jaygill1

Coming soon to select BIG screens in the US, "Double Indemnity"!

58 posts in this topic

ugh. That stinks! We saw Casablanca on the big screen about a year ago and it was incredible. Very good quality. I love to see the grain in the film (---> photo nerd alert) :) I am planning on seeing Double Indemnity if it is in my area.

I just got tickets for my family and me to see Double Indemnity here in Albuquerque.  I hope my experience is better than yours!!  I really like this movie and haven't seen it in quite a while, just bought the DVD.  I've promised myself that I will not drive my familyt crazy by telling them everything I've learned about film noir before and after we see the picture!!

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I got 4 tickets to the July 19th, 2pm matinee at the AMC Burbank 16. :)

http://www.fathomevents.com/event/double-indemnity

http://www.fathomevents.com/event/double-indemnity

 

My husband and I will be at the 7pm showing that day at the same location :) Hoping since we live in the entertainment industry area, we'll get a good quality showing. This is also our first time going to any Fathom Events item.

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There a Film Noir Festival in my neck of the woods! (Vancouver) running August - September.

Just wondering if there are any local fans out there. Here's your chance to see a lot of the flicks on the big screen @ Pacific Cinematheque.

 

"The feverish, fatalistic world of Film Noir returns to The Cinematheque for another moody, menacing, angst-filled August. Celebrating one of the American cinema’s richest and most creative periods in all its stylish, seductive, and cynical glories, this year’s Noir season features 12 hard-boiled classics from noir’s 1940s/1950s heyday plus two small sidebars spotlighting noir’s surprisingly wide reach and lurid legacy."

 

Full schedule here...

 

http://www.thecinematheque.ca/film-noir-2015

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Anyone going to see Double Indemnity in Cary this Monday evening?  I purchased my tickets today for the 7pm show.  Curious to know if any of my fellow students will be attending?

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My local Movie Tavern showed Double Indemnity on the big screen today. It was the TCM presentation with an intro and outro. I'd only ever seen it on a TV or computer monitor or small screen in a classroom. It was great to see it this way. I was particularly taken with Edward G Robinson's supporting role. If it comes to a theatre near you, see it.

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I just had the pleasure of seeing Double Indemnity  this afternoon at my local movie theater.  It was even better than I remembered!!  Maybe seeing it on the "big screen" had something to do with that. My brother and sister in law came with me and really enjoyed the film, too.  I am so grateful to TM for making this available throughout the country!!  After the movie, we went to a restaurant for burgers for dinner.  The waitress, who couldn't have been older than 19 asked if we had been to the movies.  We told her that we had just watched Double Indemnity.  Imagine my surprise and delight when she said she loved that movie.  It turns out that she loves the old classics, including noir, and Double Indemnity is one of her favorites!!  I am thrilled to be learning just how many young people "love this stuff!!"

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Wow! We really enjoyed seeing Double Indemnity on the big screen. I have seen the movie several times before but my husband had not. We both loved it and there is nothing like seeing these actors the way they were meant to be.

Thank you TCM for bringing these movies back to us the way we should see them. I hope that you always continue and I wish there were more!

Since I have been taking the class on film noir we are learning that there isn't a set definition for this type of movie. Is it a genre,style or possibly a movement.  I think if you put a copy of this movie beside it you would have a great start. Then everyone would have to watch  and fall in love like the rest of us!

In the meantime we are working on cracking the case of film noir. This tomatoe is loving it and it didn't cost any lettuce, baby!;)

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Sadly, I'm too far from a participating theatre to see this today, but I'm happy for all of you who can!

 

In solidarity, I'll be revisiting the DVD - not the same experience, I know, but what a great movie to see again and again.

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Very excited to be attending the showing this evening in Cary, NC!  If any of my fellow students are attending I hope to see you there.  I'll be wearing our class Summer of Darkness T-shirt!

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My daughter-in-law and I are attending the 2:00 pm C.S.T. showing of DOUBLE INDEMITY today. We are going to a Cinemark cinema in Tupelo, MS. the birthplace of Elvis Presley. I am looking forward to seeing my first classic film on the big screen.

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I just saw "Double Indemnity" on the big screen.  What a movie!!  It had all the elements:  great script, direction, actors.  I was caught the entire time it screened.  I felt what modern pictures come across like this.  Then I went home and finished watching E.T. (a great picture).

 

The audience laughed when they learned the Glendale Spanish home cost $30,000.  I remember when a house cost $15,000 in the 1950's.  I always get a kick out of seeing the grocery store scene in "Yours, Mine, and Ours" when they pay for four full baskets of groceries, and it only costs $126.24.

 

When I first saw Barbara Stanwyck as a blond in this movie, it bothered me. Blond did not suit her. But when I saw her at the theater, her blond hair definitely made her a dangerous femme fatale.  I will never think negatively of her blond hair again.  

 

I also wondered if my mother saw this picture at age 22 (the year it came out).  I will have to ask my aunt what pictures they saw.

