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I Just Watched...

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Betcha the Academy sticks to new main host again

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One that's playing on cable demand that nobody hardly knows about is Cannery Row  a nice little movie with Nick Nolte & Debra Winer  It was just prior to him in 48Hrs & fell through the radar

Everything about it is nice John Huston narrates it   anyone see it yet? 

 

(***-out of 4 stars)

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On 10/16/2019 at 1:50 PM, HoldenIsHere said:

Aunt Bee's friend Clara was a member of the coven!

Needle_large.jpg

 

 

& was shot at the Dakota Arms in NYC where John Lennon lived & was gunned-down just in front of the bldg

 

It's also somewhat famous because Farrow was told by Sinatra to report on the set of his Tony Rome film & sad no He was so furious he had her divorce papers served right there on the set at the Dakota the following day

Everything was already signed by him when his lawyer arrived

They remained friends until he went in '98 though, but she was stunned at how fast he acted

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59 minutes ago, spence said:

One that's playing on cable demand that nobody hardly knows about is Cannery Row  a nice little movie with Nick Nolte & Debra Winer  It was just prior to him in 48Hrs & fell through the radar

Everything about it is nice John Huston narrates it   anyone see it yet? 

 

(***-out of 4 stars)

Nice film got me on quite the Steinbeck binge for awhile there.  

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Swing Your Lady (1938)

Humphrey Bogart in a hillbilly wrestling comedy with musical numbers. How can it miss?

One of the prices that Bogie paid as a Warner Bros contract player in his pre-stardom days, in this film he's cast as a fast talking wrestling promoter travelling in the sticks with his wrestler and two assistants looking for a local opponent to take on his wrestling star.

Nat Pendleton plays the slow thinkin', slow talkin' wrassler who gets kinda sweet on a big boned female blacksmith, played by Louise Fazenda. Penny Singleton plays Bogart's girl who suddenly shows up in the small town, with Frank McHugh and Allen Jenkins as the two assistants. A very young Ronald Reagan can also be spotted in a couple of scenes as a reporter.

Dumb and unsophisticated comedy, to put it mildly. You may find it mildly amusing in an awful sort of way if you're in a proper mood for it. But there were three musical numbers, one a ho down dance done to the title song of "Swing Your Lady," sung by Singleton, that I found pretty difficult to get through. Bogart is nowhere to be seen during any of the musical numbers, probably arguing with his agent to find out if there was still a contract loop hole allowing him out of the picture.

TCM shows this film on occasion, which may have the ghost of Bogart shaking his head. The actor, by the way, called Swing Your Lady his worst film.

b08b9d44dfdf888e462ee873684a8e70.jpg

2 out of 4

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18 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

How long ago do you usually stop at film-wise? Just curious because over 90% of the films I've seen this year were before 2000......

Thank you for asking!

In 2007 I was broken, literally broken, by the movie GOOD LUCK CHUCK, which some friends of mine were watching. From thereon I actually went many years straight where i did not watch one single thing (movie or tv show that was not one of those investigative murder shows) made not just in that year, but in the last 20-30 YEARS- I went strict, hardcore 30's, 40's, 50's, a little 60's and some 80's and 90's diet and that was IT.  (i've since taken an interest in the 1970's)

It actually triggers the depressive side of personality to watch modern movies because so many that i come across just...sigh, are so bad in so many ways when they do not have to be that it breaks my heart.

and it worries me that someday i will be lucky enough to complewte and submit a screenplay only to have it eaten up and crapped out by revisions and focus groups and A BIG STAR who decides to attach themself, but only if they can be in 97% of the scenes and I will also have to find a part for Gwyneth or some **** and it makes me want to drown myself in the toilet.

HOWEVER, during OSCAR MONTH several years back, I just COULDN'T with the same old same old on TCM and I went ahead and started watching some modern TV and a few more recent movies, it actually took me a long while (3 months or so?) before i came back to TCM (FILE ALSO UNDER; THE DANGERS OF OSCAR MONTH, BECAUSE IF IT CAN TURN *ME* OFF to classic movies, THERE'S A PROBLEM)

so, sometimes i see recent movies and TV shows I do like (FLEABAG for instance, i found surprisingly charming although i was all set to hate watch it), but ANY TIME i watch a modern movie, there is a real danger (sily as this sounds) of it triggering an honest to goodness deppresive episode. 

in new that will surprise NONE OF YOU, I am an odd person.

