Dr. Rich Edwards

June 12 TCM Film Noir Discussions for #NoirSummer for all 14 Films

216 posts in this topic

Gun Crazy

 

The opening scene here draws your attention to the film noir style. The writing, directing, cinematography and camera positioning seems to scream, "Film noir is here to stay."

 

I thought the actions surrounding the bank heist- all of it - was excellently well directed.

 

What about the last five minutes- I thought for a moment I was watching a digital movie. the picture quality was so crisp.

 

John Dall, who was good in "Rope" is even better here in emoting his character's inner struggle with what is right and wrong.

 

The one-take heist scene is a landmark. Was shot on location in a small California town. They used a modified sedan with the rear seats removed and the back extended. The rig with the camera and a jockey saddle for the cameraman was mounted on a greased board to slide forward and back. Loaded with all that equipment and a bunch of crew members in the back and on the roof, it was no mean feat for Peggy Cummins to drive that vehicle in the scene.

 

Dall is great in the part. His career should've gone further.

 

The source material for GUN CRAZY, a story in the respecable "Saturday Evening Post" magazine, was originally a Midwestern tale of three boyhood pals growing up. Its author Mackinlay Kantor also wrote the story that became BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES. The King Bros. had a different vision and brought in new writers, primarily Dalton Trumbo, who condensed the bulk of Kantor's magazine story into a brief opening montage, expanded the crime spree, and made it a story of doomed lovers driven by obsession.

 

With mixed reviews at the time, the movie was eventually recognized as something new and fresh, and it's influence on pictures like BREATHLESS and BONNIE AND CLYDE is apparent. Now its enjoying a new wave of popularity. The still fabulous Peggy Cummins has crossed the ocean several times to attend festival screenings, thanks to the Film NOir Foundation.

http://www.filmnoirfoundation.org/video.html#cummins

 

Eddie Muller's newest book relates the birth, making and legacy of GUN CRAZY in an enjoyable read with plenty of behind-the-scenes pictures and documents. Heartily recommended!

http://eddiemuller.com/guncrazy.html

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wow!! talk about kicking yourself... i also heard he had ganster ties, anyone heard that one?

On George Raft being "stiff"~

 

Old George started out as a dancer believe it or not.  He was on Broadway early in his career.  He was also a functioning illiterate.  I do not know how he read his scripts, but he obviously managed.

 

He was in over eighty movies so apparently, "stiff" was a hot commodity back then and he as two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame - one for movies and another for television.

 

Look up the movies he turned down.  It's shocking.

 

The Sea Wolf

High Sierra

The Maltese Falcon

Double Indemnity

 

Those are only a few of the biggies.

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NIGHTMARE ALLEY

 

Utterly fascinating film! For years it was the "holy grail" of noir enthusiasts, unavailable for viewing outside of film festivals because it was tied up in a legal dispute with the estate of the source novel's author William Lindsay Gresham. One TV airing on AMC slipped through and gave birth to hundreds of poor-quality bootleg VHS's complete with Bob Dorian intro. Then, 10 or so years ago, it was released suddenly and with no fanfare on a Fox DVD. Glad it could be included in the TCM festival this summer!

 

This is another one where a novel / film comparison is rewarding. Gresham, in several novels and a Houdini biography, delved deep into the world of carnivals and sideshows as well as the "spook rackets" that were flourishing at the time. In the 1920s/30s, as in earlier eras, spiritualism seemed to be pervasive in American society and permeated everything from medicine and psychiatry to Christian revivalism and self-help philosophies. It's a fascinating aspect of Amercian history.

 

The novel NGIHTMARE ALLEY is full of revealing details about the mechanics of the various trickeries Carlisle employed in the course of his career. It also goes into Carlisle's childhood where what he became originated -- in the family.

 

Manipulation and exploitation of belief is one of the most fertile grounds for film noir material.

 

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wow!! talk about kicking yourself... i also heard he had ganster ties, anyone heard that one?

