Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

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The passing of Ron Glass makes me very unhappy. He was truly a treasure. He communicated a combination of boyishness and worldliness with perfection. This is demonstrated well in: Firefly (2002) in which he portrays monk/reverend/counselor Shepherd Book. He is mild-mannered and unpretentious and has a great store of gentle wisdom. It is in the episode: War Stories that the crew is preparing to go on a mission to rescue one of their own and the second-in-command finds him loading a weapon:

 

Second-in-Command: Don't the Bible have some pretty specific things to say about killing? 
Shepherd Book: Quite specific. It is, however, somewhat fuzzier on the subject of kneecaps. 

 

I can think of no other actor who could have so completely owned that line. The subtle trace of being an imp is unmistakable.

 

I am sad to say that I know little of his older work and I had hoped to see much more of him in the future.

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Ron Glass guest starred in my favorite All In The Family episode, "Everybody Tells The Truth"; Various Rashomon-like perspectives show him as a regular guy, an Uncle Tom, and an overbearing militant.

 

 

Guess which All in the Family episode FamilyNet just broadcast?

 

When I read the synopsis from the Guide I realized this was the one you were talking about and there was no way I wasn't going to see it.  Thank you for the heads up.  This was hilarious and Mr. Glass nailed all three personas.  Seeing perennial villain Ken Lynch in a comedy was a bonus.  Seeing Archie get his at the end-he got them thrown out of the restaurant-was the icing on the cake.   

 

My sympathy to Mr. Glass' family and friends.

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Valerie Gaunt - British actress Valerie Gaunt has died at the age of 84. Ms. Gaunt had a very short acting career, only appearing in 2 minor TV roles and 2 supporting film roles. But those film roles secured her a place in horror film history. First she appeared as Justine opposite Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee in Hammer Studio's 1957 hit The Curse of Frankenstein. She quickly followed that up with a the memorable role as the vampire woman in 1958's Horror of Dracula. She married her husband of 58 years that same year and retired from acting.

 

 

Valerie Gaunt in The Curse of Frankenstein

 

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and in Horror of Dracula

 

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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/30/arts/television/grant-tinker-former-chairman-of-nbc-dies-at-90.html?module=WatchingPortal&region=c-column-middle-span-region&pgType=Homepage&action=click&mediaId=thumb_square&state=standard&contentPlacement=6&version=internal&contentCollection=www.nytimes.com&contentId=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2016%2F11%2F30%2Farts%2Ftelevision%2Fgrant-tinker-former-chairman-of-nbc-dies-at-90.html&eventName=Watching-article-click&_r=0

 

Grant Tinker, who produced “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and other television hits in the 1970s and transformed NBC from a perennial ratings loser to a powerhouse of literate, sophisticated network programming that helped change America’s viewing habits in the ’80s, died on Monday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 90.

 

To a generation whose tastes were shaped by the tube, Mr. Tinker was the unseen hand behind many of the most stylish, critically acclaimed sitcoms and dramas on television. He did it by giving his writers space to thrive, shielding them from those foolish studio and network executives who said they liked the story, all right, but wanted to change the boy to a dog — and usually got their way.

 

As president of MTM Enterprises, a company he founded with his second wife, Mary Tyler Moore, in 1970, Mr. Tinker produced the show named for her, one of the first series to feature an independent career woman as the central character, as well as spinoffs like “Rhoda” and the one-hour newsroom drama “Lou Grant,” which examined societal issues.

 

And as chairman and chief executive of NBC from 1981 to 1986, Mr. Tinker crammed prime time with many of television’s most imaginative, successful and long-running series, including “The Cosby Show,” “Cheers,” “Hill Street Blues,” “Family Ties,” “St. Elsewhere” and “Miami Vice.” Besides runaway ratings and an avalanche of awards, NBC secured annual profits that soared to $500 million, from $48 million, during Mr. Tinker’s tenure.

 

 

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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/29/movies/al-brodax-who-steered-the-beatles-yellow-submarine-to-the-screen-dies-at-90.html?_r=0

 

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Al Brodax, a television producer who delivered an enduring psychedelic classic when he turned the Beatles song “Yellow Submarine” into an animated film in 1968, died on Thursday in Danbury, Conn. He was 90.

