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Richard Long

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does anyone know about him

I am asking because I am watching "The Stranger" on TCM and a very young Richard Long is in it

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THE STRANGER was early in his career.  I remember seeing him in THE EGG AND I - I thnk he was one of Ma & Pa Kettle's kids (I haven't seen that movie in decades).  He did a lot of television including THE BIG VALLEY.

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Richard Long costarred with Orson Welles in TOMORROW IS FOREVER, which was released a few months before THE STRANGER.

 

In the late 40s and early 50s, before he turned to television-- he was under contract with Universal. He met his first wife, Suzann Ball (cousin of Lucille Ball) when Suzann was also under contract at Universal.

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What about him?

 

He spent a long time under contract to Universal, in routine juvenile roles. He would do much better in TV, and is best remembered for The Big Valley, although that took little advantage of his talent for light comedy repartee, and could have been played by pretty much any competent male lead.

 

IMHO he was best seen during his stint at Warners TV, as a debonair con man on Maverick and a private eye on Bourbon Street Beat/77 Sunset Strip.

 

He also did some Twilight Zones, including a memorable one where he wakes up after a drunken party to discover no one recognizes him, and all proof of his existence has disappeared.

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What about him?

 

He spent a long time under contract to Universal, in routine juvenile roles. He would do much better in TV, and is best remembered for The Big Valley, although that took little advantage of his talent for light comedy repartee, and could have been played by pretty much any competent male lead.

 

IMHO he was best seen during his stint at Warners TV, as a debonair con man on Maverick and a private eye on Bourbon Street Beat/77 Sunset Strip.

 

He also did some Twilight Zones, including a memorable one where he wakes up after a drunken party to discover no one recognizes him, and all proof of his existence has disappeared.

And don't forget his last hit TV show, Nanny and the Professor, with Juliet Mills.

 

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanny_and_the_Professor

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And died at the much too young age of 47 years. Had coronary issues all his life due to an illness as a child, and which was not helped at all due to his heavy smoking and alcohol consumption.

 

Good actor. I always liked him, and one might say just suave enough to take roles that weren't offered to Gig Young first.

 

(...and another guy I always liked, died too young, and who Long always kind of reminded me of for a number of reasons)

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Good actor. I always liked him, and one might say just suave enough to take roles that weren't offered to Gig Young first.

 

(...and another guy I always liked, died too young, and who Long always kind of reminded me of for a number of reasons)

 

Ahh, great minds think alike... I meant to also write in my post that Long was sort of a TV Gig Young, who was kind of a road company Cary Grant.

 

But I forgot. Even a great mind has its limits.

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Good actor. I always liked him, and one might say just suave enough to take roles that weren't offered to Gig Young first.

 

(...and another guy I always liked, died too young, and who Long always kind of reminded me of for a number of reasons)

Yes.  They could almost go on that lookalike page, couldn't they.

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Yes.  They could almost go on that lookalike page, couldn't they.

Blech. I found Gig Young slimy. Similar to Robert Sterling, perhaps, but never Gig Young. Blech.

 

I liked Richard Long back in the day of the dinosaur, think he was in lots of the westerns I was forced to watch as a yout.

 

Judas Priest, he died at 47? What a waste.

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Here is another Richard Long fan. To me, he was always so believable in his roles. He was wonderful on The Big Valley, the voice of reason and strength. His first marriage to Suzan Ball was a true love story, and it seems that all of the Universal contractees at the time attended the wedding.

 

And yes, he was much too young when he died. I barely remember another TV series that he was in at the time of his death. It was called Thicker Than Water with Julie Harris.

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    Richard Long's last 'live' appearance was on MATCH GAME '74 for a week of episodes in late summer/early fall.  He talked briefly about the Tv movie he had just completed filming and called it "Cruise of Death" at the beginning of the one of the shows.  When the movie was first aired, however, the title had been slightly altered to "Death Cruise".  (There's an "intro" posted on YouTube for one of the shows he appeared in.  It's "Match Game 74 Opening #89").

 

    Before he settled in to large amounts of television work he did appear in decent number of movies and here they are:  

 

     RICHARD LONG (1927-1974) filmography

 

Death Cruise (1974-Tvm) C-73m.

Girl Who Came Gift-Wrapped, The (1974-Tvm) C-78m.

Make Like A Thief (1964-Finnish) 

Follow the Boys (1963) C-95m.

Tokyo After Dark (1959) 80m.

House on Haunted Hill (1958) 75m.

He Laughed Last (1956) C-77m.

Fury at Gunsight Pass (1956) 68m.

Cult of the Cobra (1955) 82m.

Playgirl (1954) 85m.

Saskatchewan (1954) C-87m.

All American (1953) 83m.

All I Desire (1953) 79m.

Back at the Front (1952) 87m.  (Follow-up feature to 1951's "Up Front")

Ma and Pa Kettle Back on the Farm (1951) 80m.

Air Cadet (1951) 94m.

Ma and Pa Kettle Go To Town (1950) 70m.

Kansas Raiders (1950) C-80m.

Criss Cross (1949) 88m.

Life of Riley, The (1949) 87m.

Ma and Pa Kettle (1949) 75m.  (aka:  "Further Adventures of Ma and Pa Kettle, The")

Tap Roots (1948) C-109m.

Egg and I, The (1947) 108m.

Dark Mirror, The (1946) 85m.

Stranger, The (1946) 95m.

Tomorrow Is Forever (1946) 105m.

---------------------------------------------

 

     • Perhaps Richard Long could have one of those 'Summer Under the Stars' days?  

