speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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Does anybody here collect all  THE LEGENS OF HOLLYWOOD STAMPS? I've furiously written this before but *The Great: Tracy  is the sole old out  I'm positive collectors of that marvelous series-(I only have 13 td & framed on my own WALLS-OF-FAME)  probably searched for *Tracy's to add to the collection & he's mysteriously absent  Reason being is own grandson mixed-0n when they were actually announcing 2 prototypes pf a stamp for him , one was perfecto from Boys Town & the other not so much-(even the Tracy's agreed, Cyndi in particular) from '49's ok (**12) Edward, My son  But Joe TRACY had to push his own prototype &he's always been more then obnoxious-(actually sounded like my dad on the phone & was also a marine during Desert Strom) was so obnoxious they chucked the lot as the limey folks say

The govt was wrong & shoulda went 4th no matter with his own stamp Maybe now that every single other Golden Age heavyweight has one they will come out with them (NOTE: Amazon has all of them by the way) I was lucky enough to get my 13 at actual local post office, they don't do it anymore, due to the net  *Bogart, *Davis, Universal Horror Actors, J.D., Marilyn, *Cagney-(also got a couple of Mr. Dynamites due to being my own mum's fav ever!), ,  Edward G. & to my delighted surprise one day in May of 08 the post office dedicated an entire wall to *Francis Albert Sinatra on anniversary of his demise on May 14th, 1998.  Needles to say I had a field day getting as much as I could $afford$ Of course no *JW then as yet.   AGAIN, CHECK OUT ALL ON AMAZON, though don't know if you can just pay for say 1 Garbo or *Kate Hepburn, but a book?  My goal was (l998/99) to get then them all

 

THANKS FOR YOU KIND ATTENTION

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Asked this before but no reply-(by the way good shot of Errol, how young)  don't know where you live sppedracer5, but if you ever can go to Glendale & Mulhooland, Dr & check out his grave & fmr house  It was also used for location in a few movies-(mostly burned down now, but some left for now)  1994's rarely known of comedy w/*Pesci Jimmy Hollywood being just one & 1983's Breathless remake with Richard Gere another, there are more

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Just saw few days ago 1981's good (strong ***-0out if 4 stars) many critics give it 3 & 1/2   Absence of Malice with *Newman & *Sally Field   An Oscar contender as usual for *Paul again & Melinda Dillon-(support)  I bet many have already seen this one, for me it's been yrs 1st caught it in a theatre Christmas 1981 in NJ   Another film about Journalism of course (All the President's Men the obvious mt. summit)   Wilford Brimley-(just now age 85, where is nobody would believe me back with 1985's Cocoon when I said he was only 50, *Ameche for example was 26yrs older!  Sadly, only got to see the three old guys chairs when on that set, they were likely doing sequences down the rd where most was filmed at another Retirement Villaqe

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Who else has Brighthouse/Spectrum's on Demand by the way?  They rotate it's smaller than most channels stuff  CNN on Demand still has it's *Tom Hanks produced epic THE MOVIES on there  Not a great docu but still very good (3 & 1/2) Musta watched THE GOLDEN AGE PART 15 times so far

For those interested go to networks & scroll until you hit TCM & currently have on *Best Years of 0ur Lives, Absence , Running on Empty, Bride of Frankenstein-(Premiere once voted that #1 horror pic),  Spartacus-(musta hadthat on longer then any other now), The Mummy, Bell book & Candle, Palm Beach Story, Lady Eve-(just marvelous!) & had 1990's terrific The Freshman (***1/2)only hit $16m though? & the all-time great from 1951 & Robert Osborne's fav picture A Place in the Sun, but as I said they rotate quickly

 

 

THANX AGAIN SPORTS FANS

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22 hours ago, Hibi said:

 

I heard they downplayed his homosexuality in the film, how was it handled?

Re: Freddy Mercury in Bohemian Rhapsody '18-

I thought pretty realistically portrayed. Mercury was kind of bi-sexual in that he only was attracted to those who were attracted to him. So a lot of implied shots of men gazing at him back stage, his confused then intrigued response forming relationships that led to intimacy. There were only two scenes of men spontaneously kissing him, no sex scenes, thankfully. I was watching with my Mom and I'm glad it was kept minimal & implied. 