 

In the 1960s, Mr. Brodax (pronounced BROH-dax) ran the motion picture and television division of King Features Syndicate, where he produced hundreds of “Popeye” cartoons for television. Quick to see the cartoon potential of the Beatles, he sold their manager, Brian Epstein, on the idea of an animated series. “The Beatles” ran on Saturday mornings on ABC from 1965 to 1969 (in reruns for the last two years), attracting huge audiences.

 

When “Yellow Submarine” climbed the charts in 1966, Mr. Brodax sensed that lightning might strike twice. He approached Mr. Epstein again, this time with some trepidation; the Beatles did not like “The Beatles.” But there was an opening. The group owed United Artists one more film after “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Help!,” but had lost interest in acting. An animated film, Mr. Brodax argued, would require virtually no participation by the Beatles and satisfy the conditions of their contract. “All they had to do was sign a piece of paper,” he told the website 21st Century Radio in 1994. “I’d do the work.”

 

A deal was struck. Mr. Brodax put together a team of writers and animators who, despite constant friction and turmoil and a slender budget of $1 million, created a small miracle: a Popsicle-colored fantasia devoted to peace, love and the thrilling pulse of the Beatles’ music.​

 

Al Brodax made a brief appearance in “Yellow Submarine.”

 

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Andrew Sachs (1930-2016) best known as Manuel in Fawlty Towers has died at the age of 86.

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Don Calfa - Character actor who amassed over 80 film and television credits over a 47 year career, has died at the age of 76. His best known roles were as a hitman in 1989's Weekend at Bernie's and, a personal favorite, Ernie the undertaker in 1985's Return of the Living Dead.

 

 

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Don Calfa - Character actor who amassed over 80 film and television credits over a 47 year career, has died at the age of 76. His best known roles were as a hitman in 1989's Weekend at Bernie's and, a personal favorite, Ernie the undertaker in 1985's Return of the Living Dead.

 

Calfa was absolutely hilarious in Return of the Living Dead, along with James Karen.

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Calfa was absolutely hilarious in Return of the Living Dead, along with James Karen.

 

A bit out of my usual genre, but a quick Google image search of James Karen says that he must be a very funny guy.  Yes, now that I put a face to the name, I have seen him before in some B&Ws.

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A bit out of my usual genre, but a quick Google image search of James Karen says that he must be a very funny guy.  Yes, now that I put a face to the name, I have seen him before in some B&Ws.

He has played some solid serious parts, in Wall Street and The China Syndrome. But the first time I saw him was when he used to advertise on tv for Pathmark supermarkets. I think that chain is still around.

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Just remembered Don Calfa played Dudley Moore's neighbor in 10.  They each had telescopes and were constantly spying on each other.

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Billy Chapin, probably best known for playing the boy who protects his kid sister and her doll containing a substantial sum of money from evil Bob Mitchum in Night of the Hunter, has died aged 72.

 

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The passing of Ron Glass makes me very unhappy. He was truly a treasure. He communicated a combination of boyishness and worldliness with perfection. This is demonstrated well in: Firefly (2002) in which he portrays monk/reverend/counselor Shepherd Book. He is mild-mannered and unpretentious and has a great store of gentle wisdom. It is in the episode: War Stories that the crew is preparing to go on a mission to rescue one of their own and the second-in-command finds him loading a weapon:

 

Second-in-Command: Don't the Bible have some pretty specific things to say about killing?

Shepherd Book: Quite specific. It is, however, somewhat fuzzier on the subject of kneecaps.

 

I can think of no other actor who could have so completely owned that line. The subtle trace of being an imp is unmistakable.

 

I am sad to say that I know little of his older work and I had hoped to see much more of him in the future.

Sans-- I hope you get to see some reruns of Barney Miller on cable. That's how most of us first met him and remember Ron Glass. It's truly an exceptional ensemble show, but he really stood out. It was one of the Great sitcoms of the seventies.

