Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

542 posts in this topic

Theodore Bikel

 

Oscar- and Tony-nominated character actor and folk singer Theodore Bikel, who originated the role of Captain von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” on Broadway and starred in “Fiddler on the Roof” onstage in thousands of performances, died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles. He was 91.

To some, he is best known for his 1990 appearance on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” as the Russian adopted father of the Klingon Worf.

Bikel did his first bigscreen work in John Huston’s 1951 classic “The African Queen” and Huston’s “Moulin Rouge.” After acting in a series of English films, he did supporting work in two high-profile pics in 1957: historical epic “The Pride and the Passion,” starring Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren, and “The Enemy Below,” a WWII submarine thriller starring Robert Mitchum.

He often played Germans or Russians — in his autobiography, Bikel said that his facility with accents resulted in his typecasting “as the poor man’s Peter Ustinov.” But in Stanley Kramer’s 1958 film “The Defiant Ones,” starring Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis, he portrayed a Southern sheriff pursuing a pair of fugitives — and was Oscar nominated for the role.

Bikel had notable supporting turns in Susan Hayward starrer “I Want to Live!” and the remake of “The Blue Angel.” He played dialect expert Zoltan Karpathy in the 1964 film version of “My Fair Lady” and the captain of the Russian submarine in “The Russians are Coming, the Russians Are Coming,” and he appeared in Frank Zappa’s experimental “200 Motels.”

 

http://variety.com/2015/film/news/theodore-bikel-fiddler-on-the-roof-star-dies-at-91-1201544826/

 

 

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Actor GEORGE COE died a couple days ago at age 86.  Same day as Alex Rocco.  He was recently seen on TCM as Dustin Hoffman's boss (the one that fires him) when Turner Classic aired KRAMER VS. KRAMER. 

 

      I saw him in other movies, too, such as THE ENTITY, THE FIRST DEADLY SIN, THE AMATEUR.

 

      I noted THEODORE BIKEL died earlier today at 91.  He and RON MOODY, who also died this year at 91, had famous 1960's musicals covered. 

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Theodore Bikel had recently attended THE TURNER CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL either this year or last year. I remember that he was interviewed.He was a supporting actor in a Susan Hayward film that I like WOMAN OBSESSED 1959. Theodore was in the cast of I BURY THE LIVING 1958. I have never seen the film, but it sounds like a horror flick instead of a film noir.

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Theodore Bikel had recently attended THE TURNER CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL either this year or last year. I remember that he was interviewed.He was a supporting actor in a Susan Hayward film that I like WOMAN OBSESSED 1959. Theodore was in the cast of I BURY THE LIVING 1958. I have never seen the film, but it sounds like a horror flick instead of a film noir.

 

 

Yes, I think "Bury" was the film with Richard Boone and it concerned a cemetary. A mystery/suspenser.

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I remember in an interview (maybe on TCM, I cant remember) he said he took dancing lessons so he wouldnt step on Audrey Hepburn's feet in their dance in MFL......

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I just heard on the news that Roddy Piper (1954-2015) passed away yesterday, July 31.

I'm sorry to hear this. Piper was one of the great quirky unpredictable personalities of the ring and a born entertainer. He and Hogan were memorable opponents. Just last week he was interviewed and defended Hogan against accusations of racism.

 

Never was there a wrestling "bad guy" that I cheered for more gleefully than Piper.

 

I understand it was cardiac arrest while he slept. I guess that's the best way to go but, dammit, he was only 61.

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Minor character actor AL CHECCO died on July 19; two days before what would have been his 94th birthday.  If you've seen 'BULLITT' or 'HOTEL' then you've seen Al Checco. 

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I just heard on the news that Roddy Piper (1954-2015) passed away yesterday, July 31.

loved him in Carpenter's THEY LIVE ('88)

 

[media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJC4R1uXDaE[/media]

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Oh, wow! Haven't thought about "I Bury the Living" for eons.

