Dr. Rich Edwards

June 12 TCM Film Noir Discussions for #NoirSummer for all 14 Films

216 posts in this topic

Marianne;  Did you notice at the end when the PI is in the art gallery,  that the nude statue's breast where censored out?    Yea,  MOVIE-TV shows a movie made in the 40s with artwork and blots out breast.    I have been to Italy many times and I have yet to see art covered up like that! 

 

It is insane,  but since MOVIES-TV is broadcast over the air,  unlike a cable station,  they make sure stuff that was A-OK for audiences 60 years ago,  isn't shown today.      Hey,  the first time I saw this it was really late at night and I felt I must be seeing things (well NOT seeing things),  but others have confirmed this.  

What is funny is that they don't do it during an action sequence, when the characters walk through the hall you see breasts, lol.

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Nightmare Alley and Gun Crazy

 

(spoilers, of course!)

 

I'm not sure why, but Nightmare Alley didn't do it for me. Maybe because I didn't like anyone. Or maybe because carnivals are creepy as hell.

 

I did soften up a little bit when I realized that he really did love Molly, but I originally thought he was ruthlessly using everyone. I get why Tyrone Power fans didn't turn up in droves for this one. 

 

Though I have to hand it to the psychologist. Nice work!

 

I did admire the makeup job at the end. He was barely recognizable once he'd fallen so far as to take a job as a geek.

 

But Gun Crazy I loved! The opening scene in the rain just screams noir. And of course I knew going in that there was no way it could end well, but I kept rooting for those two crazy kids. I even liked her, although she was clearly a sick, sick woman. The actors were able to convey the incredible desire and passion they had for each other while keeping all their clothes on. I was happy when he turned the car around.

 

The direction/cinematography kept surprising me with wonderful angles and framing. Riding in the back seat was a brilliant way to take us along for the ride.

 

And that final scene in the mist was their only possible happy ending. He still had a shred of his own values left. The only person he killed was the woman he loved, to make sure she didn't shoot his friends. If they'd made it to Mexico, she would have ended up hating him, and he would have ended up hating himself.

 

Live fast, die young, leave pretty corpses.

 

I haven't seen Bonnie and Clyde, but I wonder if it measures up. I thought this movie was pretty much perfect, so I don't see how it could.

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"Nightmare Alley", holy cow, what a deviation for Tyrone Power.  Gosh, he was handsome.  So many profile shots of him...no wonder everyone swooned!

 

Another noir I've never seen. 

 

He was soft and tender (of course only when it suited him) and hard and calculating and manipulating.  He did a great job.

 

I was amazed at how old Joan Blondell looked.  I love Joan Blondell from the early movies with James Cagney.  She looked like she had aged 20 years...perhaps make-up, perhaps life.  She had that heavy, bloated look that I saw when she was in "Here Come the Brides" near the end of her life. 

 

The cunning of Helen Walker...she scared me, wondering how many psychiatrists, etc. really do this.

 

I couldn't get past Coleen Gray's teeth, sounds terrible, but, I'm wondering if she got the part because of her dental anatomy.  The close-ups, there were so many.

 

The shadows, the darkness, the hopelessness, the misery, the caught-in-a-web feeling that these noir films give you...they were all done so well. 

 

This film did give hope at the end that Tyrone and Coleen will be okay, whatever okay means in that world.  Perhaps he was hanging onto her at the end because a glimmer of himself realized if he used her to climb back up on, he could have yet another chance.  Who knows how minds work when you're at the end of your rope?

 

The full-circle, geek story, wow...I knew when the carney manager said he had a job for him, I knew it was as the geek.

 

Great movie.

 

I'm with you on the teeth. That's all I could see when she talked.

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Glass Key: It's one of those films that keeps you guessing, which is fantastic. 9 out of 10 when it comes to mystery plots the answer is staring you in the face but with glass key it really isn't clear until the big revelation at the end. I kinda felt for Paul too, his own sister doesn't stand by him and the girl he loves is actively plotting against him, but he doesn't come off as a "bad guy" not really so it seems horrible to see the world sort of try and swallow him up. 