 

**note- however, while i was underwhelmed by the movie HOTEL MUMBAI, it was by no means bad...it just frustrated me that it so easily could have been better in so many, many ways. and again, it was nice to see CARMEN DUNCAN get to slay two scenes (although the fate of her character is another thing I have to take issue with in the movie)

 

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On 10/15/2019 at 11:49 PM, kingrat said:

Completely agree, although I have just a LITTLE bit of trouble believing that Mickey Rooney grows up to be Clark Gable.

I suppose. But which one of them made whoopie with Ava Gardner in real life?

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WEST SIDE STORY (1961; rewatch)

Visually stunning and appealing. I very firmly believe this is one of the best films ever made. Even if you don't like musicals, you have to admit the overall messages and camera-work are fantastic. 

Image result for west side story 1961

FUNNY FACE (1957) 

Another rewatch. I haven't seen this in about 5 years or so... Another very visually appealing movie musical featuring Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn, and Kay Thompson. The entire opening credit sequence was great, and I always enjoy the "Think Pink" number. 

Image result for funny face 1957

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The Second Time Around (2016) Amazon Prime

Charming little film about two senior citizens who meet in an assisted-living center. Katherine (Linda Thorson) is sent there to rehab for a broken hip, while Isaac (Stuart Margolin) is a resident. Together, they discover their mutual interests, and their interest in each other. Amusing, touching at times, and never boring, this is a nice movie for the older set. I hadn’t seen Thorson since she replaced Diana Rigg in “The Avengers” television series. Here, in her upper 60s, she is simply gorgeous. The big surprise (for me) was seeing Margolin, almost unrecognizable, balding, and with a convincing Yiddish accent. His character could have been ripe for satire, but instead, he gives a restrained performance, and steals every scene. Highly recommended if you’re looking for a nice, pleasant diversion. Oh … make sure to stick around after the closing credits, if you want to see and hear Margolin singing the title song.

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20 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

The Second Time Around (2016) Amazon Prime

Charming little film about two senior citizens who meet in an assisted-living center. Katherine (Linda Thorson) is sent there to rehab for a broken hip, while Isaac (Stuart Margolin) is a resident. Together, they discover their mutual interests, and their interest in each other. Amusing, touching at times, and never boring, this is a nice movie for the older set. I hadn’t seen Thorson since she replaced Diana Rigg in “The Avengers” television series. Here, in her upper 60s, she is simply gorgeous.

It must be telepathy or something.  I'm entering my third week of a self-imposed television exile.  In the interim, I've watched several movies on-line (YouTube), plus the box set of "The Avengers" that features every episode with Diana Rigg.  On occasion, I find myself asking, 'What ever happened to Linda Thorson?'  Now I know!  Time to check IMDB for her filmography and see if there's something I can catch on-line for free.

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Reality Bites (1994)

This film is considered one of the quintessential films of Gen-X. I've been on an 80s/90s kick lately and this was one of the films that I borrowed from the library.

I loved it.

As a young Gen-Xer who treads the line between young Gen-X and old Millennial, I very much identified with this film. Between this film, "Heathers," and "Singles," all films that depict Gen-X issues, I found the issues presented in "Reality Bites" to be very relatable.

Winona Ryder plays Lelaina (which was an interesting name), a recent college-graduate who aspires to create documentaries. Many of the scenes of the film are presented through the lens of a camcorder. We later discover that these are moments being captured for a documentary Lelaina is putting together. Her documentary is attempting to capture the trials and tribulations of a new generation of young people trying to find love and careers in the real world. Lelaina works as a production assistant to a phony perky morning show host, Grant Gubler played by John Mahoney (Frasier's dad on "Frasier"). Grant's morning show is overly jovial, to the point where you just know he's a complete monster off camera. Grant has a morning segment called "Video View" where he plays various people's home videos and such. Lelaina thinks that this would be a great venue to show the film she made about her friends, but Grant doesn't want to hear about the problems involving "young people." He also puts down Lelaina's point of view and appearance, which I felt was representative of the baby boomers and older generations' perspective of younger generations.

