Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

902 posts in this topic

Kim Ki-duk (September 24, 1934 - September 7, 2017) - South Korean director Kim Ki-duk has died. For many years, Kim's directorial feature Yongary, Monster from the Deep (1967) was the most widely seen South Korean feature outside of that region. Made to emulate the then-popular Godzilla movies from Japan, Yongary has become a cult favorite in its own right. Kim directed 66 films from 1961 through 1977.

 

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Jerry Pournelle (August 7, 1933 - September 8, 2017) - Science and science fiction author Jerry Pournelle has died. He was a US Army veteran of the Korean War before earning his PhD in political science. He authored textbooks and worked for various aerospace companies before teaming up with science fiction author Larry Niven on a series of bestselling books, including The Mote in God's Eye (1975), Inferno (1976), Lucifer's Hammer (1977), Oath of Fealty (1981), and Footfall (1985), among others. Pournelle also wrote novels and non-fiction books with other collaborators and on his own.  

 

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How did this news manage to escape us or is it just me being busy with Harvey bugging my sister in Texas and now us folks in Florida.  He was a friend of TCM and I can't remember a time when he wasn't popping up on movie and TV screens in all kinds of roles (I think he could have lived at 4-Star with all the work he did for them).

 

Actor Richard Anderson Dies at 91

LOS ANGELES — Richard Anderson, the tall, handsome actor best known for co-starring simultaneously in the popular 1970s television shows “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman,” has died at age 91.

 

Anderson died of natural causes on Thursday, family spokesman Jonathan Taylor told The Associated Press.

 

“The Six Million Dollar Man” brought a new wave of supernatural heroes to television. Based on the novel “Cyborg” by Martin Caidin, it starred Lee Majors as U.S. astronaut Steve Austin, who is severely injured in a crash. The government saves his life by rebuilding his body with atom-powered artificial limbs and other parts, giving him superhuman strength, speed and other powers.

 

Anderson played Oscar Goldman, Majors’ boss at the secret government spy agency the astronaut went to work for after becoming a cyborg.

 

“Richard became a dear and loyal friend, and I have never met a man like him,” Majors said in a statement Thursday, adding the two first met when they filmed several episodes of another hit television show, the 1960s western “The Big Valley.”

 

“I called him ‘Old Money.’ His always stylish attire, his class, calmness and knowledge never faltered in his 91 years,” Majors said, adding Anderson was “still the sweet charming man” when they spoke just a few weeks ago.

 

“The Six Million Dollar Man” began as a TV movie in 1973 and when it proved a hit it was turned into a weekly series the following year. Its popularity led to the 1976 spinoff show, “The Bionic Woman,” starring Lindsay Wagner.  Anderson took on the Oscar Goldman role in that show, too, sometimes appearing from week to week in both series.

 

“I can’t begin to say how much I have always admired and have been grateful for the elegance and loving friendship I was blessed to have with Richard Anderson,” Wagner said in a statement.

 

In real life, Majors recalled,  Anderson  embraced tennis, traveling the world to play in tournaments.

 

“He loved his daughters, tennis and his work as an actor,” he said.

 

Anderson, who stood 6-feet-4, began his career in 1949 with a small role as a wounded soldier in “12 O’Clock High.” Soon after, his comedy scenes in a TV series called “Lights, Camera, Action!” drew the attention of MGM, which offered him a screen test and a contract.

 

He had decided to try acting after watching Gary Cooper movies, and at the screen test he performed a scene from Cooper’s “The Cowboy and the Lady.”

 

At MGM he played secondary roles in such movies as “The Magnificent Yankee,” “Across the Wide Missouri,” “Scaramouche,” “The Story of Three Loves,” “The Student Prince,” “Hit the Deck” and “Forbidden Planet.”

 

“When people ask me where I received my education, I tell them it was at MGM U,” the Internet Movie Database quoted him as saying. “The biggest lessons that I learned is that acting is a talent. You can’t teach it. And even if you have the talent, you have to get the part.”

 

When MGM began thinning out its contract list in the late 1950s, Anderson was let go.  He went on
to make movies for other studios, appearing in such films as Stanley Kubrick’s “Paths of Glory,” “The Long Hot Summer,” “Compulsion,’ “The Wackiest Ship in the Navy,” “The Gathering of Eagles,” “Johnny Cool,” “Seven Days in May” and “Kitten With a Whip.”