 

Richard Boone is so young in it. I love how putting the black tipped pins on the cemetery plot spaces, instead of the white ones will consign the holder to a death sentence.

 

Great cult classic and sorry to hear of the death of Bikel.

 

 

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Coleen Gray, star of the film noir classics KISS OF DEATH (1947), NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) and THE KILLING (1956), has died. She was 92. Gray also appeared in a supporting role in the classic Western RED RIVER (1948) as John Wayne's sweetheart.

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers her here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/coleen-gray-dead-kiss-death-812916.

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Coleen Gray, star of the film noir classics KISS OF DEATH (1947), NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) and THE KILLING (1956), has died. She was 92. Gray also appeared in a supporting role in the classic Western RED RIVER (1948) as John Wayne's sweetheart.

 

 

Don't forget her role in Kansas City Confidential which was just on TCM.    Gray was an actress that I admit I just didn't notice until the last 4 or so years especially after re-viewing her noir films Nightmare Alley, Kiss of Death and Kansas City Confidential.    I still want to see Death of a Scoundrel.       

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Coleen Gray, star of the film noir classics KISS OF DEATH (1947), NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) and THE KILLING (1956), has died. She was 92. Gray also appeared in a supporting role in the classic Western RED RIVER (1948) as John Wayne's sweetheart.

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers her here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/coleen-gray-dead-kiss-death-812916.

 

 

SO SORRY to hear this!!! :( I was just thinking of her the other day and wondering if she was still alive. (after watching Kansas City Confidential again) Now I know. :(

 

She was the last of the noir dames still surviving from that panel discussion they had with RO about 15 years ago. I dont know why TCM never reruns it. Would've been perfect for the Summer of Darkness series. :(

 

The others were Marie Windsor, Audrey Totter, I've forgotten the other one now. Was it Jane Greer?

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SO SORRY to hear this!!! :( I was just thinking of her the other day and wondering if she was still alive. (after watching Kansas City Confidential again) Now I know. :(

 

She was the last of the noir dames still surviving from that panel discussion they had with RO about 15 years ago. I dont know why TCM never reruns it. Would've been perfect for the Summer of Darkness series. :(

 

The others were Marie Windsor, Audrey Totter, I've forgotten the other one now. Was it Jane Greer?

R.I.P. Coleen I will always remember you as Molly in NIGHTMARE ALLEY. You stayed with Tyrone until the end, through all his ups and downs. We are fortunate that The SUMMER OF DARKNESS featured you in two film noirs,NIGHTMARE ALLEY and KANSAS CITY COFIDENTIAL. THE KILLERS was shown three months ago in May. Coleen, you willnot be forgotten by your many fans.

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She projected such a fresh faced, girl next door quality in many of her film roles. But there was toughness underneath too.

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Robert Horton

 

http://www.examiner.com/article/movie-tv-and-stage-actor-robert-horton-has-died

 

Boyd Magers at the Western Clippings website has reported that Robert Horton, an actor best known for the western TV series “Wagon Train” has died. He was 91 years old. 

 

Horton played scout Flint McCullough on “Wagon Train” from 1957-1962, quitting the series to explore other pursuits as an actor. He left the show right around the time the star, Ward Bond, died in 1961 [actually he died in 1960], and the series moved from NBC to ABC. He was replaced by Robert Fuller. [Technically Horton was not replaced by Fuller. Horton left in 1962, Fuller joined the show in 1963.]

 

Horton made many film appearances, including Lewis Milestone’s “A Walk in the Sun” and the cult sci-fi favorite, “The Green Slime.” He was on such TV shows as “The Lone Ranger,” and also several dramatic anthology series. On one of these, “King’s Row,” he played the role Ronald Reagan made famous in the movie version. Another interesting television appearance was as an amnesiac in the series “A Man Called Shenandoah.” 