 

Laura: The thing that hit me in this was vincent price sans mustache. LOL. I did like this one except the character of Lydecker who just gave me the creepy crawlies. He was telling his story of Laura and I think the character is assuming that his story makes it obvious that he cared about her and loved her when the vibe I got was that he was a possessive stalker creepo. I'm so used to Vincent Price from the horror movie genre where he is ALWAYS the one who did it that it took me a moment to realize that he didn't...but it became pretty obvious very quickly...then Lydecker's steering of the investigation towards shelby came off as very suspicious. I think perhaps I didn't like Lydecker because I dated that type before, the possessive manipulative jack **** type and he rubbed me the wrong way the whole time which I don't think he was meant to be unlikable the entire time. If that makes sense..

 

Ministry of Fear: I kinda loved how everything in this film seemed to be connected. Some character would appear and they looked super familiar and it's like "OH YEA WE SAW THEM EARLIER" sort of thing. And nearly every one of them is a bad guy. He some how stumbles into what almost feels like an alternate world where practically everyone he meets is actively conspiring against him. One of the other things that I think I noticed though I could be completely wrong was travers, the spy who is undercover as a tailor, I think he was played by the guy who played Johnny in Scarlet Street. I'd have to look the name up to be sure but the face kinda jogged something in my head. 

 

Danger Signal: This is one of those films where the person you are supposed to bet against makes himself known from the get go. And he's pretty bad. The film opens with the woman he's staying with apparently killing herself and he goes on the run. The minute though that he asks his new fiancee to write a suicide note for him something clicks in your brain and you realize he killed the first lady and is probably going to kill this one too. From that point on it's almost a race against time to see if she can get him before he gets her..and even though neither of those things actually happens it feels like they are going to, like it's somewhat inevitable so kudos to the scriptwriter on this because the actual ending is like "oh...well that works too" lol and then happy futures all around. 

 

Mildred Pierce: Holy cats Veda is just horrid. The entire time you want to see something worthwhile in her, if only to make her mother's devotion to her feel in any way appreciated but there's nothing. She hasn't got a single redeeming quality.

 

Deadline at Dawn: This one I liked for the interaction between the two love interests. She doesn't know if she can trust him but you could tell she wanted to. 

 

Johnny Angel: This one does a great job in terms of misdirection, where the real person 'who done it' isn't even really hinted at. I also kinda loved the portrayal of new orleans, it made a nice break from the typical noir settings. 

 

Murder, My Sweet: This one is a personal favorite of mine, I've even read the book...and as far as the book is concerned the moose in the film is a lot more likable. The one in the book kills just about everyone he meets, not out of malice but more like how amthor bites it...because he's too strong and too dumb to know he's doing it. Also in the book version Marriot is a bigger character, much more important than he is here. Here he is just the thing that gets Marlowe swept into the plot. The spiderwebs were facinating to me...as many times as I've seen this I never noticed before that they move with the camera...seems obvious now but I think they were on the lens, like a gel or something of that nature is on a light...I found noticing that I had a whole new appreciation for the film in terms of cinematography. I looked closer at the way the camera existed in the environment and it really just made me like the film more lol

 

Detour: This one kinda hit me funny. When it started I was absolutely not into it..but by the time he climbs into that car with Haskell I couldn't look away lol. The main character gets the short end of the stick here though for sure. He makes what he thinks are the right choices when he makes them for the most part but he still ends up between a rock and a hard place. And when he comes to the conclusion that he can't be himself or haskell and has to go on living as a hitch hiking vagrant it's just sort of really tragic. I actually talked to my grandma about this a bit after I watched it in terms of hitchhiking. It's not really a part of our society anymore. It's dangerous to pick up one and dangerous to try and do it so neither of those things seems to happen, so I didn't really understand what it was like before it was considered dangerous. Grandma explained that back in the day there were fewer cars...sometimes only a few in a particular neighborhood so it wasn't  uncommon to see people hitchhiking around the time this film was set. She said they didn't really think anything about picking someone up either, it was very casual and accepted at the time. So the film comes from a time where it was considered no big deal to hitch hike which gave me a different appreciation for it. It would be a bit like someone doing a seemingly harmless thing like getting coffee at starbucks when all hell breaks loose and it gives the film a different flavor if you think about it not as him doing something dangerous to that gets him in trouble because, according to grandma, they didn't think hitch hiking was dangerous where she came from. 

