Dr. Rich Edwards

June 5 TCM Film Noir Discussions for #NoirSummer for All 13 Films

320 posts in this topic

The filming style of Dark Passage is so refreshing to view in terms of the black and white presentation and the POV angle compared to many movies made in the same time period that are so sterile, fake and canned.

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Watched Journey into Fear for the first time. Did TCM show a remake of this recently? It seems like I saw the end of that one. I have to confess I had a hard time getting into this one. I got the Blade Runner like scene that Danilo Castro mentioned (it was cool). And I can see the noir "man in crisis" aspect that could be the precursor for the noir we know now but that's it. Am I missing something?

 

Unlike the Maltese Falcon that has it all ~ a femme fatale, interesting villains and a hard boiled detective. Way more hard boiled than say Nick and Nora Charles. :)

Why the switch in public taste I wonder? Could it be a sign of the times? I'm thinking with the war in Europe and questions at home -should we enter should we not- maybe people just wanted someone with a stronger hand to take charge. Or maybe being a history nerd film nerd makes me read too much into things

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"It's a Fake, It's a Fake" I found it ironic that Syndey Greenstreet sounded fake delivering that line in the Maltese Falcon.

This was his first time ever being in a movie. (The Maltese Falcon of all films!! Loool) He was shaking on set,and Humphrey would have to calm him. Amazing.
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That how you want to view films,from an overly analytical academics point of view. I don't.

 

I don't either.  This is why I mention the use of 'classic noir'.     To me the term 'classic noir' is an example of an overly analytical academic way of looking at movies.     So I guess we agree after all.

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I cant see the TCM program, but Isaw many movies that are my favourites: Double Indemnity, Out of the Past, Detour, Sorry, wrong number, The Phantom Lady, Scarlett Street, The big heat, The woman at the window (in fact almost all of Lang), Stranger on the third floor... And whether or not specifically noir, obviously High Sierra, The Maltese Falcon, The Enforcer, Desesperates Hours, The killers, The Asphalt Jungle, among others...

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Hey folks! 

Hope that all of you plan on watching the TCM Premiere of the restoration of WOMAN ON THE RUN tonight w/Ann Sheridan & Dennis O'Keefe! Eddie Muller, Czar of Noir & head of the Film Noir Foundation, is gonna intro this bad boy, and tell you *how* special it is!!

 

It's a GORGEOUS film restoration and your opportunity to take part in viewing what can be done when an organization works hard to save a truly great work, something that institutions like TCM, the Film Noir Foundation & the UCLA Film & Television Archive regularly prioritize.

 

If you happen to be hooked up to that crazy social media twitter thing, a few of us are going to be livetweeting starting at 7:15 PST/10:15 EST. My name is Ariel Schudson and I am the Nancy Mysel Legacy Scholar and a proud part of the Film Noir Foundation. I will be assisting with helpful bits & pieces about the preservation & restoration experience. Twitter-wise, you can find me at @sinaphile

 

I know that the incomparable and amazing TCM Programmer Millie DiChirico is going to be tweeting and you can find *her* at @milliedechirico. She's a rock star and a huge part of why #SummerOfDarkness is here and brilliant so...love that lady! I know I do!

 

See you tonight! Gonna be killer....uh, maybe that was the wrong word...or the right one?

 

Forever in film,

Ariel

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A great TCM lineup of some of my all time favorites (High Sierra, The Maltese Falcon) and some new ones that I've been meaning to see (Journey Into Fear, about a third of the way through Johnny Eager). I thought Journey Into Fear was excellent, particularly the action driven sequences that carry some heavy Wellesian influence (even though Norman Foster technically directed it). Keep a particular eye out if you're a Blade Runner fan, as the rainy building bound finale will carry some striking similarities down to the exact shot.

Also taking a bit of a detour here, but does anyone else not get a film noir vibe from High Sierra? It's an amazing movie and both Bogart and Lupino are heartbreaking in the lead roles, but for me director Raoul Walsh just can't escape the gangster bound ties of the story despite his great attempt. Coupled with You Only Live Once (1937), Dead End (1937), and They Drive by Night (1940), I think this group of great pictures represents the transition period of crime drama from hardened 30's gangsters to 40's tortured antiheroes. They aren't fully one or the other, which makes for a fascinating blend of tropes and styles that is still great to watch. In short, I love High Sierra, but I'm not fully convinced that it's a noir through and through.

I'm gonna get back to Robert Taylor and Van Heflin shooting verbal barbs at each other now, have a good one guys!

I'm really looking forward to Seeing Johnny Eager as a result of this post: I was just explaining to my wife that I thought Blade Runner (love that film) is a good example of a modern Noir. And I'm certain I saw an exact reproduction of one of the scenes I saw today - I think it was one of Bette Davis's scenes in The Letter - in Blade Runner. 

Like you, I didn't get any hint of Noir from High Sierra: I've seen other comments but to me It's just a pretty straightforward gangster flick, no matter Bogie's motives or ending. Perhaps TCM/Canvas threw this one in to see what we'd say about it! 