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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/30/arts/television/grant-tinker-former-chairman-of-nbc-dies-at-90.html?module=WatchingPortal®ion=c-column-middle-span-region&pgType=Homepage&action=click&mediaId=thumb_square&state=standard&contentPlacement=6&version=internal&contentCollection=www.nytimes.com&contentId=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2016%2F11%2F30%2Farts%2Ftelevision%2Fgrant-tinker-former-chairman-of-nbc-dies-at-90.html&eventName=Watching-article-click&_r=0

 

 

 

 

Grant Tinker, who produced “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and other television hits in the 1970s and transformed NBC from a perennial ratings loser to a powerhouse of literate, sophisticated network programming that helped change America’s viewing habits in the ’80s, died on Monday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 90.

To a generation whose tastes were shaped by the tube, Mr. Tinker was the unseen hand behind many of the most stylish, critically acclaimed sitcoms and dramas on television. He did it by giving his writers space to thrive, shielding them from those foolish studio and network executives who said they liked the story, all right, but wanted to change the boy to a dog — and usually got their way.

As president of MTM Enterprises, a company he founded with his second wife, Mary Tyler Moore, in 1970, Mr. Tinker produced the show named for her, one of the first series to feature an independent career woman as the central character, as well as spinoffs like “Rhoda” and the one-hour newsroom drama “Lou Grant,” which examined societal issues.

And as chairman and chief executive of NBC from 1981 to 1986, Mr. Tinker crammed prime time with many of television’s most imaginative, successful and long-running series, including “The Cosby Show,” “Cheers,” “Hill Street Blues,” “Family Ties,” “St. Elsewhere” and “Miami Vice.” Besides runaway ratings and an avalanche of awards, NBC secured annual profits that soared to $500 million, from $48 million, during Mr. Tinker’s tenure.

uLJe84Y.jpg

 

Grant Tinker was never an actor, so he was never as well -known publicly as say Desi Arnaz, George Burns or Dick Powell. Like those three men, who created original entertainment serial television --not the reality tripe television as we know it today -- but, comedies and dramas that we're not just entertaining but also insightful. What also puts Grant in the category with these men is that he was married to a woman who had extraordinary talent, but who would have never become a television star without his behind-the-scenes executive work.

 

(The only other husband-executive I can think of who will go in as a footnote in this category is Tom Lewis, the ad man who put Loretta Young behind that swinging door. However, to my knowledge, Tom Lewis did not produce or create any other TV shows.)

 

Grant Tinker was not just The Man Behind MTM; he was MTM.

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Actually, Mary Tyler Moore was cast as Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show a year before marrying Grant Tinker.

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Actually, Mary Tyler Moore was cast as Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show a year before marrying Grant Tinker.

 

 

By the time the late sixties rolled around, Mary Tyler Moore was a has been in television. In 1967 she had been cast in Thoroughly Modern Millie but she didn't go anywhere after that.

 

Around that time, She had been slated to star in a musical version of Breakfast at Tiffany's on Broadway, but it was a complete disaster and closed before it ever opened up on Broadway. This greatly damaged her Show Business reputation, as well as her personal opinion of herself as a performer.

 

In 1969 the best job she was getting was starring opposite Elvis Presley as a nun in A Change of Habit.

 

When Grant Tinker set her up at MTM in the Mary Tyler Moore Show in 1970, she was a has-been Starlet from an old sixties TV show. Not too many people thought she could carry a sitcom or that the show would go anywhere. However he made her the biggest star on television and she actually was able to spawn three major hit TV series on her coattails-- Rhoda, Phyllis, and Lou Grant.

 

Mary may have become very popular in the early sixties in the Dick Van Dyke Show, but she was by no means a major television star like Lucille Ball, Danny Thomas, Jackie Gleason, Red Skelton or Jack Benny.

 

Mary may have been a little more popular than Marjorie Lord of the Danny Thomas Show or Cara Williams of Pete and Gladys or Jane Wyatt on Father Knows Best But she wasn't the biggest star in television by any means-- she was a co-star second banana, who the public liked as a very attractive and talented performer.