 

Anderson was also a frequent guest on TV series and had regular roles on “Bus Stop,” “Perry Mason,” “Dan August” and “The Fugitive.”

 

Other television credits included “Slattery’s People,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Virginian,” “The Rifleman,” “Bonanza,” “Mannix” and “The Mod Squad.”

 

He also acted as producer when “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” were revived in later years as TV movies.

 

Richard Norman Anderson was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, on Aug. 8, 1926. He later moved to Los Angeles, where he began appearing in high school plays.  After two years in the Army, he
began studying at the Actors Laboratory in Los Angeles. Soon he was landing work in radio and summer stock productions.

 

Anderson was married and divorced twice. His first wife, Carol Lee Ladd, was the daughter of actor Alan Ladd.

 

His second wife, Katharine Thalberg, was the daughter of actress Norma Shearer and movie mogul Irvin Thalberg. The couple had three daughters, Ashley Anderson, Brooke Anderson and Deva Anderson, who survive him.

 

The family says memorial services will be private.

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Len Wein (June 12, 1948 - September 9, 2017) - Comic book writer and editor responsible for co-creating several iconic characters, including Swamp Thing for DC Comics, and Wolverine, Storm, Nightcrawler, and Colossus for Marvel Comics. He also wrote for other titles such as SupermanThe FlashTeen Titans, and Batman for DC, and The Amazing Spider-ManThe Incredible Hulk, and Thor for Marvel.

 

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PBS NewsHourVerified account @NewsHour 2h2 hours ago

 
 

Xavier Atencio, Pinocchio, Fantasia creator and co-writer for lyrics to Pirates of the Caribbean ride theme song, also died today at 98.

 

"Atencio was a favorite of Walt Disney’s for his versatility as an animator, tunesmith, writer, and innovator who brought indelible touches to some of Disneyland’s best-loved attractions.

“X was an enormous talent who helped define so many of our best experiences around the world,” said Bob Weis, president of Walt Disney Imagineering.

 

“Some may not know that when he wrote the lyrics for ‘Yo Ho’ he had never actually written a song before. He simply proposed the idea of a tune for Pirates of the Caribbean, and Walt told him to go and do it. That was how X worked—with an enthusiastic, collaborative attitude, along with a great sense of humor.....

 

http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/x-atencio-disney-animator-imagineer-dead-98-pirates-of-the-caribbean-1202555083/

 

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Basil Gogos (1949-2017) - Famed illustrator Basil Gogos has died. He's most famous for his lurid and colorful covers for the magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland from the 1960's through the 1970's. After that he concentrated on a fine art career, and found success, although he later returned to horror-themed illustrations for album covers by artists such as The Misfits and Rob Zombie.

 

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RIP Stanislav Petrov: Russian colonel who saved world from all-out nuclear war

Quiet hero dies at 77
 

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...

 

Petrov's job wasn't to push the metaphorical red button, but to warn Soviet high command if it might need to. If an ICBM was launched from a US ground launch site, it would take about 30 minutes to reach the motherland, and it was highly likely that Soviet commanders would trust his launch recommendation.

 

Has this thing passed QA tests?

 

September 26, 1983

 

Petrov knew that the Oko system was new and still had bugs to iron out. He also knew that logically the US would never launch just five missiles against the USSR and await retaliation – first strike doctrine was that you threw everything you could at the enemy in hopes of blunting the response.

 

So Petrov held back from letting his superiors know until he could correlate Oko's data against other sources. As a result it was found that, due to faults in the system, what Oko had been detecting were flashes of sunshine on the tops of heavy clouds.

 

While initially Petrov was praised for his perspicacity, that didn't last. Before long top brass acted against him, demoting the officer for a paperwork error. He got the message and retired a year later to become a military contractor.

 

...

 

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/18/stanislav_petrov_obit/

 

 

 

To tie this in to movies, this docudrama was made from the incident:

 

The Man Who Saved the World (2014)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2277106/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1a

 

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Jake LaMotta, the boxer, former Middleweight Champion, actor and stand-up comedian, died on September 19, 2017. He was 96 years old.

 

LaMotta was portrayed onscreen by Robert DeNiro in Martin Scorsese's classic RAGING BULL (1980). He also acted in movies and on TV himself, most memorably as the bartender in the classic Paul Newman film THE HUSTLER (1961).