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I cant see the TCM program, but Isaw many movies that are my favourites: Double Indemnity, Out of the Past, Detour, Sorry, wrong number, The Phantom Lady, Scarlett Street, The big heat, The woman at the window (in fact almost all of Lang), Stranger on the third floor... And whether or not specifically noir, obviously High Sierra, The Maltese Falcon, The Enforcer, Desesperates Hours, The killers, The Asphalt Jungle, among others...

I don't watch TCM either. I just pull up movies I want to see all the time on the net,or grab at a library. One time I let "The Big Sleep" re-play itself in my PS3 for a week straight non-stop. Now I'm even playing the audio from films in my car as I'm driving. Loooool Hilarious...
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Johnny Eager. 

 

Loved Lana Turner. She was perfect for the role and her breakdown is effective. Van Heflin and Robert Taylor's bromance was palpable and Heflin's performance - down to the tears at the end with the pan to the Policeman's badge (711!), was inspiring.

 

Hate, hate, hate that she gets punched. Despite the protagonist trying to make good at the end, I don't think it was justified.

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So, speaking of unredeemed protagonists, do we think that Johnny is redeemed by his sacrifice? Does the fact that he doesn't live to experience it take away from his redemption? I like that the dog is the beginning of his humanity. The previous post mentioned the bromance between Van and Robert. Watching that reminded me of a discussion of Double Indemnity that I participated in at one of Robert Osborne's Classic Film Festivals in Athens, Georgia. He had a guest that helped him introduce the film and lead a discussion after. I will do some research and see if I can find that person's name. The guest pointed out that DI was really a love story between MacMurray and Robinson because Robinson felt about him like a son and was so heartbroken at his downfall. Today's film felt very much a love story between Van and Robert, much more so to me than that between him and Lana. Like a brother or a friend, Van's character wanting so much to find a bit of humanity in him. Was it his love for Lana that finally began to break through his heartlessness? Or was it perhaps his feelings for Van, his only friend? And I have to be a starry-eyed fan here for a moment: Robert Taylor is simply breathtaking!

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Tonight I will be watching the recommended Scarlet Street and L.A. Confidential-- looking forward to discussions!

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I've been watching the whole lineup today, and I've noticed with M to Johnny Eager certain themes and artistic styles growing in the chronological order I thought I I've would give. M, indeed laid the foundations it's obvious! The use of light and shadow, the use of unusual camera angles, the dirty, dangerous city are obviously themes and styles. But what also noticed the story of the inner person. From Lorre's compulsion to kill little children to Gabin trying not to kill (basically due to genetic problems) we see evil is ever there no matter how a person looks. Film noir is about what makes us tick, what makes do what we do, I think that's part of why it was so popular! For Betty Davis it was love, all comsuming passion. Or the Eurasian women who hated her, we are all capable of being biblical Cains. Stranger on the Third Floor was a new one for me to see, and even in that I notice our hero dreams he committed murder! This film was the first one our lineup to show a flashback with a very extended dream sequence was impressive! We know Lorre's an immediate target for a murderer but the film points to the concepts of a normal looking man capable being one. High Sierra is a important because Bogart's a likeable antihero. He's a criminal we like, but he doesn't have a problem killing for his own ends. This antihero concept would feature quite large in film noir. The Maltese Falcon features Boggy as a detective yet still antihero. Boggy certainly created the standard for film noir leading man. Johnny Eager is another likeable antihero until he tricks Lana Turner, but in doing so we see her heart and her love for him. He never really loved anyone before until she's totally willing to give up her saneness for him, that he really, really falls for her. We all can't help ourselves for the choices of people we fall in love with, and sometimes, there are consequences for our choices.  All these themes feature large on .the canvas of these films. One of my favorite films "Vertigo" follows a similar theme. Finally the city starts to feature (although with exception of M) as setting and character in Falcon, and Eager. I love the whole street scene at the end in Eager. It's nighttime-sounds of clanking subway trains, stream rising from the vents, and it's wet and dirty! I loved it! Well that my summary so far!

 

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I saw the entire STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR today. I'd seen the ending previously when I caught it on tv but never saw it from the start. Today, I was blown away by it! Not only were the dream sequences and voice-overs intensely noir, but they evoked all kinds of emotional reactions in me. The desperation, the fear, the suffocating intensity were marvelous. It really brought the ending into focus. And even though I find Peter Lore to be creepy in many of his roles, I almost thought his creepiness was secondary to the intense thoughts and "illusions" of the main male character.

 

I have seen HIGH SIERRA before and honestly never thought of it as a noir film. To me, it belongs more in the gangster/crime category. Still, an interesting movie.

 

After reading many comments here, I also have a greater appreciation for M which I re-watched today. Funny how you can watch a movie and miss so many little things until someone points them out. My love of that film grew stronger today thanks to the #NoirSummer class.

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I'm not an expert of film noir; in fact, this is the first time I've really studied it in depth, even though I'm acquainted with characteristics of it. But I am really enjoying how these films are connecting together! In watching Nora Prentiss (even though it's still on), it's interesting to me how Nora doesn't look at all similar to Richard's wife when he first meets her; the contrast (even minute with the light hair - worn down and flowing, sheer-like costumes) slowly reduces as Richard gets more involved with her. Right now, they're at the night club and Nora is starting to dress and sound an awful lot like Richard's wife. It seems that the slow build up and contrast is a common theme in the movies I've watched today. Still suspenseful, but it's not "in your face", if that makes sense.