I'm not so hopeful about ROCKETMAN, because I know Elton's early experiences were similar to Mercury's.... touring and fame at a young age can be isolating and very confusing as to who your real friends are. I'll watch Rocketman alone first and will only share it with my Mom if it's not too graphic. 

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13 hours ago, spence said:

Asked this before but no reply ...

You may not get a reply once in awhile but you sure have become enBOLEDen of late.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

You may not get a reply once in awhile but you sure have become enBOLEDen of late.

And thankfully, it was another poster, not me, who pointed out "Begging for replies is not cool."

(Frankly, begging from total strangers for anything as if they were your imagined best friends is not cool.  Try it on a streetcorner sometime, and see.)

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The Wolf Man (1941)

The 1941 production that gave rise to the popularity of the last of the big Universal Studio monsters, this lycanthropy based tale of pentagrams, gypsies and a man turning into a wolf during the full moon remains one of the best films of the horror genre to be produced by the studio, certainly during the 1940s.

Of course the legend of man turning into beast had been approached by the studio six years before with Werewolf of London, with largely the same theme and a much more subtle monster makeup. Werewolf is interesting in a curiosity piece sort of way, in my opinion, but it's not in the same league as The Wolf Man. The 1941 film boasts one of the best casts of any film in the Universal horror canon, as well as an outstanding musical score credited to three composers, Hans Salter, Frank Skinner and Charles Previn. And, of course, very much a star of the film, too, is the Wolf Man makeup of Jack Pierce.

Lon Chaney Jr. stars in his most famous role as Larry Talbot, the son of landowning gentry in this fantasy European set film (one source claimed the setting to be Wales, though there is nothing in the film to confirm that). One thing for sure, though, it certainly is fog bound, particularly at night

Talbot returns home for the first time in years, following the hunting accident death of his brother, to be enchanted by a pretty villager (Evelyn Ankers) he courts, soon afterward bitten by a strange "wolf" he kills at night as the animal slays a woman. When the dead wolf turns out to be a gypsy and the word soon spreads that the gypsy was, in fact, a werewolf, Talbot, initially cynical of the lycanthropic legend, gradually becomes obsessed with the thought that he may turn into a wolf himself at night.

The cast, as I stated earlier, is a highly distinguished one, including Claude Rains as Talbot's landlord father, Warren William as a doctor, Ralph Bellamy as the pipe smoking police inspector, Patric Knowles as Anker's fiance, Bela Lugosi (giving a nicely understated performance) as the gypsy werewolf and, most memorably, Maria Ouspenskaya as Maleva, the old gypsy woman and mother of Bela, who feels protective towards Talbot once she sees that he is cursed with the same affliction which had lead to her son's doom.

No fewer than four cast members, starting with Evelyn Ankers, get the opportunity to cite the film's legendary line of monster lore: "Even a man who's pure at heart and says his prayers at night may become a wolf when the wolf bane blooms and the moon is full and bright."

It's Ouspenskaya, however, who has one of her most famous lines she spouts several times in the film, including, thanks to her, at the film's strangely touching ending, "The way you walk was thorny, through no fault of your own . . ."

Chaney always called the Wolf Man his favourite horror role. A large part of that was because he was the only actor at Universal to play the part and the role of Talbot/the Wolf Man was his and his alone. There is also, of course, as with many of the great movie monsters, a built in audience sympathy for any man cursed with such a fate through no fault of his own.

And, having grown up watching this film and others in the Wolf Man Universal series, to this day I can never glimpse a full moon without a passing nostalgia filled thought about Lon Chaney Jr..

*

3 out of 4

P.S.: The influence of German expressionism on Universal's horror films really appears in that Wolf Man gif, doesn't it?

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Josephine and Men 1955 produced by John Boulting directed by his brother Roy Boulting.I do not know if it was ever shown on TCM.Nice British romantic comedy with very good cast:Glynis Johns,Peter Finch and  a very funny performance by Jack Buchanan.Awesome Technicolor by Gilbert Taylor,Glynis Johns is very beautiful in the pastels of Technicolor. 7/10

josep.jpg

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14 hours ago, TomJH said:

P.S.: The influence of German expressionism on Universal's horror films really appears in that Wolf Man gif, doesn't it?

The cinema photography is what elevates this film as "great" for me. The performances, sets, writing all vary from good to great, but it's the "look" and atmosphere created that leaves an impression in your psyche long after.