Yes, it's mentioned in several "trivia" entries in his IMDb bio! :)

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I find it funny that everyone seems to be really quick to discuss George Raft's stiffness onscreen, that's something I've always thought as well. It's also quite lucky for all of us that he turned down the iconic roles he did, particularly the ones that went to Bogie. In all fairness I think he was quite good opposite Bogart in They Drive by Night (1940).

After re watching a bunch of these great noir pictures among them some of my all time favorites (Nightmare Alley, Ministry of Fear), the one that I found myself enjoying the most in a repeat viewing was Murder My Sweet. I'm a die hard Chandler fan and seeing a Philip Marlowe case done this well onscreen always succeeds in making me geek out. Plus the main cast of Powell, Trevor, and Mazurki are absolutely perfect.

 

Im also a blogger at filmnoirarchive.com. The site offers reviews, lists, and public domain films noir free for showing!

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GUN CRAZY

 

'She ain't the type that makes a happy home'

 

A couple of observations.

 

It has been mentioned before but the one take bank robbery scene is absolutely fantastic. It's a single take for close to three and a half minutes.

A couple of details; Bart putting the cigarette in Laurie's mouth for a puff. To calm her nerves? Is it just a cigarette? Bart mentioning their performance outfits as the perfect disguise, because 'people will just notice the outfits'. The perfect timing of Bart entering the bank and the cop coming round the corner. Then when Laurie leaves the car to talk to the cop the camera moves forwards and sideways to follow the conversation through the car door window. Then the camera moves back when they make their getaway. Then Bart tells Laurie to look behind her, she turns and the camera moves in again to get a close up of her face (makes you realize the cameraman is on the back seat, actrice Peggy Cummings (Laurie) has to stay focused and look sideways of the cameraman - Is director Lewis in the backseat as well?). Then closing the scene with the almost diabolical look on Laurie's face and her snuggling up to Bart. 

 

If I'm not mistaken there are two more scenes of them in a car with the camera shooting them from the back seat. These are the live action scenes, contrasting the scenes where they are shot from the front in the care. These were obviously shot against rear screen projection. Except for one: The scene where Bart and Laurie have decided to spilt up. After the meat packing robbery we see Laurie getting into the second car. Notice how the camera is attached to the left front of the car. In itself already pretty amazing but even more so when they realize they do not want to be apart and they both turn the car to drive back to each other. Cummings has to turn the car with the camera mounted, and then it becomes clear that it's not just the camera on the car, but also a camera man, because the camera turns to capture Bart running towards the car and getting in the car, and then driving away again, all the while with the camera rolling. 

 

The extreme close up is used a lot in this film, displaying in full detail the emotions both characters are going through, but also to create a sense of confinement. And it's not just the faces. In the set up of the film there's a shot of Bart's clenched fist as his friend tries to shoot a mountain lion. The clenched fist in extreme close-up perfectly manages to display the turmoil Bart is going through. 

 

The ciimax of the film is as Noir as it gets; in a swamp like forrest with fog rising from the water, with the reed creating abstract images and a sense of dread filling the screen. Bart and Laurie are almost in a primal animal state now, disheveled and merely trying to survive. And then to get us even closer to the characters we just hear sounds like they do. The dogs. Introduced by a faint bark, coming closer followed by another extreme close up on Bart and Laurie's faces, showing their terror and fear. All leading to an inevitable and tragic conclusion. 

 

"I just like guns."

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NIGHTMARE ALLEY

 

Utterly fascinating film! For years it was the "holy grail" of noir enthusiasts, unavailable for viewing outside of film festivals because it was tied up in a legal dispute with the estate of the source novel's author William Lindsay Gresham. One TV airing on AMC slipped through and gave birth to hundreds of poor-quality bootleg VHS's complete with Bob Dorian intro. Then, 10 or so years ago, it was released suddenly and with no fanfare on a Fox DVD. Glad it could be included in the TCM festival this summer!

 

This is another one where a novel / film comparison is rewarding. Gresham, in several novels and a Houdini biography, delved deep into the world of carnivals and sideshows as well as the "spook rackets" that were flourishing at the time. In the 1920s/30s, as in earlier eras, spiritualism seemed to be pervasive in American society and permeated everything from medicine and psychiatry to Christian revivalism and self-help philosophies. It's a fascinating aspect of Amercian history.