Through a chance encounter, Lelaina meets an executive, Michael Grates (Ben Stiller) who works at a program called "In Your Face" which airs on an MTV-esque channel. Michael tells Lelaina that he may be able to get her documentary on his show. She's ecstatic, but that enthusiasm quickly fades when she realizes that they've turned her pet project into a vehicle to promote commercialism--something she rails against in her valedictorian speech at college graduation.  "In Your Face's" version of Lelaina's documentary reminded me of MTV's "Real World." My husband said the music sounded like the theme song from "King of the Hill."

A love triangle between Lelaina, Michael and Lelaina's friend/roommate, Troy (Ethan Hawke) develops and is the center for much of the film. Troy dislikes Michael as he feels that he represents everything that is the opposite of what Lelaina truly believes and wants in her life. Lelaina is very much about independence, especially when it comes to art. Michael represents corporate and capitalism. Troy on the other hand, is a long time friend of Lelaina's, but he doesn't represent stability. He doesn't seem to be able to hold down a job (he's fired from his recent job running a newsstand for eating a Snickers bar). He's also in a grunge band. Troy is a jerk to Lelaina throughout much of the film, but you also get the sense of an enormous sexual tension between the two.

Janeane Garafolo and Steve Zahn round out the cast as Lelaine and Troy's roommates, Vicki and Sammy. Vicki is the manager of a GAP, a job that she's very proud to have. She speaks of never being given a big responsibility before the management job and she's honored that she's being trusted with a whole store. Vicki also has a history of sleeping around, and she goes through an AIDS scare--a very big topic in the 90s. Sammy realizes that he's gay and comes out to his very conservative parents.

All around this was a great film, one that I enjoyed very much. I loved the scene with Lelaine watching psychic hotline commercials, then calling one, only to speak with the psychic for hours, all through the night and into the morning. By the end of the conversation, Lelaine is consulting the psychic. Lelaine ends up running a $400 phone bill for calling the 1-900 number.

I also love Lisa Loeb's "Stay" song that plays over the ending credits.

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I'm older than you Speedy, but I like it too.  I like Winona a lot in this.

I wonder what you think of "Some Kind of Wonderful?"

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3 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

I'm older than you Speedy, but I like it too.  I like Winona a lot in this.

I wonder what you think of "Some Kind of Wonderful?"

I haven't seen Some Kind of Wonderful.  I should get that one from the library.

Up next on my 80s/90s movies, I have: Road House, Grosse Pointe Blank, Adventures in Baby Sitting, Girls Just Wanna Have Fun, and Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead.  I also like the coming of age type ones about teenagers/20-somethings.  I've already watched Heathers, Singles and now Reality Bites

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I commented on Zodiac about a week ago here is a partial review...

Zodiac (2007) Serial Killer Neo Noir Masterpiece


Zodiac%2BPoster.jpg

It's a sort of an amalgam of Police Procedural Noirs like one of the earliest, M (1931), also He Walked by Night (1948), The Naked City (1948), The Blue Lamp (1950) The Big Heat (1953) and the Newspaper Noirs like Scandal Sheet (1952), Call Northside 777 (1948), While the City Sleeps (1956) etc., etc., with a lot of noir visuals and style.

Zodiac was directed by David Fincher, of his films I've liked Se7en (1995), and the fantasy The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), didn't care that much story-wise for Gone GirlThe Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, or The Social Network. From those last three listed choices of films that he made, they don't particularly give me the confidence to attend one of his films on the basis of his name alone being connected with the project. With director names like the Coen Brothers, Tarantino, or Lynch, I'll pretty much do a blind buy in, its a good bet I'll know what I'm getting.

It sort of makes me long for the old Hollywood Studio system, at least the part where, say a good director of Crime Films or Westerns would be able to carve out a nice Genre niche and perfect his style and ideas over a series of films. Se7en and Zodiac were great Police Procedural Noirs, I wish he'd make more of them, he made great ones.

Zodiac was written by James Vanderbuilt and was based on Robert Graysmith's eponymous book. Robert was a political cartoonist for the San Francisco Chronicle. In 1969 when the Zodiac killer case broke, he attempted to decode the four cryptograms sent to the paper and in turn became obsessed with the case. He wrote two books about the Zodiac and five other pieces on other crimes. One of those was made into the film Auto Focus (2002).