The more Ouspenskaya, the better the movie.

ouspenskaya.png

That's me in 20 years. She's the spitting image of those on my Hungarian side of the family-who were distantly related to Bela Lugosi.

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45 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

The cinema photography is what elevates this film as "great" for me. The performances, sets, writing all vary from good to great, but it's the "look" and atmosphere created that leaves an impression in your psyche long after.

The more Ouspenskaya, the better the movie.

ouspenskaya.png

That's me in 20 years. She's the spitting image of those on my Hungarian side of the family-who were distantly related to Bela Lugosi.

tikisoo, did you know how awful she died by the way?  She was up for an Oscar for 1939's Love Affair

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54 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

ouspenskaya.png

That's me in 20 years. She's the spitting image of those on my Hungarian side of the family-who were distantly related to Bela Lugosi.

But will you be telling fortunes?

16001509332_74e4871391_b.jpg

"I see that you will marry a blonde actor and eventually move to Hawaii with him."

Evelyn Ankers was co-starred with Lon Chaney a few times at Universal (one of the more interesting times being in 1943's Weird Woman, part of the Inner Sanctum series, with Ankers having one of her best screen opportunities as a manipulative schemer). The actress didn't much enjoy the experience of working with Chaney, though.

I always think that one of the more bizarre moments in The Wolf Man is when Larry Talbot, in trying to win over Gwynne, Ankers' character, tells her that he first saw her by spying upon her in her bedroom with a telescope (of course in the movie she's fully clothed at the time). Gwynne passes off the comment. Somehow I can't see a confession like that doing wonders for guys in the courting department in the real world.

 

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a few I kinda just watched again on spectrum's cable on demand again  Keep asking dies anyone also have it, but no answer?

 

I was also simultaneouly busy when they were on, but seen them several times before

The Pink Panther (l964) Meant as a James bond type of franchise for *David Niven, but obviously the genius Peter sellers had other ideas  Great opening montage & that nommed score by *Henry Mancini (strong (***1/2-out of 4 stars) (P.S. sellers is always listed among Hollywoods most difficult stars, likely main reason his awful heart all his life)  I UNDERSTAND  unquote

Bride of Frankenstein (l935 Universal) all by now saw this classic, better than the '31 original I think anyway  Main reason that score by Franz Waxman & the humor injected Karloff literally hated playing the monster because of the painful make-up, reason why he only did 3 Premiere magazine (l987-2002) once conducted it's own in house poll/survey of several genre's & for Horror it voted this as 1st ever made, around 1993 or so) (****-stars!) People don't realize a couple Karloff things  He hung outwith Hollywoods Irish Mafi though a lime

15 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Wolf Man (1941)

The 1941 production that gave rise to the popularity of the last of the big Universal Studio monsters, this lycanthropy based tale of pentagrams, gypsies and a man turning into a wolf during the full moon remains one of the best films of the horror genre to be produced by the studio, certainly during the 1940s.

Of course the legend of man turning into beast had been approached by the studio six years before with Werewolf of London, with largely the same theme and a much more subtle monster makeup. Werewolf is interesting in a curiosity piece sort of way, in my opinion, but it's not in the same league as The Wolf Man. The 1941 film boasts one of the best casts of any film in the Universal horror canon, as well as an outstanding musical score credited to three composers, Hans Salter, Frank Skinner and Charles Previn. And, of course, very much a star of the film, too, is the Wolf Man makeup of Jack Pierce.

Lon Chaney Jr. stars in his most famous role as Larry Talbot, the son of landowning gentry in this fantasy European set film (one source claimed the setting to be Wales, though there is nothing in the film to confirm that). One thing for sure, though, it certainly is fog bound, particularly at night

Talbot returns home for the first time in years, following the hunting accident death of his brother, to be enchanted by a pretty villager (Evelyn Ankers) he courts, soon afterward bitten by a strange "wolf" he kills at night as the animal slays a woman. When the dead wolf turns out to be a gypsy and the word soon spreads that the gypsy was, in fact, a werewolf, Talbot, initially cynical of the lycanthropic legend, gradually becomes obsessed with the thought that he may turn into a wolf himself at night.