 

The novel NGIHTMARE ALLEY is full of revealing details about the mechanics of the various trickeries Carlisle employed in the course of his career. It also goes into Carlisle's childhood where what he became originated -- in the family.

 

Manipulation and exploitation of belief is one of the most fertile grounds for film noir material.

The novel would also never pass the Hayes Code. lol

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I find it funny that everyone seems to be really quick to discuss George Raft's stiffness onscreen, that's something I've always thought as well. It's also quite lucky for all of us that he turned down the iconic roles he did, particularly the ones that went to Bogie. In all fairness I think he was quite good opposite Bogart in They Drive by Night (1940).

After re watching a bunch of these great noir pictures among them some of my all time favorites (Nightmare Alley, Ministry of Fear), the one that I found myself enjoying the most in a repeat viewing was Murder My Sweet. I'm a die hard Chandler fan and seeing a Philip Marlowe case done this well onscreen always succeeds in making me geek out. Plus the main cast of Powell, Trevor, and Mazurki are absolutely perfect.

 

Im also a blogger at filmnoirarchive.com. The site offers reviews, lists, and public domain films noir free for showing!

Again I'll point folks to Farewell My Lovely (1975) with Noir Icons Robert Mitchum, John Ireland, and hard boiled novelist Jim Thompson playing Judge Grayle. Its post Code and pre PC and is perhaps the closest film to the novel It probably has the definitive Moose Malloy, too,  though I love the "Pepper's Ghost" intro of Mike Mazurki.

 

As for George Raft I agree with They Drive by Night (1940), and add Red Light (1949) with Raymond Burr & Harry Morgan it's got some great noir stylistics .

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Nightmare Alley

 

Wasn’t Nightmare Alley produced by George Jessel? I couldn’t find anything online about Jessel working for King Brothers Productions.

 

The sets, the lighting, the clothes: everything about this movie was dim and dingy. In fact, the only distraction was Tyrone Power. At first, I couldn’t stop thinking, “That’s Tyrone Power,” but he’s so believably slimy: using people for his own financial gain, duping them with his con game. But the most amazing thing about this movie for me was Tyrone Power’s physical transformation. His character, Stan, is out-conned by the psychologist, Lilith Ritter, and his downfall seems quick and complete. He looks like he’s hit bottom by the end of the movie. Molly and the movie viewer are the only ones who still recognize him.

 

The movie starts off with tarot cards and fortune telling: a lot of talk about superstition. When Stan and Molly have their first argument, it’s about religion: Molly accuses him of acting like a minister and challenging God. But then it seems to be about fate. When the carnival boss asks Stan if he wants to play the geek, Stan tells him that he was born to it. Are superstition, religion, and fate supposed to be one and the same?

 

I thought that Stan giving the wrong bottle to Pete was an accident, but it seems to have had a deep effect on Stan. After his con is discovered, and he’s in the scene where he drinks with the hobos waiting for the train, he repeats the same story that Pete told to him before he died. I found it chilling.

 

Nightmare Alley is a perfect title for this story, and it’s going to stick with me for some time.

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Just a quick observation... Now that I've watched Ministry of Fear, I've noticed another similarity between this film and M. They both have scenes of children playing and more specifically, playing with balls. It was interesting to see that in Ministry of Fear because it's not necessary to the storyline, but it reminded me of M, especially since Elsie bouncing that ball at the beginning of M was such an important scene.

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NIGHTMARE ALLEY

 

Utterly fascinating film! For years it was the "holy grail" of noir enthusiasts, unavailable for viewing outside of film festivals because it was tied up in a legal dispute with the estate of the source novel's author William Lindsay Gresham. One TV airing on AMC slipped through and gave birth to hundreds of poor-quality bootleg VHS's complete with Bob Dorian intro. Then, 10 or so years ago, it was released suddenly and with no fanfare on a Fox DVD. Glad it could be included in the TCM festival this summer!