 

Along with his TV and movie work, Horton appeared often on stage. Possessing a fine singing voice, Horton enjoyed success in musical theater, including a 330-performance run on Broadway in a musical version of “The Rainmaker.”  Receiving many lifetime awards for television, including the Golden Boot Award honoring western actors, Horton stopped acting in 1989 and quit making personal appearances in 2009. Horton died in a Los Angeles rehabilitation center.

 

 

Robert Horton always seemed to me like the prototype for a TV (as opposed to movie) western star. His face was rugged, but his voice was soft and his manner low-key -- perfect for the cool medium of television.

 

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A couple of character actor deaths to report:

 

Larry Drake (1950-2016) best known for his role on the TV show L.A. Law, as well as memorable roles in various films including Darkman (1990) and the title role in Dr. Giggles (1992).

 

 

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Joe Santos (1931-2016) best known as LAPD Sergeant Dennis Becker on the TV show The Rockford Files. He also appeared in many films from 1960's through 2010.

 

 

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Oscar-winning film editor Jim Clark
 
 
Jim Clark (right) with John Schlesinger
 
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One of the many adages that circulate in the movie business is that every film is made three times: once when it is written, once when it is shot and once, finally, when it is edited. Like many an old saw it is true, but I believe that it is a truth that can only really be recognised by people who have been physically involved in the making of a film. I don’t think audiences, or film critics or film theorists, for that matter, have any real idea of how a film can be totally reshaped and reinvented in the cutting room. As a film-maker, you hope that the editing process is merely an enhancement of your original vision – but sometimes what occurs in the cutting room can be something entirely new. In that regard great editors can be as important as great film directors or great screenwriters. They can be equal auteurs of a film, when called on – but that is usually when a film is in deep trouble. 

Jim Clark (who died on 25 February at the age of 84) was a great editor – a great British editor – and, indeed, something of a legend in the industry. His career spans a vast swath of British and American film history, from Ealing comedies in the 1950s, to Stanley Donen’s Charade with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn, to a Brosnan Bond, all the way to Mike Leigh’s Happy-Go-Lucky in 2008, the last film he edited. He was known in the business as “Dr Clark” because very frequently he was called on when a film was sick and he was needed to make it well again.

His most famous work of doctoring was forMidnight Cowboy (1969). John Schlesinger was the director, and he realised, when he tried to cut the film together, that it was in dire straits. Jim was called (he and Schlesinger had collaborated on other films) and went to work. He recut the film in its entirety, and it was his idea to put Harry Nilsson singing “Everybody’s Talkin’” on the soundtrack. It is impossible to imagine Midnight Cowboy without Nilsson singing that song. Jim’s new cut won the film three Oscars – including one for Schlesinger’s direction and one for “Best Film”. 

If there was ever an instance of a film being remade a third time in the cutting room, then Midnight Cowboy is the shining exemplar. Everybody thinks Jim also won an Oscar for his heroic editing job, but his credit on the finished movie is only “creative consultant”. There are no Oscars for creative consultants, however vital they are. Jim did win an Oscar later, however, for The Killing Fields in (1984).​

 

 
So Clark was responsible for Midnight Cowboy's greatest scene? (The montage after Joe Buck is first conned by Ratso)

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Another death to report

 

Jan Nemec (1936-2016) Czech filmmaker who was a leading figure in the Czech New Wave of the 1960's.

 

Among his many films were the critically acclaimed Diamonds of the Night (1964) and A Report on the Party and the Guests (1966).

 

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Larry Drake was so believable on LA Law that I though he actually was mentally challenged until seeing him in an interview.  I hope Benny was an inspiration to those folks not born "perfect" but can still contribute to society in their own ways. 

 

Joe Santos did the last season of Magnum, PI  as the police detective who took over for his friend, Lt. Tanaka.  I also saw him as the "guest villain" on a few other crime shows.  He was obviously a very versatile actor; I'm glad TV gave him deserved recognition. 

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