The cast, as I stated earlier, is a highly distinguished one, including Claude Rains as Talbot's landlord father, Warren William as a doctor, Ralph Bellamy as the pipe smoking police inspector, Patric Knowles as Anker's fiance, Bela Lugosi (giving a nicely understated performance) as the gypsy werewolf and, most memorably, Maria Ouspenskaya as Maleva, the old gypsy woman and mother of Bela, who feels protective towards Talbot once she sees that he is cursed with the same affliction which had lead to her son's doom.

No fewer than four cast members, starting with Evelyn Ankers, get the opportunity to cite the film's legendary line of monster lore: "Even a man who's pure at heart and says his prayers at night may become a wolf when the wolf bane blooms and the moon is full and bright."

It's Ouspenskaya, however, who has one of her most famous lines she spouts several times in the film, including, thanks to her, at the film's strangely touching ending, "The way you walk was thorny, through no fault of your own . . ."

Chaney always called the Wolf Man his favourite horror role. A large part of that was because he was the only actor at Universal to play the part and the role of Talbot/the Wolf Man was his and his alone. There is also, of course, as with many of the great movie monsters, a built in audience sympathy for any man cursed with such a fate through no fault of his own.

And, having grown up watching this film and others in the Wolf Man Universal series, to this day I can never glimpse a full moon without a passing nostalgia filled thought about Lon Chaney Jr..

*

3 out of 4

P.S.: The influence of German expressionism on Universal's horror films really appears in that Wolf Man gif, doesn't it?

y & was a very strng actor, see 1945's Body-Snatcher)

Glengarry Glen ross was on HBO again & Ill always say it, *Jack Lemmon delivered the performance of his life as Shelley "The Machine" Levine, but wasn't even nominated, though *Pacinowas for support-(there goes the Academy again) (ALERT: It's do9ng it again, only on here, eating the wrds/deleting them,etc) Alec Baldwinwas superb in a cameo not in the Mamet play  Only grossd $11m. (strong 3 & 1/2)

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Wolf Man (1941)

The 1941 production that gave rise to the popularity of the last of the big Universal Studio monsters, this lycanthropy based tale of pentagrams, gypsies and a man turning into a wolf during the full moon remains one of the best films of the horror genre to be produced by the studio, certainly during the 1940s.

Of course the legend of man turning into beast had been approached by the studio six years before with Werewolf of London, with largely the same theme and a much more subtle monster makeup. Werewolf is interesting in a curiosity piece sort of way, in my opinion, but it's not in the same league as The Wolf Man. The 1941 film boasts one of the best casts of any film in the Universal horror canon, as well as an outstanding musical score credited to three composers, Hans Salter, Frank Skinner and Charles Previn. And, of course, very much a star of the film, too, is the Wolf Man makeup of Jack Pierce.

Lon Chaney Jr. stars in his most famous role as Larry Talbot, the son of landowning gentry in this fantasy European set film (one source claimed the setting to be Wales, though there is nothing in the film to confirm that). One thing for sure, though, it certainly is fog bound, particularly at night

Talbot returns home for the first time in years, following the hunting accident death of his brother, to be enchanted by a pretty villager (Evelyn Ankers) he courts, soon afterward bitten by a strange "wolf" he kills at night as the animal slays a woman. When the dead wolf turns out to be a gypsy and the word soon spreads that the gypsy was, in fact, a werewolf, Talbot, initially cynical of the lycanthropic legend, gradually becomes obsessed with the thought that he may turn into a wolf himself at night.

The cast, as I stated earlier, is a highly distinguished one, including Claude Rains as Talbot's landlord father, Warren William as a doctor, Ralph Bellamy as the pipe smoking police inspector, Patric Knowles as Anker's fiance, Bela Lugosi (giving a nicely understated performance) as the gypsy werewolf and, most memorably, Maria Ouspenskaya as Maleva, the old gypsy woman and mother of Bela, who feels protective towards Talbot once she sees that he is cursed with the same affliction which had lead to her son's doom.

No fewer than four cast members, starting with Evelyn Ankers, get the opportunity to cite the film's legendary line of monster lore: "Even a man who's pure at heart and says his prayers at night may become a wolf when the wolf bane blooms and the moon is full and bright."

It's Ouspenskaya, however, who has one of her most famous lines she spouts several times in the film, including, thanks to her, at the film's strangely touching ending, "The way you walk was thorny, through no fault of your own . . ."