The well researched film (a lot of scenes where shot where the actual events happened) follows the investigations by Graysmith, San Francisco Chronicle crime reporter Paul Avery, San Francisco Police Department inspectors Dave Toschi and Bill Armstrong, and Sgt. Jack Mulanax from the Vallejo, California Police Department where the first Zodiac killing took place.

It's Fincher's style, the cinematography of Harris Savides, the dietetic soundtracks, and the music by David Shire, that combine to suck you into the story.

It's more like an ensemble film. All the actors do a great job though none of them really stands out performance wise, though of course most time is spent with Gyllenhaal, Downey Jr., Ruffalo, Edwards and Sevigny. They all could have been replaced by other actors with no real change in the overall quality of the film. 9/10 Full review with some screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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On 10/18/2019 at 9:17 PM, TomJH said:

Swing Your Lady (1938)

Humphrey Bogart in a hillbilly wrestling comedy with musical numbers. How can it miss?

One of the prices that Bogie paid as a Warner Bros contract player in his pre-stardom days, in this film he's cast as a fast talking wrestling promoter travelling in the sticks with his wrestler and two assistants looking for a local opponent to take on his wrestling star.

Nat Pendleton plays the slow thinkin', slow talkin' wrassler who gets kinda sweet on a big boned female blacksmith, played by Louise Fazenda. Penny Singleton plays Bogart's girl who suddenly shows up in the small town, with Frank McHugh and Allen Jenkins as the two assistants. A very young Ronald Reagan can also be spotted in a couple of scenes as a reporter.

Dumb and unsophisticated comedy, to put it mildly. You may find it mildly amusing in an awful sort of way if you're in a proper mood for it. But there were three musical numbers, one a ho down dance done to the title song of "Swing Your Lady," sung by Singleton, that I found pretty difficult to get through. Bogart is nowhere to be seen during any of the musical numbers, probably arguing with his agent to find out if there was still a contract loop hole allowing him out of the picture.

TCM shows this film on occasion, which may have the ghost of Bogart shaking his head. The actor, by the way, called Swing Your Lady his worst film.

b08b9d44dfdf888e462ee873684a8e70.jpg

2 out of 4

I'll be on the lookout for this! LOL.

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7 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

The Second Time Around (2016) Amazon Prime

Charming little film about two senior citizens who meet in an assisted-living center. Katherine (Linda Thorson) is sent there to rehab for a broken hip, while Isaac (Stuart Margolin) is a resident. Together, they discover their mutual interests, and their interest in each other. Amusing, touching at times, and never boring, this is a nice movie for the older set. I hadn’t seen Thorson since she replaced Diana Rigg in “The Avengers” television series. Here, in her upper 60s, she is simply gorgeous. The big surprise (for me) was seeing Margolin, almost unrecognizable, balding, and with a convincing Yiddish accent. His character could have been ripe for satire, but instead, he gives a restrained performance, and steals every scene. Highly recommended if you’re looking for a nice, pleasant diversion. Oh … make sure to stick around after the closing credits, if you want to see and hear Margolin singing the title song.

I haven't heard of Linda Thorson in years. Nice to know she's aging well.

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On 10/17/2019 at 6:49 AM, TikiSoo said:

Hope Summers....remember it's not nice to fool Mother Nature! 

Don't forget favorite wise-cracker Patsy Kelly was also part of the coven. She was the one who rocked the baby-

eddb01c30fe0114e5f27997c6d5e8fe5--rosema

I just love the vibrant color palette clothes used to offer. Used to be the only people who dressed in somber colors were law enforcement & mourners.

I wish TCM would show this. I havent seen it in many years. Such a shame. (Paramount again). It can't be THAT costly to rent. Ditch one of the show hosts!

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On 10/18/2019 at 5:54 PM, spence said:

One that's playing on cable demand that nobody hardly knows about is Cannery Row  a nice little movie with Nick Nolte & Debra Winer  It was just prior to him in 48Hrs & fell through the radar

Everything about it is nice John Huston narrates it   anyone see it yet? 

 

(***-out of 4 stars)

We enjoyed it. Narrator while Nick and Debra were dancing, "Nobody thought to tell them that they weren't any good."  We've found that line useful so many times.  