 

This is another one where a novel / film comparison is rewarding. Gresham, in several novels and a Houdini biography, delved deep into the world of carnivals and sideshows as well as the "spook rackets" that were flourishing at the time. In the 1920s/30s, as in earlier eras, spiritualism seemed to be pervasive in American society and permeated everything from medicine and psychiatry to Christian revivalism and self-help philosophies. It's a fascinating aspect of Amercian history.

 

The novel NGIHTMARE ALLEY is full of revealing details about the mechanics of the various trickeries Carlisle employed in the course of his career. It also goes into Carlisle's childhood where what he became originated -- in the family.

 

Manipulation and exploitation of belief is one of the most fertile grounds for film noir material.

I noticed that superstition and religion were themes in Nightmare Alley. Thank you for posting this background. One more thing: I think the "spook rackets" increased in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s for many reasons, but two of them were the desire for people to connect with their loved ones who died in World War I and the desperation many felt because of the Great Depression.

 

Does anyone watch the Miss Fisher Murder Mysteries on PBS? One episode, "Death Comes Knocking," is about murder, the "spiritualist fad," and trying to contact World War I dead.

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Detour

 

The first time I started watching Detour, I had to cut it short (I had to take a detour; sorry, I couldn’t resist) because I couldn’t stand listening to Vera give Al a hard time in Haskell’s car. I felt like my ears were starting to bleed. She barely paused long enough to take a breath. All her lines were given rapid-fire. I have to admire her skill at delivering them, but I kept thinking that Al’s biggest mistake was not turning himself in just to get away from her.

 

The second time I watched Detour, I made it all the way through and saw that Vera only got more shrill (though I didn’t think that it was possible) in the apartment that she rented with Al. I have to admit that I almost found it funny that Al accidently kills Vera by cutting off her air supply. I didn’t really like either one of them. I wasn’t exactly rooting for Al. His character isn’t the most sympathetic, but he was less unlikeable than Vera and I still wanted to see what the heck happened to him.

 

I don’t think that Al was telling his story to anyone else in the Nevada Diner. I think he was imagining what it would be like to tell police detectives or even jury members what had happened to him because he was using the second-person plural: “I know what you’re gonna hand me even before you open your mouths . . .,” “. . . your smug faces . . . .”

 

I heard that Ulmer added the very last scene, when the highway patrol stopped to pick up Al, only to satisfy the Hollywood Production Code, which maintained that murderers could not get away with their crimes. Too bad. The ending would have been even more effective if Al just wandered off on the desert road.

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Just curious, how does Night Moves fit in to the film noir/neo noir genres?

 Films Soleil, films of the sun, those sun baked, filled with light Noir (Classic examples):

 
 
Ace In The Hole 
The Hitch-Hicker 
High Sierra 
Gun Crazy 
Bad Day At Black Rock  (color)
Highway Dragnet 
Roadblock 
Inferno (color)
Desert Fury (color)
Niagara (color)
The Naked City 
Violent Saturday (color)
Nightfall 
The Lineup 
Suddenly 
Down Three Dark Streets 
The Breaking Point 
Cry Vengeance 
The Phenix City Story 
Jeopardy
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Films Soleil, films of the sun, those sun baked, filled with light Noir (Classic examples):

 

 

Ace In The Hole 

The Hitch-Hicker 

High Sierra 

Gun Crazy 

Bad Day At Black Rock  (color)

Highway Dragnet 

Roadblock 

Inferno (color)

Desert Fury (color)

Niagara (color)

The Naked City 

Violent Saturday (color)

Nightfall 

The Lineup 

Suddenly 

Down Three Dark Streets 

The Breaking Point 

Cry Vengeance 

The Phenix City Story 

Jeopardy

Ok. Thanks.

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Ok. Thanks.

 

Well there is a lot more than just the fact Night Moves has many outdoors scene in the sun.   Time is taken to show the personal live of the detective and how that is falling apart.   The detective is similar to the young girl he is being paid to find;   both suffer the same adolescent dilemma of being smart but not smart enough.   Another noir theme is that he is compulsive and obsessed with solving the crime.  Note he continues on the case without a client.     (Film Noir - Silver \ Ward).