Chaney always called the Wolf Man his favourite horror role. A large part of that was because he was the only actor at Universal to play the part and the role of Talbot/the Wolf Man was his and his alone. There is also, of course, as with many of the great movie monsters, a built in audience sympathy for any man cursed with such a fate through no fault of his own.

And, having grown up watching this film and others in the Wolf Man Universal series, to this day I can never glimpse a full moon without a passing nostalgia filled thought about Lon Chaney Jr..

*

3 out of 4

P.S.: The influence of German expressionism on Universal's horror films really appears in that Wolf Man gif, doesn't it?

ALRIGHT! as I said just love it wen people put the clips on here!  ANY OF BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK, SOME CAME RUNNING ORINSIDE DAISY COVER OUT THERE???

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To the eduiting team,y last post did not post entirely, what happened?

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On 10/5/2019 at 8:17 AM, TikiSoo said:

Re: Freddy Mercury in Bohemian Rhapsody '18-

I thought pretty realistically portrayed. Mercury was kind of bi-sexual in that he only was attracted to those who were attracted to him. So a lot of implied shots of men gazing at him back stage, his confused then intrigued response forming relationships that led to intimacy. There were only two scenes of men spontaneously kissing him, no sex scenes, thankfully. I was watching with my Mom and I'm glad it was kept minimal & implied. 

I'm not so hopeful about ROCKETMAN, because I know Elton's early experiences were similar to Mercury's.... touring and fame at a young age can be isolating and very confusing as to who your real friends are. I'll watch Rocketman alone first and will only share it with my Mom if it's not too graphic. 

TikiSoo, did you happen to see all of B. Rhapsody?  It did play done his homosexuality & lack of drug use is shown most of the way through  Still he deserved his Best Actor Gold as Mercury.  Saw it on HB0about 2 months ago & overall very good (***1/2) not among the great bio's though & a massive $hit$ at abiot $245m. domestically alone

also won Academy awards fir sound, Sound effects & Film editing (AGAIN, EXCUSE ERRIRS, It'S THE FORUMS AGAIN)

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24 minutes ago, TomJH said:

But will you be telling fortunes?

16001509332_74e4871391_b.jpg

"I see that you will marry a blonde actor and eventually move to Hawaii with him."

Evelyn Ankers was co-starred with Lon Chaney a few times at Universal (one of the more interesting times being in 1943's Weird Woman, part of the Inner Sanctum series, with Ankers having one of her best screen opportunities as a manipulative schemer). The actress didn't much enjoy the experience of working with Chaney, though.

I always think that one of the more bizarre moments in The Wolf Man is when Larry Talbot, in trying to win over Gwynne, Ankers' character, tells her that he first saw her by spying upon her in her bedroom with a telescope (of course in the movie she's fully clothed at the time). Gwynne passes off the comment. Somehow I can't see a confession like that doing wonders for guys in the courting department in the real world.

 

Asa kid The wolfman was by far the scariest of the Universal Monsters  Jack Pierce dserved a special statuette for it's make up & string score again

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& Lon Chaney, Jr (l906-l973) could be a fine actor besides  See High Noon, Defiant 0nes & of course the legendary 1939 Of Mice and Men  (P.S. who saw the 1992 remake with Malkovich& Gary Sinise? Plus there was a good tv movie with Robert Blake and Randy Quaid)

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Also just saw 1935's British classic from Hitchcock The 39 Steps & stronglysplit with Leonard Maltin(usually agree with him) He ranks it his 5th all-time favorite motion picture I thought it very god (3 & 1/2)ut not in same league as a Vertigo, Rear window, North by Northwest,etc   To each his own of course!  poor *Robert Donat-l905-58)suffered al his life from huge lung troubles, reason he only made it to sage 53

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Once A Thief ( Les Tueurs de San Francisco) (1965) San Francisco Beat/Transitional Noir

44ba1541b71650e006e3f57bba6a00fb.jpg

It takes more than one watch and helps to have quite a few noir under your belt.

Once A Thief is familiar and yet a bit different. Think of the Classic Film Noir Crime Wave (1953). In Crime Wave Gene Nelson plays an ex con trying to go straight. He's on parole works as an airplane mechanic, has a loving wife Phyllis Kirk,  and drives a hot rod-ed out 1930 Ford Model A.