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Ben Hammer (December 8, 1924 - September 18, 2017) - Prolific character actor of films and television with a career stretching back to the early 1950's. Hammer's film appearances include Invasion of the Bee Girls (1973), The Beastmaster (1982), Jagged Edge (1985), Crazy People (1990), and Sleepers (1996), among others, and TV appearances in shows like M Squad, Peter Gunn, Mission: Impossible, Dragnet, Bonanza and many more, including a late career recurring role as a judge on Law & Order.

 

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Jan Triska (November 4, 1936 - September 25, 2017) - Czech character actor who made a name for himself on both the stage and screen in his native country before making his English-language debut in fellow countryman Milos Forman's 1981 film Ragtime. Triska also appeared in Reds (1981), The Osterman Weekend (1983), Uncommon Valor (1983), Unfaithfully Yours (1984), 2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984), The Karate Kid III (1989), The People vs Larry Flynt (1996), Ronin (1998), and Zelary (2003), among others, as well as numerous TV appearances.

 

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Barry Dennen (February 22, 1938 - September 26, 2017) - American character actor perhaps best known for his role as Pontius Pilate in 1973's Jesus Christ Superstar. After making a name for himself as the MC in the London stage production of Cabaret, Dennen started getting film roles, including Fiddler On the Roof (1971), Brannigan (1975), The Kentucky Fried Movie (1977), The Shining (1980), Shock Treatment (1981), Ragtime (1981), Trading Places (1983), Superman III (1983),and Titanic (1997), amassing over 120 credits in his career.

 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/hugh-hefner-dead-playboy-founder-sexual-trailblazer-was-91-708796

 

Hugh Hefner, who parlayed $8,000 in borrowed money in 1953 to create Playboy, the hot-button media empire renowned for a magazine enriched with naked women and intelligent interviews just as revealing, has died. He was 91.

 

"My father lived an exceptional and impactful life as a media and cultural pioneer and a leading voice behind some of the most significant social and cultural movements of our time in advocating free speech, civil rights and sexual freedom," read a statement from Hefner's son, Cooper Hefner, chief creative officer of Playboy Enterprises. 

The company announced that Hefner died in his home at the Playboy Mansion of natural causes on Wednesday.

 

While most famous for Playboy, the businessman dabbled in all forms of media, including hosting his own TV shows, beginning with Playboy’s Penthouse in the late 1950s and early '60s. Shot in his hometown of Chicago and syndicated, the show featured Hefner in a tuxedo and smoking a pipe surrounded by “playmates” and interviewing such celebrities as Bob Newhart, Don Adams and Sammy Davis Jr.

 

The show boosted his personal and professional reputation and promoted what eventually became known as the “Playboy Philosophy,” a lifestyle that included politically liberal sensibilities, nonconformity and, of course, sophisticated parties with expensive accouterments and the ever-present possibility for recreational sex – though Hefner maintained he was a relative late bloomer in that department, remaining a virgin until he was 21.

 

Hefner followed that show with Playboy After Dark, which had a similar format but with more rock 'n’ roll, including appearances by The Grateful Dead, Three Dog Night, Harry Nilsson and Linda Ronstadt. The syndicated Screen Gems show was taped at CBS in Los Angeles and ran for 52 episodes in 1969-70.

Hefner also co-produced hundreds of Playboy-branded videos and a few feature films, such as Roman Polanski’s Macbeth and Monty Python’s first film, And Now for Something Completely Different, both released in 1971. He had been a sought-after guest on TV shows as far back as 1969 when he played a Control agent in an episode of Get Smart, and more recently he appeared on Curb Your Enthusiasm, Entourage and Sex and the City as well as in animated shows like The Simpsons and Family Guy.

Hefner also made cameos in several movies, most recently 2008’s The House Bunny, which told the fictional story of a Playboy “bunny,” played by Anna Faris, who has been kicked out of the Playboy Mansion, the famous real-life, 22,000-square-foot house in Los Angeles where Hefner lived for more than four decades and where he hosted famously decadent parties that attracted celebrities A-list through D.

 

The house sold for $100 million in August with the provision that Hefner be allowed to live there the rest of his life.

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Lest we forget - Hugh Hefner did A LOT for film preservation!

 

You're right! He was passionate about motion pictures. As Roger Ebert once wrote, there were three movie nights at the Playboy mansion near Beverly Hills: Friday nights for classic films, Sundays for new releases and Wednesday for pictures selected by popular demand.

 

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Hefner and his Playmate wife Crystal screened "Casablanca" on his 89th birthday -- April 9, 2015

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Lest we forget - Hugh Hefner did A LOT for film preservation!