 

Thanks to the Mary Tyler Moore Show she became as big as anyone who has ever been on TV and at that point she was certainly as big as Lucille Ball or Carol Burnett, thanks to her husband Grant Tinker.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Williams

 

Van Williams (February 27, 1934 - November 26, 2016) was an actor best known for his television role as Britt Reid/the Green Hornet and his earlier leading role as Kenny Madison in both Warner Bros. television detective series Bourbon Street Beat (1959) and its sequel, Surfside 6 (1960). He teamed for one season with the late Bruce Lee as his partner Kato, in the television series The Green Hornet, broadcast on ABC during the 1966–67 season.

 

According to a report on Facebook, by producer Kevin Burns, Van Williams died on November 26, 2016, at the age of 82. He was reported to have worked as a firefighter in the greater Los Angeles area, in addition to his being a Reserve Deputy Sheriff, and to have suffered singed lungs and back injuries as a result.

 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Williams

 

Van Williams (February 27, 1934 - November 26, 2016) was an actor best known for his television role as Britt Reid/the Green Hornet and his earlier leading role as Kenny Madison in both Warner Bros. television detective series Bourbon Street Beat (1959) and its sequel, Surfside 6 (1960). He teamed for one season with the late Bruce Lee as his partner Kato, in the television series The Green Hornet, broadcast on ABC during the 1966–67 season.

 

According to a report on Facebook, by producer Kevin Burns, Van Williams died on November 26, 2016, at the age of 82. He was reported to have worked as a firefighter in the greater Los Angeles area, in addition to his being a Reserve Deputy Sheriff, and to have suffered singed lungs and back injuries as a result.

 

BGXTkpA.jpg

 

 

mMQXMBo.jpg

i have a green hornet theem song ablum. 

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Based on the radio serial that began in 1936, "The Green Hornet" was brought to television in September 1966 by the creative team responsible for the smash ABC series "Batman." William Dozier, who served as the executive producer of both shows, was the uncredited narrator for "Batman." He also provided the voiceover before the opening credits of "The Green Hornet."  

 

 

 

The creator of "The Green Hornet" was George W. Trendle, who also came up with the concept for "The Lone Ranger," which made its radio debut in 1932. There also was a link between the two masked crimefighting heroes. Britt Reid, the character played by Van Williams on the TV version of "The Green Hornet," was the son of Dan Reid, Jr. The elder Reid was the nephew of John Reid, a.k.a. The Lone Ranger.

 

Both shows also used classical music as their theme songs. For "The Lone Ranger," it was Gioachino Rossini's "William Tell Overture." The theme for "The Green Hornet" was Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee." 

 

The TV version of "The Green Hornet" used a recording of "Flight of the Bumblebee" by jazz trumpeter Al Hirt. In 1966, the New Orleans performer released a single titled "Green Hornet Theme" that landed on Billboard's pop chart.

 

Williams appeared with Hirt on the cover photo of the trumpeter's album "The Horn Meets 'The Hornet'."

 

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Margaret Whitton, the actress, director and producer who is probably best know for playing the money-grubbing owner of the Cleveland Indians in two Major League movies, has died after a battle with cancer. She was 67.

 

Her film credits include The Secret Of My Success, 9 1/2 Weeks and Mel Gibson’s Man Without A Face.

 

She began her career on the stage, with credits there including The Public Theater’s production of Dirty Tricks, starring Judith Ivey as Martha Mitchell. She made her directorial debut with 2011’s A Bird On The Air, a Robert Towne adaptation of Joe Coomer’s novel. Whitton most recently was a partner with Steven Tabakin in Tashtego Films, a New York-based film, TV and new media production company. She was an associate producer of the documentary Been Rich All My Life and co-exec producer of Casting By, a 2012 docu on casting directors. 

 

In the Major League movies she played Rachel Phelps the Vegas dancer-turned-baseball owner who inherited the team from her late husband tried to make them awful enough to relocate them to warmer Miami. The 1989 original movie starred Charlie Sheen, Tom Berenger, Wesley Snipes, Corbin Bernsen, Dennis Haysbert and Rene Russo and is considered one of the best baseball movies of all time. There was a 1994 sequel.