 

Gun Crazy: The thing that jumped out to me about a part of this was sort of a gender switch on frank butler and annie oakley as far as the "meet cute" part of the film goes. There was a quote that jumped out to me here, so much so that I joted it down in my notebook "You're the only thing that's real, the rest is a nightmare" Also the swamp sequence reminded me of high sierra, in that it's the end of the road and there is no way that this is going to turn out well for them. High Sierra was the same way. When he started up that mountain that was that. There was absolutely no way he was going to survive to the end of the story no matter what he did from that point forward...this is much the same. The minute they got out of that car they were doomed. You feel it the same way you felt it in High Sierra. 

 

Tomorrow is another day: I loved the ending on this one. The fact that they had been on the run and no one was chasing them was one thing but both of them getting to leave with their heads held high and get their happy ending was actually really great. Throughout the film you sort of fall for them both, even though, in the beginning it was her lying to him that nearly drove him a bit around the bend. What sort of a woman convinces someone that they are a killer...she seems a bit like that shrink lady from nightmare alley retrospectively (as I watched that one after this one so I wouldn't have seen it at the time) in the beginning but she changes. It seems really trite to say that "love" changed her but maybe it did. But it had a flavor like woman on the run in that you want the husband and wife to be together and okay and for most of the film that doesn't seem like it will happen. And after that kid found the magazine it was like "oh nooooooooooo!" in the same vein as when the husband in woman on the run goes to meet the killer. It was the same feeling of dread...something that noir films excel at. 

 

Nightmare Alley: I just touched on this one briefly in relation to the other film but what struck me here was not the carnival or the spiritualism hoax but the psychiatrist. She's into this mess up to her eyeballs and she still manages to slither her way out. In that one sequence after he goes back for the rest of his money you suddenly see her as she truly is, manipulative snake type personality willing to drive him insane in order to keep her secrets. She quickly takes his place in my mind as the "villain" of the piece. The other thing that jumped out to me was Bruno...I think he is played by the actor who did Moose in Murder, My Sweet. I really get excited when I see familiar faces in old movies. It's like OH HEY IT'S THAT GUY XD

 

Night Moves: For me the thing about this film was the familiar faces..they kinda overpowered the plot because I was like "OH LOOK HOW YOUNG HE/SHE IS" I think I just wasn't expecting to recognize anyone other than gene hackman when the film started so that's where it came from. I will say though that it had some of the interconnectivity that I noticed in ministry of fear in that just about everyone he meets is part of this huge conspiracy. There was also a very memorable quote "Take a swing at me Harry, the way Sam Spade would" that made my little TCM radar go YAY. The body count here is insane too...in the same vein as the book version of Murder, My Sweet (it's not called that though...Farewell, My lovely I think is the title) They just seem to keep piling up, even at the end it isn't clear if the detective is going to make it either. And it's sort of out of context to say it but there is a line from midsummer night's dream...the way they mean it in the play is different but the wording fits "For when the players are all dead, there needs none to be blamed" it is the best way to describe that final sequence in Night Moves. 

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Laura (1944)

 

Roger Ebert observed, "Film noir is known for its convoluted plots and arbitrary twists, but even in a genre that gave us The Maltese Falcon, this takes some kind of prize...That Laura continues to weave a spell -- and it does -- is a tribute to style over sanity." Do you agree? What about Clifton Webb's style?

 

I enjoyed Richard Edwards observation that since Laura is a traditional Hollywood film shot by German émigré Otto Preminger, who fled the horrors of Europe, "noir then becomes the counterpoint that starts to prick at the conscience of the audience."

 

I often think of noir as bumping up against the Hays Code. When you consider the implications of the underlying murder at the heart of Laura, how well does it adhere to the principle that "No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin?"

 

More on Laura

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Night Moves (1975)

 

I very much appreciated what Roger Ebert had to say in tying Harry Moseby to Philip Marlowe by way of Raymond Chandler.

