jaygill1

Coming soon to select BIG screens in the US, "Double Indemnity"!

58 posts in this topic

 

It was also poorly executed. They started the film 20 minutes late, and there was no sound. There was Robert Osborne's introduction as a silent motion picture. Finally the sound came on mid speech. It was terribly orchestrated.

 

Exact same thing happened at our theater. I got up to complalin about the lack of sound and then when they turned the sound on, they didn't restart it so another person got up to request that. Seriously? The tickets were a premium price and the theater can't execute a simple start up??

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I had a wonderful evening at the theater in Cary, NC last night enjoying my first ever viewing of Double Indemnity on the big screen.  It was outstanding.  We didn't have the technical problems others mentioned, and there were at least 30 people in the audience. 

 

I was astounded by how much blacker the blacks were and grayer the grays than in the TCM and DVD viewings I've enjoyed of this film.  It made the movie even better.  In my opinion there is no substitution for seeing a film on the screen it immerses you deeper into the film. 

 

Audience reaction too the 30K house seems to be universal.

 

Thanks TCM for giving us the opportunity to enjoy these wonderful films as they're supposed to be seen.

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I saw Double Indemnity yesterday afternoon with about 6 or 7 other people at Cinemark Tinseltown in Rochester NY. The film stopped streaming about midway through the show and a prompt popped up that identified the movie as being streamed from some source.  The break??? lasted about 5 minutes.  That was when I realized I was watching a really a bad print.  After about 5 mins. one of the patrons had called the main office of the theater, someone came and rebooted the link to continue the movie streaming. Too bad the film was completely grayed out with the night scenes (especially on the train) almost black.  I have seen better prints and a recent TCM showing was much better quality.  What a disappointment, but luckily Fred McMurray's voiceover saved the day.  I looked for clues about the Hayes Code being implemented but saw nothing with this viewing that sprang to mind.  I looked for the wind blowing through the curtains or something like the mirror shots, but nothing popped out at me to show Neff and Phyllis were the victims of Hayes Code censure.  Maybe because the film was so dark with unsharpened focus, I just missed what I was looking for even though the film was on a big screen.  The three shot in deep focus with Robinson, Stanwyck, and McMurray at the apartment elevator was great as I had not noticed how present all the characters were and it was the deep focus that made that shot so suspenseful.

TCM should be able to better monitor the venues in this project and find a way to up the quality of the streaming or prints that are being used. 

 

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Sunday evening, I took my son with me to see "Double Indemnity" at the Cinemark theater in Boca Raton, Florida. I wanted him to see a classic film noir on the big screen, in hopes that the experience would help him understand film noir's attraction for me.

 

I was very surprised to see how few people were in the audience - fewer than fifteen. I had expected the theater to be full, but it seemed that everyone else was going to see "Ant Man" or "Trainwreck." I see that others have commented on the low turnout in the theaters they attended, and I hope this does forebode the end of showing these great old films. 

 

We did not experience any technical issues in the showing of the film, but I expected the quality to be a little better. I had heard that the film was available now in Blu-Ray, which typically has excellent quality, so I was expecting that. The quality was nevertheless good, but I think I will buy the blu-ray version now to see how it compares. We both enjoyed the film, although I think my son was secretly wishing we had bought tickets for "Ant Man."  

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Exact same thing happened at our theater. I got up to complalin about the lack of sound and then when they turned the sound on, they didn't restart it so another person got up to request that. Seriously? The tickets were a premium price and the theater can't execute a simple start up??

That's why I prefer to buy or rent DVDs and watch them in the comfort of my home.

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I saw Double Indemnity last night on the big screen and it was great.

No technical issues whatsoever.  I think they might have screwed up my ticket price; waaaay cheaper than buying online (I purchased it in advance in person.

However, there couldn't have been 10 people in attendance.  When I saw Casablanca at a Fathom Event (in a different city) it was sold out.

 

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I saw Double Indemnity yesterday at a Cinemark theater along with about four other people.

 

I am saddened by the lack of attendance, but I did enjoy the absence of someone crunching their popcorn or wrestling with a bag of candy behind me.

This is a remarkable movie. Perhaps this is the right step by which to educate the movie going public about these wonderful movies which, in my view, will never be duplicated.

 

When seeing both McMurray and Stanwyck on this larger screen, I can readily see how handsome McMurray was and that Stanwyck was a "quiet" beauty. I fail to see Walter Neff portrayed by anyone else but Fred McMurray. As Phyllis, Stanwyck was wicked in a reserved and subtle way.

 

Robert Osborne mentioned the cameo appearance of Raymond Chandler. I understand he was reading a book. However, I couldn't find him and am wondering if someone out there would know where he was. Fortunately, I have the DVD so I can watch it again and try to pinpoint him.

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I went. It was fabulous. My niece was in awe of Barbara Stanwick, but I was in awe of Edward G. Robinson. Something about him giving that performance, especially where he is arguing with their boss about suicide vs. murder, on the big screen was so much more interesting and powerful.

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