speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

That was my small issue with the movie too. I guess though in 1934, who knew what Mickey Rooney would grow up to look like. 
 

I guess that’s great for Mickey to grow up to look like Clark, but bad for Clark that he used to look like Mickey. 

Well, Jan Brady grew up to look like Imogene Coca.

 

imogene1A.png

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4 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Well, Jan Brady grew up to look like Imogene Coca.

 

imogene1A.png

Poor Aunt Jenny. 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm not a big fan of horror movies. I've seen Rosemary's Baby exactly once.

My favorite part was when the one woman delivered her "Hail Satan!" line with a little too much enthusiasm.

Aunt Bee's friend Clara was a member of the coven!

Needle_large.jpg

 

 

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6 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Aunt Bee's friend Clara was a member of the coven!

Needle_large.jpg

 

 

Oh Clara Edwards. Her and her 12 blue ribbons for her pickles.

Her advice to Aunt Bee who makes terrible "kerosene cucumbers."

"Maybe if you used younger cucumbers then they (Aunt Bee's pickles) wouldn't be so soft, and use fresher spices!" 

That poor man from Oregon was given a jar of those gross things.

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I love this scene from Rosemary's Baby with Ruth Gordon in the bedroom on the telephone.  In an interview cinematographer William Fraker said Polanski insisted that the shot be set up in this way.

At an early screening that Fraker attended he said people actually started craning their necks as if trying to look around the door at Ruth and realized how right Polanski was.

 

7-Rosemarys-RB-2.thumb.jpg.ab20ae54479056985caaa94705d0227b.jpg

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6 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

There are some funny, cringing moments in it, making this a very unusual movie experience.

"You should get cancer!  I hope you get cancer!"

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9 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Well, Jan Brady grew up to look like Imogene Coca.

 

imogene1A.png

 

Have you seen Eve Plumb? :huh:

eve-plumb-now-1568063575747.jpg

 

What an insult! :lol:

imogene-coca-older_thumb.jpg

 

 

I once bet good money the one shot actress Hatty Jones would look like Madeleine Albright.  Took a different direction. Glad I don't gamble.

 

1534412448-screen-shot-2018-08-16-at-104

albright.jpeg

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9 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Oh Clara Edwards. Her and her 12 blue ribbons for her pickles.

Her advice to Aunt Bee who makes terrible "kerosene cucumbers."

"Maybe if you used younger cucumbers then they (Aunt Bee's pickles) wouldn't be so soft, and use fresher spices!" 

That poor man from Oregon was given a jar of those gross things.

If only Aunt Bee had known that Clara was a Satanist, she'd have recognized Clara's perfect pickles as the devil's handiwork.

  

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53 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

If only Aunt Bee had known that Clara was a Satanist, she'd have recognized Clara's perfect pickles as the devil's handiwork.  

If the lady from the diner in The Birds lived in Mayberry, she'd have Clara's number quick!

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16 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Aunt Bee's friend Clara was a member of the coven!

Needle_large.jpg

Hope Summers....remember it's not nice to fool Mother Nature! 

Don't forget favorite wise-cracker Patsy Kelly was also part of the coven. She was the one who rocked the baby-

eddb01c30fe0114e5f27997c6d5e8fe5--rosema

I just love the vibrant color palette clothes used to offer. Used to be the only people who dressed in somber colors were law enforcement & mourners.

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On 10/11/2019 at 8:37 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I try not to write about movies I have written about and/or seen before, but seems like it's been quiet of late (I have to admit, I am underwhelmed by the October schedule thus far)

that said, I watched THE BLACK CAT 1934

the_black_cat_1934_by_seizuredemon-d3gzi

THIS IS A FILM I have been slow to "come around" to, I first watched it on either VHS or AMC as a child (8? 9?) and much was lost on me. IT HAS SINCE really grown on me, and I have come to embrace it for the truly unique film it is.

I have stolen something very important from this movie.