 

"What [Gene Hackman] brings to Night Moves is crucial; he must be absolutely sure of his identity as a free-lance gumshoe, even while all of his craft is useless and all of his hunches are based on ignorance of the big picture. Maybe the movie is saying that the old film noir faith is dead, that although in Chandler's words 'down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid,' when this man goes down those streets he is blind-sided by a plot that has no respect for him."–Roger Ebert

 

More on Night Moves

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Many years ago I watched Gun Crazy for the first time on the late, late show. I'd never heard of it and didn't know anything about it. It's now one of my favorite films. Its CRAZY in all caps. The psycho-sexual drama is right on the surface, not hidden and vaguely alluded to. The "cute meet" in this film consists of Cummins pointing a gun in John Dall's face and pulling the trigger. But the best scene in the one where Cummins is sitting on the bed in the background slipping on her nylons while in the foreground Dall is cleaning his gun. Subtle? Not!

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THE GLASS KEY: People with glass jaws shouldn't throw punches.

Based on a novel of manners by Hammett where one's self-interest is masked by loyalty.

 

LAURA: All's fair in love and Laura.

A detective interupts a suspect writing his confession in the bath, falls for the murder victim who he 

almost lets get murdered again right after solving her first alleged murder. 

 

MINISTRY OF FEAR: A fish out of fryer.

Neal like Fritz Lang leaves an insane asylum to find the outside world to be even more crazy.

 

MURDER, MY SWEET: The unsinging detective.

As the plot gets murky, Marlow has a coked-up dream reflecting our state of mind as we're both tangled in a web of clues.

 

DANGER SIGNAL: Karma police.

What goes around comes around but someone needs to give it a push or scare it off a cliff.. 

 

DETOUR: Murphy's Law.

Life is what happens while your busy making other plans which can divert you from your true love forever.

 

MILDRED PIERCE: Spare the rod.

Single mother finds great success spoiling her child.

 

DEADLINE AT DAWN: Turtle Bay.

Well-paced crime drama as if written by William Saroyan if he lived in NYC.

 

JOHNNY ANGEL: Sea Movie

Hoagie Carmichael is the only beacon in this foggy foam noir.

 

THE GANGSTER: Tragedy of Errors.

Shabunka and other diner lives' stories are woven together until they're unravelled by greed.

 

GUN CRAZY: Happiness is a Warm Gun.

Bart and Laurie are bound to each other by their love of guns and love of each other over society.

Laurie's resemblance to Bart's sister/guardian may not be accidental.

 

TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY: Back with the Wind.

Ex-con who is remorseless for killing his father is led to believe he killed his future wife's boyfriend

and they live happily ever after.

 

NIGHTMARE ALLEY: Be careful what you ask for.

A carny asks how does someone become a geek.

 

NIGHT MOVES: Success is mostly about just showing up.

Unlike Marlowe and Spade, Harry rarely seems like the smartest one in the room: "I didn't solve anything I just fell into it." But he succeeds due to his work ethic.

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Deadline at Dawn

 

I really enjoyed this movie. It was deceptively simple, once all the loose ends were tied together at the end. But before that, the plot and the dialogue were going in all directions.

 

Deadline at Dawn opens with a hallway and the stairs leading up to it. The credits start quickly while the camera stays on this shot. Then a blind man taps his way up the stairs toward the camera, turns, walks down the hall away from the camera, and knocks on the door farthest from the camera: A great introduction. The blind man could be a metaphor for the film’s viewers: We will be following the plot blindly, without knowing where it will lead.

 

After the sequence between the blind man and a woman named Edna, the camera dissolves from the blind man’s boutonniere to a sailor’s hat. It is a great transition, but what is missing in between? The viewer has no idea, and the film barely makes sense until all the plot details are woven together in the end. Here are a couple of additional examples where the plot didn’t seem to make any sense:

• Gus and June are followed while they are riding in Gus’s cab. Gus stops his cab and gets out to find out who it is. He turns out to be the guy from the dance hall, who just became an American citizen. He was the one loitering in the shadows outside Edna’s apartment. Was he just following June ever since he met her in the dance hall? (This sequence includes Gus’s speech about life, love, and logic.)

• How does Gus know June’s age? Or is he just guessing for poetic license? He says that June is 23, and he’s 53.

 

Gus’s speech to June about the meaning of life, love, and logic seems to explain existential angst in general, all of film noir, and the human condition, all at once: “The logic you are looking for, the logic is that there is no logic. The horror and terror you feel, my dear, comes from being alive. Die, and there is no trouble. Live, and you struggle. . . .” And Gus should know. By the end of Deadline at Dawn, viewers finally see the logic to the plot, but they can expect that kind of conclusion, that kind of logic, only in the movies!