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15 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Zodiac was written by James Vanderbuilt and was based on Robert Graysmith's eponymous book. Robert was a political cartoonist for the San Francisco Chronicle. In 1969 when the Zodiac killer case broke, he attempted to decode the four cryptograms sent to the paper and in turn became obsessed with the case. He wrote two books about the Zodiac and five other pieces on other crimes. One of those was made into the film Auto Focus (2002).


The well researched film (a lot of scenes where shot where the actual events happened) follows the investigations by Graysmith, San Francisco Chronicle crime reporter Paul Avery, San Francisco Police Department inspectors Dave Toschi and Bill Armstrong, and Sgt. Jack Mulanax from the Vallejo, California Police Department where the first Zodiac killing took place.

It's Fincher's style, the cinematography of Harris Savides, the dietetic soundtracks, and the music by David Shire, that combine to suck you into the story.

It's more like an ensemble film. All the actors do a great job though none of them really stands out performance wise, though of course most time is spent with Gyllenhaal, Downey Jr., Ruffalo, Edwards and Sevigny. They all could have been replaced by other actors with no real change in the overall quality of the film. 9/10 Full review with some screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

I love this one as well 9/10. I have read a lot about the real life Zodiac case, which as of today has not been solved. I think it helps to know about the case beforehand, because you really have to pay attention when watching this film in order to catch everything that is happening. It is a treat for film buffs as well, Insp, Toschi was the inspiration for Bullitt, Steve McQueen hung out with him when researching the role and had a copy made of the unusual holster for his gun.In the film, reporter Paul Avery sarcastically calls Toschi "Bullitt". Dirty Harry also was inspired by the Zodiac case, as tough Insp. Harry Callahan is in pursuit of a mad San Francisco sniper. The Most Dangerous Game (1932) is mentioned in the film as well, Graysmith thinks Zodiac may be obsessed with the story of mad Count Zaroff who hunts humans. The chief suspect (played by John Carroll Lynch) admits to loving this story, in a great scene where he is questioned by the 3 detectives. 

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Men of the North (1930).

I'm sure our Canadian viewers will enjoy this thoroughly accurate look at life in the Great White North.  Gilbert Roland plays a French-Canadian trapper who falls in love with the daughter of the new owner of the gold mine, while Roland's old girlfriend, feeling jilted, accuses Roland of stealing gold from the mine.  Roland helps save a lot of people from the snow.

Almost every stereotype of Canada you can imagine is here, making this one an interesting experience.

5/10 for the unintentional laughs.

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11 hours ago, Fedya said:

Almost every stereotype of Canada you can imagine is here, making this one an interesting experience.

1-poutine-1.jpg

13421409?wid=480&hei=480

Since 1930, ay. Sorry.

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The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) 9/10 DVD

Image result for texas chainsaw massacre is back to become the classic chiller of all time images

Sally and her wheelchair bound brother Franklin go to small Texas town to visit their granddaddy's grave accompanied by Sally's boyfriend Jerry and another couple Kirk and Pam. They encounter a weird family of maniacs who slice and dice anyone that comes around.

This is a great exercise in sheer terror, I chose the above advert because it is the one I recall seeing in the paper when it was re released. 

The film is short on character development but great in pulse pounding horror. Marilyn Burns plays Sally and she is the greatest screamer I have ever seen on film, she looks great in those skin tight bell bottoms also. The low budget and grainy photography are actual assets to the film,director Tobe Hooper gives us great atmosphere. There is some macabre humor as we see the weird family of killers. We first meet the crazed Hitch-hiker and later his chainsaw wielding brother. The humor comes from the older brother who acts as a cook and keeps the two crazier brothers in line. There is surprisingly little gore in the film, for me the most disturbing scene was an extreme close up of Sally's terrified eyes. 

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This proves the "to each" concept since I thought it a stupid gore-fest.  A friend of mine however, still insists it's the greatest movie ever made!  More so than GONE WITH THE WIND, CITIZEN KANE or any other movie you can mention. 

Sepiatone

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6 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

This proves the "to each" concept since I thought it a stupid gore-fest.  A friend of mine however, still insists it's the greatest movie ever made!  More so than GONE WITH THE WIND, CITIZEN KANE or any other movie you can mention. 

Sepiatone

I didn't think anything special about Friday the 13th.  All I kept saying was "this person is having sex, they're going to die." "She's the virgin and is wearing white, she'll live." And sure enough, I was right.

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