 

Noir isn't just about the visuals. 

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Okay, I just wrote three paragraphs about "Scarlet Street" and lost the whole post.

 

I guess it's not my day.

 

I rewatched it yesterday, after years in between.  It was hard to watch Johnny Rocco or Enrico Bandero wearing an apron, washing dishes and being a general hausfrau.  I loved him in "Larceny, Inc." and "A Slight Case of Murder", where he's bad but not bad. 

 

That he got sucked into such a life for Kitty, and I'm not all that sure what Kitty's contribution was.  She had the apartment, furs, jewelry, etc. and still had Johnny on the side.  She even received notoriety for painting his paintings.

 

I felt sorry for Chris right from the beginning. 

 

I did enjoy Dan Duryea's part, he's usually just killing and beating.  This time his character was a little more developed and he had a sense of humor, not just a sadistic side.  I think he really loved Kitty but money came first. 

 

Joan Bennett was too hard to believe, "Lazy Legs', really?  She portrayed and lazy, dumb, golddigger really well.  She wasn't nice and didn't care how she took advantage of Chris.

 

A great film noir, especially near the end I really saw the visuals of darkness and shadows...when he tries to hang himself in his room. 

 

Very good movie.

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Okay, I just wrote three paragraphs about "Scarlet Street" and lost the whole post.

 

I guess it's not my day.

 

I rewatched it yesterday, after years in between.  It was hard to watch Johnny Rocco or Enrico Bandero wearing an apron, washing dishes and being a general hausfrau.  I loved him in "Larceny, Inc." and "A Slight Case of Murder", where he's bad but not bad. 

 

That he got sucked into such a life for Kitty, and I'm not all that sure what Kitty's contribution was.  She had the apartment, furs, jewelry, etc. and still had Johnny on the side.  She even received notoriety for painting his paintings.

 

I felt sorry for Chris right from the beginning. 

 

I did enjoy Dan Duryea's part, he's usually just killing and beating.  This time his character was a little more developed and he had a sense of humor, not just a sadistic side.  I think he really loved Kitty but money came first. 

 

Joan Bennett was too hard to believe, "Lazy Legs', really?  She portrayed and lazy, dumb, golddigger really well.  She wasn't nice and didn't care how she took advantage of Chris.

 

A great film noir, especially near the end I really saw the visuals of darkness and shadows...when he tries to hang himself in his room. 

 

Very good movie.

 

With regards to "I'm not all that sure what Kitty's contribution was":   For his sake,  I hope Chris Cross got beyond just painting her toes.

 

E.G. Robinson was one of the most versatile actors of the era.    What I find interesting is comparing his gangster films with his noir films.   In his gangster films he is hardboiled (even in the lighthearted comic ones like Brother Orchid).    In many of his noir films he plays a very different type of person (well except Key Largo,  but that was a throw-back to his 30s period). 

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"Gun Crazy" what a crazy movie.  I've never seen it, never even heard of it.

 

I thought at one point that Peggy was stringing him along...when she was going along with him and agreeing that they would pull one more job.  I thought she wasn't sincere about this and was just yessing him so he'd stop saying it was wrong.

 

It was a crazy movie.  It's funny how things have changed since those days, no quick way to stop them (cell phones, computers, etc.), he wasn't wearing gloves when he cut the meat even though the other man was.  Also, I noticed right away when she walked into the office in slacks and I said to myself, wait a minute, women didn't wear slacks to the office in those days.  To me it just screamed, this is out of place.  I laughed when the office manager chastised her for not wearing a skirt.  Funny how times have changed.

 

Today you think that anyone committing a crime must be crazy because the odds of getting caught are so much greater and getting caught so much quicker.  No one mentioned fingerprints.  It made law enforcement seem to me like they were not too bright.

 

I felt just as desperate as they were while they were running.  Putting the camera in the car while they were fleeing was a great idea. 

 

Also, he pulled her along like a rag doll in the swamp at the end.  She must really be a tiny little thing.  She was flopping all over the place.