 

     • The Finnish movie he starred in doesn't appear in any reference books I have; I suppose it was never reviewed even though someone wrote in on the IMDb it was released in the U.S. in February 1966.  I'd like to see "Make Like A Thief" some time.  Maybe there's a print of it in Finland!

 

     • The 1959 movie "Tokyo After Dark" does not appear in the second edition of "Leonard Maltin's Classic Movie Guide".  I don't have the first edition so I don't know if it's in there, however, I did find it in both the 1990 Leonard Maltin guide and the 1990/91 Steven H. Scheuer guide.   Conclusion:  Not every pre-1966 movie made the transition from the old LM movie book that included films from all years to the 'Classic' movie guide.     

    

 

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I remeber the TV movie "Death Cruise." It had a great cast and was an entertaining murder mystery. His was a rather large role in it.

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Richard Long fans need to see ALL I DESIRE. He plays the boyfriend of Barbara Stanwyck's daughter, and there is a charming scene where he dances with Stanwyck.

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Blech. I found Gig Young slimy. Similar to Robert Sterling, perhaps, but never Gig Young. Blech.

 

I wouldn't go quite so far as slimy, but I don't really like the Gig Young comparison either, maybe largely because I don't like Young and I do like Long. Categorizing him as very broadly speaking a Cary Grant type I agree with though.

 

I also agree with Richard Kimble that he was at his best in the Maverick/Bourbon Street Beat/77 Sunset Strip days (granted I've never seen Nanny and the Professor). The first time I took any real notice of him was as Bart's foil Gentleman Jack in Maverick, who sort of took over for Efrem Zimbalist's Dandy Jim for a bit after Zimbalist moved on to 77 Sunset Strip.

 

Then Long himself ended up playing a detective in one of the 77SS knockoffs, Bourbon Street Beat (by far my favorite of the three). When that was canceled after one season, he took his Rex Randolph character over to 77SS for another season. Much as I like the actor and the character, I kind of think he was overkill on a show where we already had Stu and Jeff, Kookie and the rest.

 

On The Big Valley he's my favorite of the three brothers, but I feel like Nick and especially Heath had better and more interesting characters and episodes. Maybe when you're making a western (a soapy one, but still) it's not as easy to write stories for a level-headed attorney character. It was sensible casting though - Long wasn't exactly going to be believable as a rough-and-tumble cowboy type, so if you wanted to cast him in a western, slick con man or lawyer was a good way to go.

 

A movie a lot of people might have seen him in without paying too much attention to him is the Vincent Price House on Haunted Hill. Not an especially memorable role, but a decent-sized part in a memorable film.

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nicoley, I'd say the primary difference between Young and Long is that the former often played more cynical characters, though I suppose some might consider that "slimy", and the latter often more the "straight arrow".

 

(...and I always appreciate when actors can carry off that whole "cynical" thing...and the very reason I also really like Bill Holden)

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Richard Long was sort of the safe-for-work Gig Young. He might've be able to stay neck and neck with Young when it came to debonair repartee and charming smirks. But Young had a depth of emotion that Long did not -- he would never as been as effective as Young in They Shoot Horses Don't They.

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Richard Long fans need to see ALL I DESIRE. He plays the boyfriend of Barbara Stanwyck's daughter, and there is a charming scene where he dances with Stanwyck.

Yes, good recommendation. That's a film TCM should air. Richard Carlson plays the father of the girl. Douglas Sirk directed. 

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Richard Long was sort of the safe-for-work Gig Young. He might've be able to stay neck and neck with Young when it came to debonair repartee and charming smirks. But Young had a depth of emotion that Long did not -- he would never as been as effective as Young in They Shoot Horses Don't They.

I'm still waiting to see Jimmy Cagney's Come Fill the Cup (1951) which featured Gig Young's early Oscar nominated performance.   He may have been great in that one too?

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I'm still waiting to see Jimmy Cagney's Come Fill the Cup (1951) which featured Gig Young's early Oscar nominated performance.   He may have been great in that one too?

 

WAIT! I thought this thread was supposed to be about Richard Long here...NOT that "slimy" Gig Young?!!!

 

So, WHO was it that introduced THAT "slimy" guy into this discussion, HUH?!

 

 

(...oh...wait...never mind)

 

LOL

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WAIT! I thought this thread was supposed to be about Richard Long here...NOT that "slimy" Gig Young?!!!

 

So, WHO was it that introduced THAT "slimy" guy into this discussion, HUH?!

 

 

(...oh...wait...never mind)

 

LOL

they were separated at birth, weren't they?

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they were separated at birth, weren't they?

 

Yeah, but word is Gig went right from the milk bottle TO "the bottle".

 

(...although, seeing as how Gig DID outlive Richard, I suppose bein' a major drunk, well apparently at least more than Richard was anyway, wasn't a major factor in their individual longevity, huh)

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nicoley, I'd say the primary difference between Young and Long is that the former often played more cynical characters, though I suppose some might consider that "slimy", and the latter often more the "straight arrow".

 

Rex Randolph has a cynical/sarcastic element to him, which is maybe the difference between Rex and Stuart Bailey on 77SS, who are otherwise both on the suave side. Jarrod Barkley is straight arrow though.

 

I've seen Come Fill the Cup (big Cagney fan). It'd be great if TCM would air it. It's definitely worth seeing for the performances - Cagney, Young, and James Gleason are all excellent.

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Yeah, but word is Gig went right from the milk bottle TO "the bottle".

 

(...although, seeing as how Gig DID outlive Richard, I suppose bein' a major drunk, well apparently at least more than Richard was anyway, wasn't a major factor in their individual longevity, huh)

The story is that the only ones to not get terribly sick when shooting The African Queen were Bogie and Huston because they drank nothing but whiskey.

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