 

Yancey

 

Yes he did an awful lot for film restoration,he would have been a great interview with R Osborne or even as a guest on the Essentials,he had prodigious knowledge to share,he was also an innovator, his club in Chicago I think was the first one to accept Afro American freely,well at 91 he had a great life.

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Yes he did an awful lot for film restoration,he would have been a great interview with R Osborne or even as a guest on the Essentials,he had prodigious knowledge to share,he was also an innovator, his club in Chicago I think was the first one to accept Afro American freely,well at 91 he had a great life.

 

Hef was one of the first TCM guest programmers in April 2005. His choices: five Humphrey Bogart films, "Casablanca," "To Have and Have Not,"  "The Maltese Falcon," "The Big Sleep" and "Dark Passage."

 

The photo below shows him being greeted by actor Richard Roundtree at the 2011 TCM Film Fest's showing of "An American in Paris" at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

 

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Hef was one of the first TCM guest programmers in April 2005. His choices: five Humphrey Bogart films, "Casablanca," "To Have and Have Not,"  "The Maltese Falcon," "The Big Sleep" and "Dark Passage."

 

The photo below shows him being greeted by actor Richard Roundtree at the 2011 TCM Film Fest's showing of "An American in Paris" at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

 

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Too bad I missed it I finally got TCM in june 2006,Hef would have been great as mc for Silent Sundays, with his pajama ,his great love for silent films he would have been the perfect choice,a great American icon is gone and now he will rest next to Marylin Monroe,a great life and a fabulous afterlife!

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Too bad I missed it I finally got TCM in june 2006,Hef would have been great as mc for Silent Sundays, with his pajama ,his great love for silent films he would have been the perfect choice,a great American icon is gone and now he will rest next to Marylin Monroe,a great life and a fabulous afterlife!

 

As someone remarked today, the afterlife won't be as much fun!

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http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/anne-jeffreys-dead-dies-topper-general-hospital-1202575270/

 

Anne Jeffreys, the actress and singer known for her roles in the 1950s sitcom “Topper” and long-running daytime soap opera “General Hospital,” has died. She was 94.

 

News of her death was first reported by George Pennacchio, an entertainment reporter with ABC7, who tweeted “The beautiful and elegant actress, Anne Jeffreys, has died at 94. She was a sweetheart.”

 

Jeffreys’ career started in the early 1940s with a number of film roles including “Step Lively,” a musical starring Frank Sinatra. In the late ’40s she turned to Broadway. She replaced Patricia Morison in “Kiss Me, Kate” in 1948, and also appeared in the 1952 musical “Three Wishes for Jamie.”

 

Between 1952 and 1955 she starred in the CBS sitcom “Topper.” Her husband, Robert Sterling, was also part of the show’s central cast. Jeffreys played Marion Kerby, billed in the credits as “the ghostess with the mostest.”

 

In the ’60s she appeared in television shows including “L.A. Law” and “Murder, She Wrote.” Her role in 1972’s “The Delphi Bureau” earned her a Golden Globe nomination.

 

For two decades, between 1984 and 2004, she appeared in “General Hospital” as wealthy socialite Amanda Barrington. She also appeared in the its spinoff, “Port Charles.” Her most recent credit was in a 2013 episode of “Getting On.”

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituaries/2017/09/29/jack-good-man-put-pop-music-television-obituary/

 

Jack Good, who has died aged 86, was the television producer who introduced grey 1950s Britain to the disturbing new phenomenon of rock and roll, launching the careers of, among others, Cliff Richard, Tommy Steele, Adam Faith, Marty Wilde and Billy Fury, and introducing Buddy Holly and Gene Vincent to British audiences.​

 

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Until a few moments ago I had no idea he'd played Trevor Howard's flunky in Father Goose. I'd always pictured him as a cigar-chewing Sid James type.

 

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I was never too crazy about LMAD, but Monty Hall himself had a refreshing sense of humor, as he showed in interviews.

 

At the height of his fame in the early-to-mid '70s, when he was one of ABC's few stars, he hosted several TV specials as well starring in two funny Odd Couple episodes.
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Hall was the father of the veteran actress Joanna Gleason, most recently a cast member of the Showtime series "The Affair." She won a 1988 Tony Award as Best Actress in a Musical for her performance as The Baker's Wife in Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's "Into the Woods."  She is married to actor Chris Sarandon. 

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