 

 

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      I’ll be seeing Double Indemnity on the big screen tonight in Overland Park, Kansas.  Even if you’ve seen this movie before at home, watching it on the big screen is an entirely different experience.  (I saw Casablanca on the big screen after watching it multiple times on a television screen and it was like seeing it for the first time.)

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Saw it yesterday on the big screen and it was great. I was disappointed in the low turnout though. I want to see this continue and it would be nice if it was more often. Maybe if theaters advertised it better?

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Saw it yesterday on the big screen and it was great. I was disappointed in the low turnout though. I want to see this continue and it would be nice if it was more often. Maybe if theaters advertised it better?

I also was disappointed at the low turn out yesterday at my theater--only 14 people, mostly "senior citizens."  I don't think my local theater advertised it at all.  The only ads I saw for it were on TCM.  The audience I was part of also had a good laugh at the $30,000 price tag of the house....

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I'm hoping to see the film tonight at 7 o'clock. The last time I saw the film was 2012 in my film noir class in college, so it'll be exciting to see it again on the big screen. I'm not expecting to see too many other people there, though. Occasionally my theatre has a classic cinema series but people really only come out for the bigger titles (like Gone with the Wind and The Wizard of Oz). The last film in the most recent series, Tootise, had about four people in the audience, including myself!

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Saw it yesterday on the big screen and it was great. I was disappointed in the low turnout though. I want to see this continue and it would be nice if it was more often. Maybe if theaters advertised it better?

 

As did I. I saw it in San Francisco's Van Ness theatre yesterday, and when I saw the very few people in the theatre, I literally shouted, "What? That's it? No appreciation for the classics!" It was also poorly executed. They started the film 20 minutes late, and there was no sound. There was Robert Osborne's introduction as a silent motion picture. Finally the sound came on mid speech. It was terribly orchestrated. Surprisingly, though, my friend and I were the oldest ones in the theatre (I'm 38 and he's 43). It was nice to see a younger generation's interest in the classics.

 

I've seen Double Indemnity on the big screen a few times before. And each time, the house was packed. However these theatres are old movie houses built in the 1920s (Castro Theatre in San Francisco and Stanford Theatre in Palo Alto). They only show classic films. I think TCM should consider old movie houses for their presentations since they already occur in limited release. These old movie houses also promote their schedules better.

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"Double Indemnity" captured a snapshot of 1940s Los Angeles. On one hand you had the stucco homes with palm trees contrasted with the office where Walter Neff worked and his shabby apartment with the door that swung outside (instead of inside). One of my favorite under-appreciated movies is 1995's "Devil In a Blue Dress" with Denzel Washington. "Devil" is set in post-war Los Angeles and looks at a slice of life of African-Americans in the 1940s. Washington's Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins was your typical hard-core private detective and Don Cheadle steals his scenes as Rawlins' questionable backup man, Mouse Alexander. Like the movies of film noir, "Devil" pays homage to the architecture and interiors of the structures - particularly the pre-war Craftsman bungalows that populated working-class Los Angeles.

 

The door swinging outward to Walter's apartment was odd.  But they had to find a way to hide Phyllis from Keyes.  I do not think I have seen anything like that in film noir.  Most doors open inward, unless they are pocket doors.  But it worked in the film.  

 

I thought Edward G. Robinson was nominated for supporting actor, but only Stanwyck was, and she lost to Ingrid Bergman for Gaslight.  Billy Wilder lost as best director to Leo McCarey for Going My Way.  The ironic thing is the actress who played Lola Dietrichson, Jean Heather, also starred in Going My Way.

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"Double Indemnity" captured a snapshot of 1940s Los Angeles. On one hand you had the stucco homes with palm trees contrasted with the office where Walter Neff worked and his shabby apartment with the door that swung outside (instead of inside). One of my favorite under-appreciated movies is 1995's "Devil In a Blue Dress" with Denzel Washington. "Devil" is set in post-war Los Angeles and looks at a slice of life of African-Americans in the 1940s. Washington's Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins was your typical hard-core private detective and Don Cheadle steals his scenes as Rawlins' questionable backup man, Mouse Alexander. Like the movies of film noir, "Devil" pays homage to the architecture and interiors of the structures - particularly the pre-war Craftsman bungalows that populated working-class Los Angeles.

 

I love Devil in a Blue Dress. I agree, it is under-appreciated; it's a great film noir and one that should have a great audience.

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I saw it last night. i had seen it before but not on the big screen. the afternoon turnout was apparently pretty good. the evening screening we went to had about 12 people there.

 

When we left the theatre it was pouring rain and we and to take several dark streets to get home. How idyllic.

 

I forgot how great Edward G. Robinson is in the movie. he chews up scenery inn every scene. for this viewing I paid more attention to the dialogue and interactions between MacMurray and Stanwyck with the knowledge that they had to deal with the code of the time.

 

I was unaware that this was yet another movie George Raft turned down. 

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The missus and I attended the matinee screening of Double Indemnity at the nearest Seattle-Tacoma theater yesterday -- a good excuse to get out of the record-breaking heat and into the air-conditioned theater. I have seen the film several times and at least once on the big screen, but it is always great to see a clean print on the big screen. It was a first for the Missus --she had not seen the movie and loved it. Unfortunately, less than a half dozen others shared the pleasures. Most theater attendees were there for Ant-Man, which apparently is okay for families (it is PG-13).