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I just finished reading the novel Laura, by Vera Caspary, and all the wonderful lines delivered by Clifton Webb as Waldo Lydecker seem to be unique to the movie. Per Wikipedia:

 

Caspary eventually adapted the play for a novel with the same title and a sequel entitled simply Laura, both of which eventually were purchased by 20th Century Fox for $30,000. . . . Peminger began working with Jay Dratler, Samuel Hoffenstein and Betty Reinhardt. Recalling the differences of opinion he and Caspary had had, Preminger opted not to involve her until the first draft was completed. He sensed the more interesting character was not Laura but Waldo Lydecker and expanded his role accordingly, but Caspary was unhappy with the changes to her plot.”

 

So I guess I can assume that Caspary did not write the wonderful dialogue for the movie, too. Does anyone have any more information about the writing of the screenplay for Laura?

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I just finished reading the novel Laura, by Vera Caspary, and all the wonderful lines delivered by Clifton Webb as Waldo Lydecker seem to be unique to the movie. Per Wikipedia:

 

Caspary eventually adapted the play for a novel with the same title and a sequel entitled simply Laura, both of which eventually were purchased by 20th Century Fox for $30,000. . . . Peminger began working with Jay Dratler, Samuel Hoffenstein and Betty Reinhardt. Recalling the differences of opinion he and Caspary had had, Preminger opted not to involve her until the first draft was completed. He sensed the more interesting character was not Laura but Waldo Lydecker and expanded his role accordingly, but Caspary was unhappy with the changes to her plot.”

 

So I guess I can assume that Caspary did not write the wonderful dialogue for the movie, too. Does anyone have any more information about the writing of the screenplay for Laura?

 

Note sure what additional information you're looking for.   Caspary didn't write the screenplay but the 3 that did,  used paraphrased dialogue from the novel in the movie.

 

As for the character Laura:  there is a thread on this forum about scenes and dialogue related to Laura (the character) that was removed.   This 'missing' scene was between Mark and Laura, right before the ending where Laura tells Mark that the story Waldo told Mark (the detective) about meeting Laura (the initial flashback scene in the film with the pen etc...),  was mostly made up.    Instead Waldo found Laura in court on some minor charges and that is how he came to help her.    i.e. Laura wasn't the saint that Waldo portrayed to Mark.   I wish Preminger had included that scene since it make Laura more human and helps explains Waldo's mental state.  

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Note sure what additional information you're looking for.   Caspary didn't write the screenplay but the 3 that did,  used paraphrased dialogue from the novel in the movie.

 

As for the character Laura:  there is a thread on this forum about scenes and dialogue related to Laura (the character) that was removed.   This 'missing' scene was between Mark and Laura, right before the ending where Laura tells Mark that the story Waldo told Mark (the detective) about meeting Laura (the initial flashback scene in the film with the pen etc...),  was mostly made up.    Instead Waldo found Laura in court on some minor charges and that is how he came to help her.    i.e. Laura wasn't the saint that Waldo portrayed to Mark.   I wish Preminger had included that scene since it make Laura more human and helps explains Waldo's mental state.  

 

I wasn't sure why Preminger showed the draft of the screenplay for Laura to Caspary. I thought maybe Caspary did provide some uncredited input. I suspect Clifton Webb was allowed to do some ad-libbing. I didn't recognize any of his funny lines from the movie in the novel, but I read the novel over several weeks and so my recall of it might not be crisp.

 

I went back through the discussion thread on this forum twice now (before this post and before the first post today about Laura), and I didn't find anything about the deleted scene. I'm glad you mentioned it. It's not in the novel, not that I recall. It would definitely have added another layer to the story. If Mark McPherson was worth his salt as an NYPD detective, he would have done a background search on all his suspects and I bet he would have come up with any past brushes with the law for Laura.

 

By the way, why would her past brush with the law have shown Waldo's mental state? He seemed to be a crackpot of his own making. Sure, he liked to write about crime, but it seems logical, really, that he would have found Laura through the research he did for writing his newspaper column.

 

I usually prefer the book to the movie, but in this case, Laura the movie wins out. All that witty dialogue alone makes the movie more fun.