 

Very good film noir movie...much better than "Bonnie and Clyde".

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"Gun Crazy" what a crazy movie.  I've never seen it, never even heard of it.

 

I thought at one point that Peggy was stringing him along...when she was going along with him and agreeing that they would pull one more job.  I thought she wasn't sincere about this and was just yessing him so he'd stop saying it was wrong.

 

It was a crazy movie.  It's funny how things have changed since those days, no quick way to stop them (cell phones, computers, etc.), he wasn't wearing gloves when he cut the meat even though the other man was.  Also, I noticed right away when she walked into the office in slacks and I said to myself, wait a minute, women didn't wear slacks to the office in those days.  To me it just screamed, this is out of place.  I laughed when the office manager chastised her for not wearing a skirt.  Funny how times have changed.

 

Today you think that anyone committing a crime must be crazy because the odds of getting caught are so much greater and getting caught so much quicker.  No one mentioned fingerprints.  It made law enforcement seem to me like they were not too bright.

 

I felt just as desperate as they were while they were running.  Putting the camera in the car while they were fleeing was a great idea. 

 

Also, he pulled her along like a rag doll in the swamp at the end.  She must really be a tiny little thing.  She was flopping all over the place.

 

Very good film noir movie...much better than "Bonnie and Clyde".

 

Yes, by now we know Gun Crazy is one crazy movie.     :blink:

 

(PS:  one can edit redundant post,  but I believe only the moderator can delete them).

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Sorry about the triplicate.  I'm having user issues with my computer!

 

No problem.  Happens to all of us.   I was just cracking wise like Philip Marlow. 

 

As for Gun Crazy;  This is a noir movie that many of us discover 'late',  as in we know about the Maltese Falcon, Laura, Out of the Past,  etc....   

 

But this so called minor film is worth seeing.    The best work by the two leads (but Dall was great in The Corn is Green with Bette Davis).    

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With regards to "I'm not all that sure what Kitty's contribution was":   For his sake,  I hope Chris Cross got beyond just painting her toes.

 

E.G. Robinson was one of the most versatile actors of the era.    What I find interesting is comparing his gangster films with his noir films.   In his gangster films he is hardboiled (even in the lighthearted comic ones like Brother Orchid).    In many of his noir films he plays a very different type of person (well except Key Largo,  but that was a throw-back to his 30s period). 

I'm assuming he did get beyond that, however, it being 1945, they weren't going to tell us.  She was also constantly mentioning how she hated anyone but Johnny touching her.  I'm assuming Chris touched her as well as the art critic drooling over her in their introductory scene together.  She also intimated with her eyes and body language when she first met Chris how she made her living.

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Well there is a lot more than just the fact Night Moves has many outdoors scene in the sun.   Time is taken to show the personal live of the detective and how that is falling apart.   The detective is similar to the young girl he is being paid to find;   both suffer the same adolescent dilemma of being smart but not smart enough.   Another noir theme is that he is compulsive and obsessed with solving the crime.  Note he continues on the case without a client.     (Film Noir - Silver \ Ward).

 

Noir isn't just about the visuals.

 

Yes the character flaws are valid and storyline. That's an astute point regarding his continuing the case without a client. But I would argue that the visuals are an equally important part of noir. I didn't see towering figures, special camera angles that make noir so interesting to me. I forget whether it was our instructor or Eddie Muller who said great noir should illicit empathy with the protagonist on the part of the viewer, I didn't care about Gene's character and certainly not any other of Night Move"s characters.

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No problem.  Happens to all of us.   I was just cracking wise like Philip Marlow. 

 

As for Gun Crazy;  This is a noir movie that many of us discover 'late',  as in we know about the Maltese Falcon, Laura, Out of the Past,  etc....   

 

But this so called minor film is worth seeing.    The best work by the two leads (but Dall was great in The Corn is Green with Bette Davis).    

I have never seen that one either. 

 

I have discovered movies, thanks to this course, that I've either never seen or never even heard of.  Just when I think I'm an old movie authority, another one pops up for me to discover.

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