I really wish more films ended with TCHAIKOVSKY'S (sp?) OVERTURE FOR ROMEO AND JULIET cranking on the soundtrack as the whole set gets dynamited and the cast flees for their lives...I mean, if YOU can think of a better way to end a movie, LET ME KNOW by all means.

DAVID MANNERS, sigh, every time I get mad at him for kind of ruining every scene he is in in everything I look at those PUPPY DOG EYES and I forgive him...as a huge fan of 1930's horror movies, one of my FAVORITE "leitmotifs" in films of the period is the figure of THE UTTERLY USELESS YOUNG ROMANTIC LEAD who does nothing but get in the way of the wise old Professor who is here to actually get things done. The only romantic male lead in a horror movie of the time that is more worthless is the guy in WHITE ZOMBIE.

 

It was nice seeing Lugosi and Karloff facing off.  Bela looked aristocratic and serious and noble, a complete 180 from Dracula.  But when he finally has Karloff’s character where he wants him, that maniacal grin comes out. And Karloff looked truly satanic.  I was hoping Bela’s Dracula would show up, just to expose Poelzig as a rank amateur.  Yes, these 1930's horror pictures are great.

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Party Girl (1995)

This film featured Parker Posey, as twenty-something Mary, the ultimate party girl. I mostly knew Posey from her appearances in the Christopher Guest mockumentaries. Her most memorable performance for me was her appearance in "Best in Show," where she frantically looks for another "busy bee," her dog's favorite toy, after it is mistakenly left at home.

"It's like a bee."
"That's a parrot in a bee costume." 

Anyway, "Party Girl," is most notable for being the first film to premiere on the internet. I believe it is also the film that started Posey's reign as the 90s queen of the indie films as well. 

At the beginning of "Party Girl," we see Posey throwing a massive rave and charging admission. She ends up being arrested for illegally selling alcohol without the proper permits. Posey calls her godmother, Judy, to bail her out. It seems that this is a repeat thing with Posey as her godmother seems exasperated with this latest turn of events. 

Judy tells Posey that she needs to get it together and that she needs to repay her for loans and money spent bailing her out of jail. Posey is given a job as a library clerk. But there's one major obstacle--Posey doesn't know the Dewey Decimal System! She originally thinks the library is going to be a boring, thankless job. Then she starts learning about the Dewey Decimal System and realizes how much a simple organization system can improve her quality of life. She also learns how many resources are available at the library and really starts to lean into being a librarian.

Meanwhile, as Posey becomes more serious in her life and finally sees that she may have some direction, instead of an aimless life like constantly partying, her friends seemingly are standing in her way.

I liked this film, especially Posey, but also thought the film was kind of weird. As a frequent library patron, I loved the emphasis on the Dewey Decimal System (shout-out to biographies in 921!) and the old-school library organization methods depicted in the film.

I also loved Posey's enormous apartment, which though kind of shabby, was huge. I am curious how she afforded it in NYC. The apartment seems like it used to be a grocery store or something.

This was a good film, I'm not sure if it'd be one that I'd have to see over and over.

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"Faust" (1926) it was a bit boring and difficult at best to read the small yellow translation on the title cards. Some of the movie sets stood out too much as not being realistic, for example the angel.  Can clearly see he is standing in front of a prop - gives new meaning to "fixed wing".

Faust looks like an evil incarnate of Moses. :wacko:

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(Should had played Johnny Cash's "Ring of Fire". :P)

 

The few humorous parts was the devil fa_ting on the city,

Faust-1.jpg

 

and can't seem to make up his mind if he wants to be the devil or Count Dracula. :lol:

latest?cb=20151105213344

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Went a bit more modern today and took care of a film from 2007, Zodiac, on Showtime. I'm kicking myself over not seeing it sooner. Why did I wait so long to view it? Because I ended up loving it. It's one of the best of its decade and aside from a few gory scenes, is blessedly more atmospheric than grisly and in-your-face. For the most part it feels more like a 70s film in terms or depth of emotion than one made more recently. Sublime performances and a gripping tale that holds interest for over 2 and a half hours.

