Dr. Rich Edwards

June 5 TCM Film Noir Discussions for #NoirSummer for All 13 Films

320 posts in this topic

That is an amazing piece of triva considering he WAS Gutman. He comes across as a seasoned actor!

 

 

Yes,they just happened to see him performing theater in England. Poor guy,next thing he knows he is in some big Hollywood movie scared to death. The other actors all really loved Sydney though. He was a very nice gentle man,from what I've read about him. I love all those character actors...they really are what makes a lot of films great.
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I love Ann Sheridan. Her sarcasm and wit are absolutely amazing. Watching Woman on the Run again. Last time I saw this was in January at Noir City. Great to see on the big screen. Nora Prentiss was new for me. Good film; a little melodramatic, but the concept was pretty unique. I hadn't seen or read a plot like that.

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That's what I love about Nora Prentiss, unexpected- didnt think it would end the way it did- but hey it's noir

 

I love Ann Sheridan. Her sarcasm and wit are absolutely amazing. Watching Woman on the Run again. Last time I saw this was in January at Noir City. Great to see on the big screen. Nora Prentiss was new for me. Good film; a little melodramatic, but the concept was pretty unique. I hadn't seen or read a plot like that.

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Excatly!!!

 

Yes,they just happened to see him performing theater in England. Poor guy,next thing he knows he is in some big Hollywood movie scared to death. The other actors all really loved Sydney though. He was a very nice gentle man,from what I've read about him. I love all those character actors...they really are what makes a lot of films great.

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Saw Woman on the Run. Like others I loved the dialogue and the dog. I also loved the sightseeing tour of San Francisco. A carnival made creepy looking by the night lights and odd angles is a great place for climax. A dichotomy between danger and fun. Of course in film noir danger is fun. First time seeing this movie and I really enjoyed it.next up one of my favorites ~ Dark Passge

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This is my first venture into film Noir, Lady on the run, was great, the plot was very good, the dialogue was sharp and clever, the lighting and camera angles were great as well.  The ending was a bit short and the last scene with the laughing female mannequin was weird but that is Noir.  The sense of peril and laughing while on the roller coaster was an excellent mix.  This is fun, even for a first timer.  

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I was disappointed in Nora Prentis. Don't know why but expected more. Will have to think about this movie a bit more.

I do have to say it started a little slow and I was disappointed with the Clark Kent syndrom. Like Superman he didn't look SO different that his wife wouldn't recognized in court (but that's Hollywood).So I can see your viewpoint too.

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...  Overall, the tihing that struck me most is the lack of sound in M.  There is no film score highlighting suspenseful moments or sad moments and manipulating our emotions.  Instead there is the song of the chidlren, the whistled tune of the murderer, the cukoo clock and school bells marking time, etc.  I liked the silence in between and that I was not prompted to think by constant music but it allowed to see myself where the truth would lie. 

I agree the lack of a music track allows for us to form our own views and not be guided by a musical score to view a scene one way or another. Scores can be a distraction and are tools of the director to make the viewer go down a purposeful path of the director’s choising.

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Out of this first round of films, I chose to watch "The Letter" first (as I concentrate on films I haven't seen).

 

Seen from a noir perspective, Leslie Crosbie is an interesting character. In some ways she's the classic femme fatale, leading men into moral transgressions. In others, she's a classic noir protagonist (a role almost never taken by women) who makes a bad moral choice herself and then follows the consequences to the end.

 

Ultimately though, this is at best proto-noir, and is much more a melodrama, with all the good and bad that entails.

 

The theme of the moonlight from the opening returns at the end for a visual coda.

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I just finished watching "M". I have never been a Peter Lorre fan but he was fantastic in this. The ending left me with the feeling of "who is guilty?" "Who are then bad guys?" and "who is responsible?" I consider myself pretty much a law and order person but this movie had so many twists into gray from black and white. The gangsters are trying to stop the murderer (good) but it is because it is cutting into their profits from crime(bad). The cops (good guys) are raiding clubs to look for the murderer but instead are arresting some minor criminals (no papers? off to the precienct!) The everyday towns people are jumping on the accusation bandwagon and attacking another just because someone else makes an accusation. The truly "bad guy" in the movie and his "defense counsel" have an explanation of why his crimes are different that the mob court. Lorre's character isn't responsible because he cannot help it. Can someone driven by a demon (or mental illness) be held truly responsible for their actions? There is also a bit of responsibility put on the murdered children. At one point someone states that children can be easily led astray with candy or apples.

 

The final condemnation of the " good guys" being responsible for the bad comes right at the end with the condemnation of the parents. They should have watched their children better and then the children would still be around (I personally do not believe that and consider it blaming victim but it is definitely a theme in the movie.) The final lines include the condemnation of parents for the murder of their children and the parents own self condemnation over the guilt

they feel over their children's death.

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Just watched M.<snip>

I was struck by the ineffective work of the police department especially the constant raids. Then, in the end, the people they were persecuting were the ones who caught the criminal.I wonder if that wasn't a comment on the lack of trust in the government given the time, 1931 when the Nazi Party was the second largest party. It also makes me wonder if the final comment about watching the children was not only a cautionary comment about predators but dictators as well. Film-noir became the vehicle for filmmakers to explore the darker side of humanity. Was Lange doing that here with not only child predators but the rise of the Nazi Patry. Aftrer all, a few years later he and PL left Getmany because of the Nazis. Or am I reading too much into this?