 

Whitton’s bio on the Tashtego website says she wrote about baseball for publications including the New York Times, The Village Voice, New York Newsday and The National.

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Peter Vaughan - British character actor Peter Vaughan has died at the age of 93. With an impressive career stretching over 60 years and over 200 credits, he appeared in such films as Village of the Damned, Straw Dogs, The Mackintosh Man, Time Bandits, Brazil, Mountains of the Moon and The Remains of the Day. He had one last major role in HBO's Game of Thrones as the blind old Maester Aemon of the Night's Watch.

 

 

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Joseph Mascolo - Actor Joseph Mascolo has died at the age 87. In a film, television and stage career that lasted nearly 60 years, he appeared in such films as Shaft's Big ScoreJaws 2, and Sharky's Machine. He found his greatest success in television soap operas, with runs on Santa Barbara and General Hospital, and long term on The Bold & the Beautiful. His most lasting role was as arch-villain Stefano DiMera on The Days of Our Lives, which he played on-and-off for nearly 35 years.

 

 

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Associated Press reports this morning that Guyanese-born educator and author E.R. Braithwaite, whose 1959 autobiographical novel To Sir, with Love was adapted into the 1967 Sidney Poitier film, has died. He was 104.

 

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http://bigstory.ap.org/article/997186d6e7fe4c61b3a9f7e2b2944837?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=APEntertainment

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http://variety.com/2016/tv/news/alan-thicke-dead-dies-growing-pains-1201941522/

 

Alan Thicke, the “Growing Pains” star who played one of the quintessential television father of the 1980s, died Tuesday. He was 69.

 

Thicke’s manager confirmed the actor’s death.

 

TMZ reported that Thicke suffered a heart attack while playing hockey with his son. He was then taken to Providence St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Burbank, where he died.

 

Thicke remained a consistent presence on TV in recent years with guest appearances on NBC’s “This Is Us” and Netflix’s “Fuller House.” He also starred on the Pop reality series “Unusually Thicke.”

 

As an actor, he was best known for “Growing Pains,” the multi-camera family comedy that aired on ABC from 1985 to 1992. Thicke played Jason Seaver, a psychiatrist and patriarch of a Long Island family. Working out of the family’s home after his wife went back to work as a reporter, Seaver balanced his professional duties with his role caring for the couple’s three — later four — children.

 

Thicke came to U.S. television after having risen to prominence as a host and frequent talk-show guest in his native Canada. Prior to “Growing Pains,” he hosted a short-lived syndicated late-night talk show, “Thicke of the Night,” that was one of the first efforts at challenging the dominance of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” He was also an accomplished songwriter, having composed the themes to “Diff’rent Strokes” and “The Facts of Life,” as well as several game shows.

 

Born in Kirkland Lake, Ontario in 1947, Thicke attended the University of Western Ontario after graduating from secondary school. He hosted a game show, “First Impressions,” in Canada, as well as a talk show, “The Alan Thicke Show.” He also worked with Normal Lear as producer and head writer on “Fernwood 2 Night,” a spinoff of Lear’s “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman” and a parody talk show whose fictional host was played by actor Martin Mull.

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Welsh actor Bernard Fox died Wednesday in Van Nuys, California. He was 89. A ubiquitous presence on American TV sitcoms throughout the 1960s and '70s, he was probably best known for his long-running recurring role as Dr. Bombay on Bewitched. He also appeared on such popular series of the era as The Andy Griffith Show, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Hogan's Heroes, McHale's Navy, Columbo, M*A*S*H and Murder, She Wrote.

 

On the big screen, Fox appeared in two film retellings of the Titanic disaster. He was the man in the crow's nest who yells "Iceberg ahead!" in A NIGHT TO REMEMBER (1958), and forty years later had a supporting role in James Cameron's 1997 blockbuster TITANIC.

 

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The Hollywood Reporter remembers Bernard Fox here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bernard-fox-dead-bewitched-actor-who-played-dr-bombay-was-89-956294.

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