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15 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Went a bit more modern today and took care of a film from 2007, Zodiac, on Showtime. I'm kicking myself over not seeing it sooner. Why did I wait so long to view it? Because I ended up loving it. It's one of the best of its decade and aside from a few gory scenes, is blessedly more atmospheric than grisly and in-your-face. For the most part it feels more like a 70s film in terms or depth of emotion than one made more recently. Sublime performances and a gripping tale that holds interest for over 2 and a half hours.

It a great Neo Noir sort of an amalgam of Police Procedurals like M (1931), He Walked by Night (1948), The Naked City (1948), The Blue Lamp (1950) The Big Heat (1953) and a Newspaper Noirs like Scandal Sheet (1952), Call Northside 777 (1948), etc., etc., with a lot of style.

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Just now, cigarjoe said:

It a great Neo Noir sort of an amalgam of Police Procedurals like M (1931), He Walked by Night (1948), The Naked City (1948), The Blue Lamp (1950) The Big Heat (1953) and a Newspaper Noirs like Scandal Sheet (1952), Call Northside 777 (1948), etc., etc., with a lot of style.

Also maybe a bit of While the City Sleeps thrown in (you know the one where the newspaper writers were all racing against one another to find the lipstick killer)

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7 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Also maybe a bit of While the City Sleeps thrown in (you know the one where the newspaper writers were all racing against one another to find the lipstick killer)

Yes definitely, there's more that we can site if we think of them. 😎

Ace in the Hole (1951) and Deadline - U.S.A. (1952) are others

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The Dublin Nightmare (1958)

Poster.jpg

"Holy St. Patrick it's the guard!"

The director was John Pomeroy, it was his only film.

It was written by John Tully and based on Robin Estridge's novel. Cinematography by Eric Cross. Music by Edwin Astley. The film stars William Sylvester (2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)), Marla Landi (The Invisible Man (1959)), Richard Leech (A Night to Remember (1958)).

The Dublin Nightmare moves along at a quick pace and shows a bit of style to keep it interesting. The cast is made up of all unknowns (at least to me). Called a "quota quickie," a cheapo movie that fit the government mandate requiring a certain percentage of  British made film show in theaters. Filmed at Twickenham Studio. Full Review with  screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster. 6-7/10

The DVD is part of Great British Film Noir set Vol 2. 6/10 (Region Free DVD player required)

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those of you who know me know that i tend to avoid modern films for a combination of reasons, although every now and then even *I* have to break down and admit when something is good.

(this is not one of those times.)

I watched HOTEL MUMBAI (2019) starring DEV PATEL, it is about the 2008 terrorist attacks on The Taj hotel in MUMBAI (formerly BOMBAY, India)

I watched it for the most esoteric of reasons- it features the final role of actress CARMEN DUNCAN- who died this year in February- her part is small (maybe 5 or 6 minutes) but she has two great scenes which she nails, sometimes just by using her eyes. I really, really, really wish she had gotten *that* part that had launched her into KELLY BISHOP or JESSICA WALTER territory, i could just watch her all day.

here she is with DEV PATEL- who is VERY handsome and does a good job in spite of the fact that the dialogue is SCREENWRITER 101:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-VPfkaTQxQ

(apparently I can't embed the video in this post, but that link will take you to the scene on youtube.)

MY BIG PROBLEM WITH THE MOVIE, which is the same one I have with most modern films- was the lack of any character you could relate to, empathize with and really get to know- it spends no time with anyone for too long, all the character development we get is one guy doesn't know you can't get a burger in India, one guy likes women with big nipples, and one guy has to wear a pair of shoes that're too small (the women are nearly all nameless, underwritten and in MOST cases- mute) from then on it's just sunrise-tinted footage of the TERRORISTS getting ready to that damned wailing music for an INTERMINABLE amount of time and then shaky handheld footage of people running and getting shot.

when one particular major character is killed- it is supposed to be a SHOCK (or maybe a STUNT?), but the role is so underwritten and the actor playing him so boring, GOD HELP ME, but i SNORTED.

it is a tale of sound and fury, surprisingly not told by idiots, but signifying not much more than perversely recreating a real life tragedy and rendering it into something cold and technically proficient, with no moral or insight, but every shaky, heavily edited moment is, at all times, FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION.