 

I didn't get to watch "M", but in looking at the opening scene, it's really cold and detached - which I assume is a killer characteristic. The lack of sound in the opening except for the singing, clock, and cars makes it seem almost institutional; it's very unnatural. 

 

So many people have made some really interesting (and deep) comments! I'm really excited to learn more as we move along :)

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I work 10 hour shifts on Fridays, so I won't get to watch much in 'real time'.  I've seen every film they've shown today except 'La Bete Humaine'...which I have on DVD and just haven't watched yet! 

 

I've finished the They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? 250 noir list, so there probably won't be many first viewings for me.  I joined the course to learn more about my favorite film style...and for fun!

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Watching the scene in Nora Prentiss when the bandages are removed - this reminds me of several Twilight Zone episodes.....

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I'm happy to hear this. I've always watched Woman on the Run on a poor quality print, excited to see what it looks like

 

 

Hey folks! 

Hope that all of you plan on watching the TCM Premiere of the restoration of WOMAN ON THE RUN tonight w/Ann Sheridan & Dennis O'Keefe! Eddie Muller, Czar of Noir & head of the Film Noir Foundation, is gonna intro this bad boy, and tell you *how* special it is!!

 

It's a GORGEOUS film restoration and your opportunity to take part in viewing what can be done when an organization works hard to save a truly great work, something that institutions like TCM, the Film Noir Foundation & the UCLA Film & Television Archive regularly prioritize.

 

If you happen to be hooked up to that crazy social media twitter thing, a few of us are going to be livetweeting starting at 7:15 PST/10:15 EST. My name is Ariel Schudson and I am the Nancy Mysel Legacy Scholar and a proud part of the Film Noir Foundation. I will be assisting with helpful bits & pieces about the preservation & restoration experience. Twitter-wise, you can find me at @sinaphile

 

I know that the incomparable and amazing TCM Programmer Millie DiChirico is going to be tweeting and you can find *her* at @milliedechirico. She's a rock star and a huge part of why #SummerOfDarkness is here and brilliant so...love that lady! I know I do!

 

See you tonight! Gonna be killer....uh, maybe that was the wrong word...or the right one?

 

Forever in film,

Ariel

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That is an amazing piece of triva considering he WAS Gutman. He comes across as a seasoned actor!

 

 

This was his first time ever being in a movie. (The Maltese Falcon of all films!! Loool) He was shaking on set,and Humphrey would have to calm him. Amazing.

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Nora Prentiss needs a remastering. I am also noting a rhythm with the films that I have seen so far - there is a rather long set-up where we see the "normal" lives of our protagonists, and then things start to really get interesting and unusual - certainly a common demominator in many Film Noirs. Scarlet Street demonstrated that as well. Franz Waxman's music is strong - maybe too strong. It would be nice to see this film remastered someday.

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Saw Nora Prentiss for the first time. Love it! I like the way that after Richard "killed himself" and became Robert he changed both physically and emotionally until he was no longer Richard. At the very end when he was speaking to Laura behind the screen Richard was almost completely obscured.

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I am pretty  late to the fray, but due to a very busy day I am just now able to begin watching the fiilms,  I did watch La Bete Humaine and thoroughly enjoyed it.  Looking forward to the course material to come later. 

 

 

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I'm not an expert of film noir; in fact, this is the first time I've really studied it in depth, even though I'm acquainted with characteristics of it. But I am really enjoying how these films are connecting together! In watching Nora Prentiss (even though it's still on), it's interesting to me how Nora doesn't look at all similar to Richard's wife when he first meets her; the contrast (even minute with the light hair - worn down and flowing, sheer-like costumes) slowly reduces as Richard gets more involved with her. Right now, they're at the night club and Nora is starting to dress and sound an awful lot like Richard's wife. It seems that the slow build up and contrast is a common theme in the movies I've watched today. Still suspenseful, but it's not "in your face", if that makes sense.

 

I didn't get to watch "M", but in looking at the opening scene, it's really cold and detached - which I assume is a killer characteristic. The lack of sound in the opening except for the singing, clock, and cars makes it seem almost institutional; it's very unnatural. 

 

So many people have made some really interesting (and deep) comments! I'm really excited to learn more as we move along :)

I am no expert either, but i did notice the change in the clothes.  She wanted to look respectable.  I hope you get to watch M, I found it interesting.  Dark yes, but excellent acting by Peter Lorre.  Always thought it was such a shame that his greatest acting role was his first role.  

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Saw Nora Prentiss for the first time. Love it! I like the way that after Richard "killed himself" and became Robert he changed both physically and emotionally until he was no longer Richard. At the very end when he was speaking to Laura behind the screen Richard was almost completely obscured.

I was disappointed in Nora Prentis.  Don't know why but expected more.  Will have to think about this movie a bit more.

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For those without a DVR or access to TCM, many of these movies are available on Netlfix or Amazon Prime. 

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