Some barbed wire hotel buddies of his break out of the slammer and go on a crime spree through California heading South. The gang of crooks is led by suave Ted de Corsia, and they persuade Nelson to help them out by holding his wife hostage while he drive both their bank robbery getaway car but also by flying a getaway plane across the border to Mexico. The cop chasing all of this down is played by Sterling Hayden.

In Once A Thief the excon is  Alain Delon he been out on parole six years after doing a 18 month stretch in San Quentin, he has a loving wife Ann-Margret and a baby girl. He had a good job for an import company but got fired after getting framed for a Chinatown deli robbery and murder. One of the two thieves wore his trademark sheepskin coat and drove a vintage 1931 Ford Model A. The frame up was done by two associates of his gangster brother Jack Palance, John Davis Chandler and Tony Musante. The reason is because they want to use Delon as the inside man to rob the import company of a million dollars worth of platinum wire. Van Hefiln is the cop with a grudge against Delon. He believes it was Delon who shot him during a robbery before he got pinched for the crime that sent him to prison. Familiar and yet a bit different. Its a Transitional Noir.

It got a crisp aesthetic that fits in style/composition-wise with Kiss Me Deadly, Death In Small Doses, The Harder They Fall, A Hat full Of Rain, My Gun Is Quick, Plunder Road, Odds Against Tomorrow, Screaming Mimi, Sweet Smell Of Success, Murder by Contract, The Beat Generation, The Crimson Kimono, Blast Of Silence, The Young Savages, Night Tide, Something Wild, All Fall Down, Cape Fear, Experiment In Terror, The Manchurian Candidate,  Underworld U.S.A., Requiem For A Heavyweight, The Pawnbroker, and its also reminiscent of the jazz club opening of  I Want To Live.  What your are seeing with the above and particularly with Once A Thief, is a Panavision "wide screen" Noir. The blacks are inky and not crushed. Claustrophobia is replaced by agoraphobia. The old Academy Ratios (1.37:1) last hurrah is soon going to be in grind-house Exploitation Films and Porno Loops.

Directed by Ralph Nelson (Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962),and written by Zekial Marko, based on his novel. Cinematography was by Classic Film Noir Vet Robert Burks (Beyond the Forest (1949), The Enforcer (1951), Strangers on a Train (1951), Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951), Rear Window (1954), The Wrong Man (1956), Vertigo (1958)) and Music by Lalo Schifrin who wrote the memorable themes to TV's Mission: Impossible (1966), Mannix (1967), Cool Hand Luke (1967), and Bullitt (1968), the theme's to all the Dirty Harry films, and Coogan's Bluff (1968)) .

The film stars French Noir Vet Alain Delon (Purple Noon (1960), Le Samouraï (1967), Le Cercle Rouge (1970), Un Flic (1972)), Ann-Margret (Viva Las Vegas (1964), Kitten with a Whip (1964), Murderers' Row (1966), Carnal Knowledge (1971), 52 Pick-Up (1986)). Four Classic Film Noir Veterans, Van Heflin, Jack Palance and Jeff Corey with four noir a piece and Steve Mitchell with three. Rounding out the cast are John Davis Chandler (The Young Savages (1961), Capone (1975)), Tony Musante (The Incident (1967), The Detective (1968), The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970)), Yuki Shimoda (Man-Trap (1961). and Noir TV Johnny Midnight 1960) and Tammy Locke (The Naked Kiss (1964)).

All the performances are good, Van Heflin is looking his age and a bit tired but it goes with the character's story line, John Davis Chandler is creepy as the shade wearing druggie, but no one really stands out from the pack. Anne Margaret jettisons her sex kitten shtick, Jack Palance is believable as the Croatian/Italian big brother hailing originally from Trieste, his Italian sounds great.

Van Helfin BTW is also supposedly from Trieste in the story and definitely has an Italian mother, though he has no accent. This sort of mirrors my own Italian/Croatian background. My father was an Italian from Croatia my mother was from New York City and I have no accent either. So a believable scenario would go like this. Mike Vido was born in Trieste to an Italian mother and say a U.S. GI of Italian decent from San Francisco and arrived in San Francisco at an early age. He wouldn't have an accent.

