Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

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Martin Landau is pictured below with Ben Mankiewicz at the TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood on April 6, 2017:

 

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Martin Landau, Legendary ‘Ed Wood’ and ‘North by Northwest’ Actor, Dies at 89-

 

"Martin Landau, a screen giant who brought his one-of-a-kind talents to Hollywood for more than 60 years, has died at 89. TMZ first reported the news, stating that the actor died yesterday of “unexpected complications” after briefly being hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center.

 

Landau won a richly deserved Academy Award for his role as Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s “Ed Wood,” having previously been nominated for both “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Tucker: The Man and His Dream”; he also had three Golden Globes, six Emmy nominations, a BAFTA nod and several lifetime achievement awards to his name.......

 

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/07/martin-landau-dead-dies-ed-wood-1201856034/

 

 

Just found out in the "Off Topics" forum and then on the New York NBC4 News.  Great actor. RIP.

 

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Red West (March 8, 1936- July 18, 2017) - Actor, stuntman, songwriter, and close friend of Elvis Presley, who he attended high school with. After a stint in the Marines, West reconnected with Presley, co-writing some of his songs and appearing in some of his films, like Live a Little, Love a Little, as well as other movies like Walking Tall (1973). After Presley's death, West continued acting, appearing in TV such as Baa Baa Black Sheep, and films such as Road House (1989), The Rainmaker (1997) and Glory Road (2006). He was very good as a grumpy, suicidal old man in 2009's Goodbye Solo

 

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Just found out in the "Off Topics" forum and then on the New York NBC4 News.  Great actor. RIP.

 

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I wonder if TCM will show NBNW in his honor ? They don't show that one very much  :P 

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Actor John Heard, probably best known for his role as the dad in the 1990 cult classic HOME ALONE, has died. He was 72.

 

A constant presence on both the big and small screens over the last four decades, his many other film roles include playing Natassja Kinski's lover in the 1983 remake of CAT PEOPLE, Geraldine Page's son in THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL (1985), a supporting role in Robert Redford's second directorial effort THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR (1988) and roles in two films directed by Penny Marshall -- as Elizabeth Perkins' boyfriend in BIG (1988) and as a doctor opposite Robin Williams and Robert De Niro in AWAKENINGS (1990). In 1999, Heard was nominated for an Emmy Award for his role on the first season of THE SOPRANOS

 

Heard was married -- for six days -- to the actress Margot Kidder, and had a son with actress Melissa Leo.

 

336657_full.jpg​Heard with Carlin Glynn and Rebecca De Mornay in THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL (1985).

 

Variety ​remembers John Heard here: http://variety.com/2017/film/news/john-heard-dead-dies-home-alone-1202503566/

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Two roles that I associate with John Heard were his terrific lead in 1981's Cutter's Way, and the cult horror movie C.H.U.D. (1984).

 

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Joan Micklin Silver's 1979 relationship tale "Chilly Scenes of Winter" -- originally released as "Head Over Heels" -- is a must-see Heard film. It also starred Mary Beth Hurt, Peter Riegert, Kenneth McMillan, Mark Metcalf and Gloria Grahame.

 

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CAT PEOPLE was probably my earliest association with Heard.  I didn't see any of his earlier work until after that.

 

Always liked the guy.  Even when he was playing not so likeable guys.  He'll be missed.

 

RIP

 

 

Sepiatone

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It seems like all the obits I've seen say "John Heard of HOME ALONE" but old me remembers his very first flick BETWEEN THE LINES (1977) about an alternative newspaper.  A true '70's flick co-starring some up-and-comers like Jeff Goldblum and Lindsay Crouse.

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I lost my mother to dementia on Tuesday just a month after she turned 94.  Her mental state had been going downhill since the month began and honestly I was praying for this rather than have her keep growing more frightened and disoriented.  I saw her yesterday and she looked so at peace.  It made me think of all the aged stars we've lost and mourned lately because we like their work; perhaps their loved ones feel the same about them as I do Mom.  May they all truly RIP.        

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I lost my mother 

 

 

I am very sorry for your loss. I understand quite well the turmoil of this time for you. I hope you can take heart in the fact that she is now at rest beyond pain and suffering. 

 

You are in our thoughts and prayers.

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Before marrying Sinatra, Barbara was the wife of Zeppo Marx, by whom she had a son.

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Before marrying Sinatra, Barbara was the wife of Zeppo Marx, by whom she had a son.

 

For a moment there, I thought it was Frank Sinatra's first wife Nancy, who should be turning 100 in a couple of months.