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PS- I actually tried to google what one properly calls that "damned wailing music" that is THEME of EVERY TERRORIST in EVERY MOVIE made since, what? 1990? Couldn't though, so all apologies for being culturally insensitive and I'm sure someone, somewhere likes it...

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I watched time waster THE BRASS BOTTLE 1964 mostly because of the kick jazz leads: Burl Ives, Tony Randall & Barbara Eden and because my library HAS it!

220px-Brassbottleposter.jpg

A silly story of mild mannered Harold Vennimore (Randall) ending up with a Genie (Ives). Eden plays Vennimore's girlfriend and is adorable as usual. Ives is his humongous self playing the flamboyant Genie and Randall actually holds his own, showing some early comedy chops. Tony Randall is a joy to watch - he remains coolly controlled alternating with spa stic*  hilarity with each predictable disaster created by the Genie. Also nice seeing Bollywood star Kamala Devi dancing in costume.

It's pretty much a kid's film, basic story that pretty much became I DREAM OF JEANNIE for sweetheart Barbara Eden. Too bad she had to play her Jeannie a dumbbell, while Ives got to be commanding & crafty-much more fun.

 

Edited by TikiSoo
*really, Otto?

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

so all apologies for being culturally insensitive and I'm sure someone, somewhere likes it...

Image result for never apologize images

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Girl in the News (1940).

Margaret Lockwood plays a nurse whose patient commits suicide in a way that makes it look like the nurse did it.  Her attorney gets her found not guilty, but she can't get a job.  Until a wealthy man's butler (Emlyn Williams) hires her.  Of course, he's got ulterior motives, which is that the butler and the wealthy man's wife are planning to kill the guy in the same way that Lockwood's previous patient died, so that everybody will put two and two together and figure Lockwood did it.

This is a surprisingly good programmer from the UK, with a strong cast of names movie buffs will recognize (Irene Handl as the first patient and Roger Livesey as a police detective and friend of Lockwood's attorney), and directed by Carol Reed early in his career. 7/10

Available on this box set of British B movies

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

those of you who know me know that i tend to avoid modern films for a combination of reasons, although every now and then even *I* have to break down and admit when something is good.

(this is not one of those times.)

 

How long ago do you usually stop at film-wise? Just curious because over 90% of the films I've seen this year were before 2000......

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PS- I actually tried to google what one properly calls that "damned wailing music" that is THEME of EVERY TERRORIST in EVERY MOVIE made since, what? 1990? Couldn't though, so all apologies for being culturally insensitive and I'm sure someone, somewhere likes it...

I wonder if there's a song just called "damned wailing music."  I rarely see any of the dramatic or action films, because they are all literally the same movie.  Swap out the leading actor/actress and change the country, and they're all pretty much the same.

It seems like every film these days is trying to be so profound and poignant and is trying to change the world.  Even well known properties have to take on this dark, depressing re-telling of the story. 

Songs are even being covered in this fashion.  Did we need to have a sad version of "Pure Imagination" from Willy Wonka? Well, we got one. 

Award acceptance speeches follow the same path.  I don't even mean politically-oriented speeches. But everyone tries so hard to give a profound, earth shattering speech.  The most memorable speeches are the ones that don't sound like the person has practiced giving that speech in front of the mirror the last year of their life. I love the award speeches with spontaneous profanity or something ridiculous, like Jack Palance's one-armed push-ups that one year. Even Oscar hosts aren't funny anymore. They try so hard to be quirky and funny, that they just come across as stupid and annoying.

All of these attempts (in movies, songs, award speeches) at trying to be so serious, complex, abstract, with a dash of tragedy, shrouded in a color scheme of muted colors, come across as so incredibly contrived and disingenuous to me. 

Some of the best films are the ones that aren't trying so hard. 

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