Alain Delon though definitely sounds French not Italian. I suppose to untrained ears he just sounds foreign. It a minor quibble. There are some great sequences of early sixties San Francisco too boot. Full review in Film Noir/ Gangster pages 7/10

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52 minutes ago, spence said:

Asa kid The wolfman was by far the scariest of the Universal Monsters  Jack Pierce dserved a special statuette for it's make up & string score again

I grew up watching the Universal monster films and the Wolf Man was always my favourite. He scared the heck out of me in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, in particular. I was such a fan of this character that I sent a fan letter to Chaney and was thrilled to receive his autograph on a card in response, one of the real thrills of my young life. I've still got that card. His signature, by the way, is almost identical to that of his father.

MoSW5e5.jpg

 

Here's his Dad's:

1925-lon-chaney-signature-2666.jpg?h=400

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27 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I grew up watching the Universal monster films and the Wolf Man was always my favourite. He scared the heck out of me in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, in particular. I was such a fan of this character that I sent a fan letter to Chaney and was thrilled to receive his autograph on a card in response, one of the real thrills of my young life. I've still got that card. His signature, by the way, is almost identical to that of his father.

Great story Tom. Lon Jr is a great favorite of mine as well. I was able to get the autograph of his grandson Ron at a horror movie convention about 20 years ago. 

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I watched the TCM premiere of "Summertree" Saturday night.  This 1971 anti-war movie starred Michael Douglas, Brenda Vaccaro, Jack Warden, Barbara Bel Geddes, and Kirk Callaway.  Douglas plays a college student who's trying to figure out what to do with his life, as most 19-21 year old kids are wont to do.  As long as he stays in college, he can get a deferment from the draft to Vietnam.  Following his Christmas break, he decides to apply to a music conservancy after he gets good initial reviews from his audition (guitar playing).  A man waiting off-stage offers him a job to play in between band sets at a coffee house he owns, and Douglas jumps at the chance.  Things are going swell.  He has a job offer, a chance to study and make music, a love life that is sweet and hot with Brenda Vaccaro (a nurse who's separated, but not yet divorced from her husband), good rapport with his 'little brother', played by Kirk Callaway, and a somewhat tepid, but improving relationship with his parents (Warden and Bel Geddes).

Then he makes the fateful decision to drop out of college to pursue his music education.  Since the conservancy is tied to the university he's attending, things should be fine as far as his draft status is concerned.  Things in his life begin to unravel as the first big 'Whoops' occurs.  He doesn't get a scholarship to the conservancy.  His father shows up to give him his draft notice.  His girlfriend's husband shows up from 'Nam.  His 'little brother's' real life brother is killed in 'Nam.  Talk about when it rains, it pours!!  So Jerry (Douglas' character) tries to figure out how to get out of the draft.  He settles on his last, best idea, which is to high-tail it off to Canada.  He buys a beat up Ford Falcon and stops at his home to bid his parents adieu.  His mom doesn't like the idea of him leaving, but she's supportive of his decision.  Dad is against the idea.  Is it because he's concerned about his son being labeled a fugitive or a coward?  We aren't sure, but he gives in and takes his son to an auto repair shop to check out the car and get a new set of tires for the trip north.  While at the garage, Douglas overhears Warden speaking with the owner of the body shop imploring him to do something, anything to disable the vehicle for a few days (presumably to try and reason with his son).   Douglas freaks out, jumps in the car, burns rubber, and tries to speed off, but instead T-bones a car being hauled by a tow truck to the body shop.  Warden gets in on the passenger side of the car and has a staredown with his boy.

I'm not going to give away the ending here, but it does have a stunning twist to it.  Well, stunning as far as I was concerned.  Prior to Saturday night, I had only seen "Summertree" once, and that was back in 1973 or 74 when it was on the CBS Late Movie, which came on after the local news at 10:30.  Back then, NBC had the Tonight Show and ABC had The Joey Bishop Show (I think), while CBS showed movies that lasted anywhere from 90 minutes to two hours in length.  As for "Summertree", I'd give it about 6.5 out of 10.

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25 minutes ago, midwestan said:

I'm not going to give away the ending here, but it does have a stunning twist to it.

Douglas kept his mother down in the fruit cellar? 😉

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12 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Douglas kept his mother down in the fruit cellar? 😉

Nah, not that twisted!

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