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For a moment there, I thought it was Frank Sinatra's first wife Nancy, who should be turning 100 in a couple of months.

I thought the same thing automatically.

 

BTW-- She's not just his first wife; she's the mother of his three children and the helpmate who supported him and put up with him when he was a nobody.

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That's why Frank liked to keep Alan Ladd around.

 

I wonder if Laddie took his "step-up" Box with him.

 

When Laddie wasn't working with his made in heaven actresses, like Veronica Lake and June Allyson, the studio provided him with a "step-up" Box so he could easily kiss the ladies who were a tad bit taller than him.

 

I also heard that Yul Brynner had to borrow the Box when he was working with the tall and lovely Ingrid Bergman in Anastasia.

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I wonder if Laddie took his "step-up" Box with him.

 

When Laddie wasn't working with his made in heaven actresses, like Veronica Lake and June Allyson, the studio provided him with a "step-up" Box so he could easily kiss the ladies who were a tad bit taller than him.

 

I also heard that Yul Brynner had to borrow the Box when he was working with the tall and lovely Ingrid Bergman in Anastasia.

I imagine it would have been pretty awkward carrying around a step up box

all the time in real life. Maybe he could have had someone come up with

very thick slinkies he could attach to the bottom of his shoes. Hey, there

goes Alan Ladd. He seems taller and has a real spring in his step. Not

being a big Yul Brynner fan, I never realized he wasn't very tall. I can see

him in The Magnificent Seven--Boys you go right ahead, I'll be in in just

a minute, there's something I've go to attend to.

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Two roles that I associate with John Heard were his terrific lead in 1981's Cutter's Way, and the cult horror movie C.H.U.D. (1984).

 

5085c.jpg

 

7741-2725-0.jpg

 

 

Cutter's Way was a much neglected 80s film. Never got the recognition it deserved.........

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http://www.latimes.com/business/hollywood/la-me-marty-sklar-obituary-20170727-story.html

Marty Sklar had only just graduated from UCLA, and here he was shadowing Walt Disney, his demanding new boss.

The fledgling writer was unsure how to make himself useful, but he had a mind to scribble down some of the maxims Disney laced into conversation.

“Know your audience.” “Tell one story at a time.” “Wear your guests' shoes.”

Long after his mentor's death, Sklar recognized the treasure-trove of wisdom he had started compiling at Walt Disney's elbow in the late 1950s. He distilled it all into "Mickey's Ten Commandments," a widely circulated creed that remains a touchstone in the theme park industry.

Walt Disney Co., where he led the creative development of the Burbank company’s parks, attractions and resorts around the world, including its ventures in the cruise business, housing development and the redesign of Times Square in New York.

Sklar died Thursday in his Hollywood Hills home. No cause of death was given. He was 83.

His retirement in 2006 marked the end of an era: He was one of the last remaining executives to have worked alongside Walt Disney in shaping the company into a global powerhouse. Sklar, who last served as principal creative executive of Walt Disney Imagineering, the storied theme park design and development outfit, was so closely associated with the company’s namesake that he became known as the Sorcerer's Apprentice.

“He embodied the very best of Disney, from his bold originality to his joyful optimism and relentless drive for excellence,” Disney Chief Executive Robert Iger said in a statement. “He was also a powerful connection to Walt himself. No one was more passionate about Disney than Marty and we’ll miss his enthusiasm, his grace, and his indomitable spirit.”

Martin “Marty” Sklar was born in New Brunswick, N.J., and attended UCLA, where he was editor of the Daily Bruin newspaper. While there, he got a summer job at Disneyland in 1955 — the year the park opened. Sklar, who grew up in Long Beach, had only just started working at Disneyland when Walt Disney asked him to give a 10-minute presentation on how he would create a newspaper for Main Street, U.S.A., the quaint themed area near the park’s entrance.

"I was frightened. Here I was 21 years old, had never worked professionally," Sklar recalled in a 2002 interview with The Times. "He had time for even the smallest detail, like my newspaper."

Disney was impressed enough with Sklar that he hired him full time to write marketing and sales brochures for Disneyland after he graduated from UCLA in 1956.

Sklar soon became Walt Disney’s lieutenant, and, according to several former colleagues, developed a reputation for being able to channel the boss’ unique style in speeches and other material he’d write on his behalf.

“Walt and he seemed to think alike,” said Dave Smith, Disney’s former chief archivist, who began at the company in 1970. “Marty really understood Walt more than a lot of people.”

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