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I wasn't sure why Preminger showed the draft of the screenplay for Laura to Caspary. I thought maybe Caspary did provide some uncredited input. I suspect Clifton Webb was allowed to do some ad-libbing. I didn't recognize any of his funny lines from the movie in the novel, but I read the novel over several weeks and so my recall of it might not be crisp.

 

I went back through the discussion thread on this forum twice now (before this post and before the first post today about Laura), and I didn't find anything about the deleted scene. I'm glad you mentioned it. It's not in the novel, not that I recall. It would definitely have added another layer to the story. If Mark McPherson was worth his salt as an NYPD detective, he would have done a background search on all his suspects and I bet he would have come up with any past brushes with the law for Laura.

 

By the way, why would her past brush with the law have shown Waldo's mental state? He seemed to be a crackpot of his own making. Sure, he liked to write about crime, but it seems logical, really, that he would have found Laura through the research he did for writing his newspaper column.

 

I usually prefer the book to the movie, but in this case, Laura the movie wins out. All that witty dialogue alone makes the movie more fun.

 

Saying 'shown Waldo's mental state' was a poor choice of words on my part.   What I meant was that viewers would get better insight into why he felt so betrayed by Laura.    In his mind that story he told Mark was the truth.  Waldo had to make it the truth to justify his feelings.   i.e. he had erased the actual truth and replaced it with one where Laura was flawless.   Therefore when a flawless gal like Laura falls in love with those way beneath her (Shelby in the mixed up mind of Waldo) and rejects the perfect type of man for her (again only in the mind of Waldo),  that leads to him using a shotgun.

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Tomorrow is Another Day

 

Finally got around this movie... seems such a long time since the early days of the course: that's an awful lot of dames, dubious decisions, double-dealing, death and despair! 

 

This one didn't have much in the way of death, but the one it did have was crucial in that it caused our protagonists to exercise some of those wonderful dubious decision making skills we've so grown to love! They run because they thought they'd killed a cop - well, they did but for some highly improbable reason he makes a death-bed confession that it was in self-defense. Right. Like that would ever happen! 

 

Anyway, apart from the wishy-washy tacked-on happy ending (I agree with Eddie Muller that it would have been far more Noir to end with Cay killing Bill only to find they'd been exonerated afterwards!), I found it fascinating in many ways: the stowing away on the car carrier, the back-breaking work in the lettuce fields, the fashion (what I would have thought of as late 50s denim fashion in 1951, who knew?). I love what I'm learning about society in the late 40s and early 50s. 

 

A good movie. It wasn't fantastic, but it was a strong Noir B feature with good performances from the stars. 

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The Gangster

 

So stagey and hammy! A pretty dreadful B-movie, imho. Nothing really happens...slowly. And then the protagonist dies. 

 

Still, it really looked great and hit so many Noir buttons with it's visuals. I just wish I'd watched the thing with the sound off! It had a great (if largely wasted) cast too, which came as a surprise. But the male lead was about as exciting to watch and expressive as a cigar-store Indian, and the female lead (Belinda, Melita, Viagra, Ryvita?), although she had scene-stealing pins, was pretty uninspiring otherwise. 

 

Best thing about it? Shabunka's pre-death monologue as the rain lashed him was excellent, though even then they ruined it slightly by the hail of bullets that killed him seeming to having less effect on him than the wind until he fell face forward into the gutter! 

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The Gangster

 

So stagey and hammy! A pretty dreadful B-movie, imho. Nothing really happens...slowly. And then the protagonist dies. 

 

Still, it really looked great and hit so many Noir buttons with it's visuals. I just wish I'd watched the thing with the sound off! It had a great (if largely wasted) cast too, which came as a surprise. But the male lead was about as exciting to watch and expressive as a cigar-store Indian, and the female lead (Belinda, Melita, Viagra, Ryvita?), although she had scene-stealing pins, was pretty uninspiring otherwise. 

 

Best thing about it? Shabunka's pre-death monologue as the rain lashed him was excellent, though even then they ruined it slightly by the hail of bullets that killed him seeming to having less effect on him than the wind until he fell face forward into the gutter! 

The backstory that was gutted from the film was that Shbunka was running brothels and that Ice Cream Parlor Jammy owned the properties with the whorehouses. It's barely alluded to in the dialog where Jammy asks Shubunka for a hundred dollars for damages to one of the houses. 

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