I don’t think you are reading too much into the possible undertone of criticism of the Nazis. Although they were not in full power at the time the film was made Lang was obviously aware of their growing influence. Yes Lang and Lorre both Jewish left Germany by 1934.

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In “M” one of the things that made this move standout for me was the language used by the criminal element true profanity that would not be heard in American films of the same time. This I thought added an air of authenticity.  

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... this movie had so many twists into gray from black and white. 

 

One of the interesting things of the genre I think is that everything is in stark contrast and chiaroscuro, and yet there is so much gray!

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Johnny Eager turned out to just be mediocre, and it indulged a little too much in the surface level gangster tropes of the 30's for my liking. Luckily, Van Heflin and Edward Arnold are both great and salvage what they can single-handedly. I also noticed how crisp and clear this copy was compared to something like...

Nora Prentiss. This movie was far superior, and it's clearly in desperate need of a remaster. Cinematographer James Wong Howe really does a number on the crushed blacks that fill up most of the film's frames, and I get goosebumps thinking about how great it would look restored. I recorded Woman on the Beach (that's right, on a VHS) so I'll get to that one later. I'm anxious to see it based off of the positive feedback everyone seems to be giving.

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Wow! We went over the 14,000 mark for people in the course. That's a success in my book,which means TCM will more than likely do another course. Well good for us fellow film lovers. ????

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Johnny Eager turned out to just be mediocre, and it indulged a little too much in the surface level gangster tropes of the 30's for my liking. Luckily, Van Heflin and Edward Arnold are both great and salvage what they can single-handedly. I also noticed how crisp and clear this copy was compared to something like...

Nora Prentiss. This movie was far superior, and it's clearly in desperate need of a remaster. Cinematographer James Wong Howe really does a number on the crushed blacks that fill up most of the film's frames, and I get goosebumps thinking about how great it would look restored. I recorded Woman on the Beach (that's right, on a VHS) so I'll get to that one later. I'm anxious to see it based off of the positive feedback everyone seems to be giving.

"That's right,on a VHS" loooool ...any way that works I say.

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I'm on the fence on High Sierra as a noir. Yes, Mad Dog is doomed. But I'm struggling real hard with this one. My reasons, Ida Lupina is too much in love with Bogie in this film. She'd never do anything to hurt him. The atmosphere is not noirish. It's a great movie. Didn't have that opinion before.

But if Mildred Pierce can be a woman's noir I guess High Sierra can be an action noir.

I say High Sierra is 69.9% noir.

 

 

 

 

Forget Marie (Ida Lupino) as Bogart's foil.  The women that did him in was Vera (Joan Leslie.)  To me, the lighting doesn't really remind me of film noir but who cares?  It's a great movie, no matter how you classify it.  BTW, this was the last time that Bogie ever accepted second billing.

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Johnny Eager turned out to just be mediocre, and it indulged a little too much in the surface level gangster tropes of the 30's for my liking. Luckily, Van Heflin and Edward Arnold are both great and salvage what they can single-handedly. I also noticed how crisp and clear this copy was compared to something like...

 

 

Wow, I had the complete opposite reaction, Johnny Eager was the biggest surprise for me. It belongs on a continuum that includes Scorcese, Oliver Stone, and Abel Ferrara. Yes, Van Heflin was the best part, and it may have indulged in cliche, but I thought it was crisply presented and incredibly entertaining from start to finish. I knew Johnny had no happy ending, due to the plot restrictions of the time, but I've rarely wanted a guy to get away with it quite so much. Plus I really appreciated the twist that it was his good deeds that finally did him in. 

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Wow! We went over the 14,000 mark for people in the course. That's a success in my book,which means TCM will more than likely do another course. Well good for us fellow film lovers.

Yes! I hope they do this again! Maybe they'll have one every summer... we will have to see! 

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I recorded all the films I either haven't seen or don't own! I haven't had the time to watch any today but I'm going to have a marathon this weekend, or at least try to watch all of them. I'm so excited for the course to really get started! 

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Week one is over, and I've a lot of films to catch up with but I cannot wait for week two. Loving this so far!

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I had never seen this film before and after viewing last night, I don't think it'll ever be one of my all-time favorites.  However, I did find one scene in particular really stuck with me and made me want to explore (in my mind, at least) the life of a more minor character from the film - the wife.  That courtroom scene where she was asked if she had ever seen the defendant.  Wow, what was that look?  Recognition, he looks like my dead husband?  Shock due to the horrible scars of this stranger?  I am inclined to believe she knew him but denied it, choosing to save herself the humiliation and her children the sadness of having a husband/father who would choose to leave them.  Not to mention the insurance money.  Did all that go through her mind in that split second?  I like to think so.

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Nora Prentiss.  - Some things just stick with you.  

I had never seen this film before and after viewing last night, I don't think it'll ever be one of my all-time favorites.  However, I did find one scene in particular really stuck with me and made me want to explore (in my mind, at least) the life of a more minor character from the film - the wife.  That courtroom scene where she was asked if she had ever seen the defendant.  Wow, what was that look?  Recognition, he looks like my dead husband?  Shock due to the horrible scars of this stranger?  I am inclined to believe she knew him but denied it, choosing to save herself the humiliation and her children the sadness of having a husband/father who would choose to leave them.  Not to mention the insurance money.  Did all that go through her mind in that split second?  I like to think so.

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Yes! I hope they do this again! Maybe they'll have one every summer... we will have to see!

 

They could do a dozen subjects: silents, the 70s, method acting, directors, foreign by country, musicals, actors... There's enough to keep us bust for a decade.

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