Do you recall when air conditioning was used as a selling point for theaters in the 50's?

 

I guess even earlier:

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My daughter-in-law and I are attending the 2:00 pm C.S.T. showing of DOUBLE INDEMITY today. We are going to a Cinemark cinema in Tupelo, MS. the birthplace of Elvis Presley. I am looking forward to seeing my first classic film on the big screen.

We went to the Cinemark Cinema, and there were only three other ladies in attendance. I have been reading that low attendance occurred in other cities too. What a shame, because they rarely make movies like DOUBLE INDEMITY anymore. The last great film noir that I saw was L.A. CONFIDENTIAL 1997. Barbara`s hair was too stiff and unnatural, but I cannot think of another actress who could have done a better acting job than Bab`s. Eddie Muller mentioned Friday night that Barbara is his favorite. The type of film did not matter. Barbara would go between dramas, westerns, film noirs, or comedies with everything she possessed. I remember Kevin Costner`s comment when Barbara was chosen NO. 11 on the AFI`s fifty best actor and actress list in 1999. He said that she was his kind of woman and recognized her beauty. Thank you Fred MacMurray for accepting Billy Wilder`s challenge to stretch his acting talents. Robert Osbourne said in conclusion that Alan Ladd and George Raft were first offered the role of Walter Neff. Fred should have been nominated for his fine contribution to this film.

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We went to the Cinemark Cinema, and there were only three other ladies in attendance. I have been reading that low attendance occurred in other cities too. What a shame, because they rarely make movies like DOUBLE INDEMITY anymore. The last great film noir that I saw was L.A. CONFIDENTIAL 1997. Barbara`s hair was too stiff and unnatural, but I cannot think of another actress who could have done a better acting job than Bab`s. Eddie Muller mentioned Friday night that Barbara is his favorite. The type of film did not matter. Barbara would go between dramas, westerns, film noirs, or comedies with everything she possessed. I remember Kevin Costner`s comment when Barbara was chosen NO. 11 on the AFI`s fifty best actor and actress list in 1999. He said that she was his kind of woman and recognized her beauty. Thank you Fred MacMurray for accepting Billy Wilder`s challenge to stretch his acting talents. Robert Osbourne said in conclusion that Alan Ladd and George Raft were first offered the role of Walter Neff. Fred should have been nominated for his fine contribution to this film.

 

I'm glad Raft passed on the role.  He would have been more stiff and unnatural than Barbara's wig!  

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Saw Double Indemnity at a theater this evening -- similar to what others have reported, low turnout. I mean 3 of us in the audience total! But This has always been a favorite of my husband and mine... don't want to say that it has affected our relationship, but when he starts calling me "Baby.." I know he's doing a Fred MacMurray. I think MacMurray is well cast, and if he had a "nice guy" image beforehand, it only underlines how fatal a femme fatale can be. 

Overall, the acting ensemble lifts this above the normal B-movie. There's not a sour note struck in this film, with Edward G. Robinson superb, great dialogue. it was a good print, I thought, and I appreciated seeing some of the filming techniques that I've learned to appreciate in this class. The scene with Phyllis (Stanwyck) behind the door and Keyes (Robinson) at the elevator was a great example of deep focus, keeping the three parts of the screen in such exquisite sharp focus -- for the first time I was able to understand how this kind of shot keeps the audience equally riveted to each character. I am convinced of what the Prof has said-- that these films were designed for the big screen. In our assignment of trying to define film noir, Double Indemnity has to be one of the canonical examples. I actually drove an hour each way to see this film, but felt that it was essential to my Summer of Darkness, to experience this key film on the Big Screen. Plus, doesn't every class need a good Field Trip?

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So glad I went to see Double Indemnity on the big screen tonight. There were only about 15 of us in the

theatre. Most of the tickets sold at the box office seemed to be for some mess of a movie called

Trainwreck. That bums me out. There might not have been as many people in our theatre but we

definitely were the winners tonight. I will be pondering this film noir classic for the rest of the week.

Thanks to TCM for making these events possible.

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I just had the pleasure of seeing Double Indemnity  this afternoon at my local movie theater.  It was even better than I remembered!!  Maybe seeing it on the "big screen" had something to do with that. My brother and sister in law came with me and really enjoyed the film, too.  I am so grateful to TM for making this available throughout the country!!  After the movie, we went to a restaurant for burgers for dinner.  The waitress, who couldn't have been older than 19 asked if we had been to the movies.  We told her that we had just watched Double Indemnity.  Imagine my surprise and delight when she said she loved that movie.  It turns out that she loves the old classics, including noir, and Double Indemnity is one of her favorites!!  I am thrilled to be learning just how many young people "love this stuff!!"

It's nice to know that some young people appreciate the classics. Usually, if old movies could talk, they would use Rodney Dangerfield's line:  "I don't get no respect!"

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