viewing. I really like Bette as a good girl. She was a charmer here and I love it. Has she ever been so sweet as this? Mary Astor is not sweet but she looks fabulous. Curious that her only other film in this year was The Maltese Falcon, in which she is often criticized for not being the looker that she might have been expected to be. I enjoy so much the first hour and a little less the rest. The plot gets sticky, and maybe even a little ugly. The trade off the two ladies make could be looked at with askance. I watched it just now and I am not remembering where Maggie gets all that money. Her end of the bargain would have required a fortune. Astor's Sandra Kovak is portrayed brilliantly in that sequence in that cabin in Arizona. Hattie MacDaniel is jaw-droppingly brilliant. Perfection. I like George Brent during these years, where we also see Ransom and Cantrell. He is good here as well. Here is another movie where he plays Bette's husband/paramour who is dead/believed dead that involves a child. He sure got old in just 18 months.. No wonder Bette asks, "Are you ill?" Sandra Kovack doesn't get what she really wants so she relents. But when all is said and done there is a loose end. Part of the great lie persists because there is something that Mr Van Allen was not told. /////

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I think Mary did her own piano playing  too. (to a playback probably) She could play the piano well.

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7 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Turn The Key Softly is a part of  Great British Movies - Film Noir [DVD] along with 21 DaysSapphireSo Long At The Fair, and Turn the Key Softly. PS - You'll need a third party converted region free DVD player to watch these in the U.S.

Sapphire is on a US-compatible DVD as part of Criterion's Basil Dearden set.

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

AppropriatePessimisticGrunion-size_restr

 

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What I like about The Great Lie is the gymnastics the writers have to do with the script to keep it on the right side of the Production Code. :lol:

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1 minute ago, Fedya said:

What I like about The Great Lie is the gymnastics the writers have to do with the script to keep it on the right side of the Production Code. :lol:

Great point;  it is all in the timing of what-occurs-when.

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19 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Sapphire is on a US-compatible DVD as part of Criterion's Basil Dearden set.

The So Long At The Fair was re worked for season one of Alfred Hitchcock Presents in 1955, under the title Into Thin Air. It's not very Noir visually and relies more on it's strange perplexing story.

The show starred Hitchcock's daughter, Patricia. The change to the plot was that the girl arrived in Paris with her mother instead of her brother. 

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3 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The So Long At The Fair was re worked for season one of Alfred Hitchcock Presents in 1955, under the title Into Thin Air.

Did you hear about the man who went for a walk in the London fog and was never seen again?

He disappeared into thick air.

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