Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

946 posts in this topic

I was never too crazy about LMAD, but Monty Hall himself had a refreshing sense of humor, as he showed in interviews.

 

At the height of his fame in the early-to-mid '70s, when he was one of ABC's few stars, he hosted several TV specials as well starring in two funny Odd Couple episodes.

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This was one of the many memorable great episodes of my favorite 70s sitcom, Garry Marshall's The Odd Couple, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman.

 

Thank-you!

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Chuck Low (July 21, 1928 - September 18, 2017) - Character actor frequently appearing in the films of Robert De Niro (Low at one time had been De Niro's landlord). He's probably best remembered as the obnoxious Morrie Kessler in 1990's Goodfellas. He also had small roles in The King of ComedyOnce Upon a Time in AmericaThe MissionMistressNight and the City, and Sleepers, as well as a handful of TV roles. 

 

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Anne Wiazemsky (May 14, 1947 - October 5, 2017) - French actress and writer who appeared in a few notable films, particularly Robert Bresson's 1966 film Au Hasard Balthazar, as well as Jean-Luc Godard's La Chinoise (1967), Week End (1967), and One Plus One (1968). She was Godard's second wife, from 1967 to 1979. She later became a successful novelist.

 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bob-schiller-dead-i-love-lucy-writer-was-98-1047459

Bob Schiller, the legendary sitcom writer known for his work on such shows as I Love Lucy and All in the Family, died Tuesday. He was 98.

Schiller, who collaborated with his late writing partner, Bob Weiskopf, for nearly a half-century, died at his home in Pacific Palisades, his daughter, Sadie Novello, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Best known for being the first (and only) additions to the original writing team for I Love Lucy, Schiller and Weiskopf came up with some of that series' most beloved episodes, including the one that guest-starred John Wayne and the one that featured Lucy (Lucille Ball) "grape stomping" in Italy.

For All in the Family, the pair penned the two-part episode "Edith's 50th Birthday" in which Edith (Jean Stapleton) is the victim of an attempted rape.

They also wrote for such popular 1950s comedies such as Make Room for Daddy, The Bob Cummings Show, My Favorite Husband, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Ann Sothern Show and Pete and Gladys.

Their partnership continued through the '60s, '70s and '80s, writing and/or producing for The Lucy Show, The Red Skelton Show, The Good Guys, The Phyllis Diller Show, The Carol Burnett Show, The Flip Wilson Show, Maude and Archie Bunker's Place.

The pair carpooled to the office during most of their career and played off each other perfectly — in writing and in person. When Schiller was once asked the reason for the success of their partnership, he responded, "That's easy — we've never agreed on anything!" Weiskopf's witty retort: "Yes, we have."

Schiller won two Emmys (shared with Weiskopf for their work on Flip and All in the Family), and they received the Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for lifetime achievement from the Writers Guild of America in 1988.

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/elizabeth-baur-dead-ironside-actress-was-69-1047822

 

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Elizabeth Baur, who helped Raymond Burr bring the bad guys to justice as Officer Fran Belding on the long-running NBC crime drama Ironside, has died. She was 69.

Baur died Sept. 30 in Los Angeles following a lengthy illness, publicist Paul Gendreau announced.

On Ironside, which starred Burr as a San Francisco police consultant who solves crimes from his wheelchair, Baur effectively stepped in for Barbara Anderson (as Eve Whitfield), who exited the show after the fourth season.

 

Belding's character was introduced when she helped Robert Ironside and his team nab the gamblers who had murdered her father.

Baur went on to appear in 89 episodes over four seasons until the show's conclusion in 1975, then came back for the 1993 telefilm The Return of Ironside.

Earlier, Baur starred as Teresa O'Brien, the ward of a rancher (Andrew Duggan), for two seasons on the 1968-1970 CBS Western Lancer.

A native of Los Angeles, Baur began her career as a contract player at 20th Century Fox and appeared in the Tony Curtis film The Boston Strangler (1968). She then moved to Universal, where she continued her TV work until exiting the industry to raise her daughter, Lesley Worton, now a producer.

Baur also appeared on such shows as Batman, Daniel Boone, Room 222, Emergency!, Police Woman, Fantasy Island and Remington Steele.

Survivors also include her husband Steve and a first cousin, Cagney & Lacey star Sharon Gless.

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/nora-johnson-dead-world-henry-orient-novelist-screenwriter-was-84-1047860

 

Nora Johnson, who adapted her novel The World of Henry Orient for the popular 1964 big-screen adaptation that starred Peter Sellers, has died. She was 84.

Johnson died Thursday in Dallas, one of her daughters, Marion Siwek, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Her father was two-time Oscar nominee Nunnally Johnson, the screenwriter, producer and director behind such Hollywood classics as The Grapes of WrathThe Three Faces of EveThe Man in the Gray Flannel Suit and The Dirty Dozen.

The World of Henry Orient, first published in 1958 when the author was just 25, came from Johnson's infatuation with Oscar Levant, the witty concert pianist and actor. In her novel, two 13-year-old girls at a Manhattan private school develop a crush on Orient after seeing him in concert and then follow him all around the city.

Sellers portrayed the philandering pianist in the George Roy Hill film, with Tippy Walker and Merrie Spaeth as the students. Angela Lansbury, Tom Bosley and Paula Prentiss also starred. Johnson and her father teamed up for the movie adaptation.

In his review for The New York Times, Bosley Crowther called The World of Henry Orient "one of the most joyous and comforting movies about teenagers that we've had in a long time."

Johnson's novel also served as the basis for a 1967 Broadway musical, Henry, Sweet Henry, with Don Ameche starring as Orient. (Her dad also wrote the book for that production.)

Johnson published several other novels and books, including 2004's Coast to Coast: A Family Romance, about her childhood that included being shuttled between Manhattan and Hollywood. (Her mother, journalist Marion Byrnes, had left her husband when Johnson was very young and often took her to New York.)

Johnson was born in Hollywood, and Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall attended her birthday parties. She graduated from Smith College in 1954.

Survivors include another daughter, Paula, and a son, Justin.

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/elizabeth-baur-dead-ironside-actress-was-69-1047822

 

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Elizabeth Baur, who helped Raymond Burr bring the bad guys to justice as Officer Fran Belding on the long-running NBC crime drama Ironside, has died. She was 69.

 

Survivors also include her husband Steve and a first cousin, Cagney & Lacey star Sharon Gless.

 

This I did not know.  There is a slight resemblance between the two although Elizabeth's demeanor was more classic while Sharon's is freer and outgoing.  One thing they shared was talent.  She died way too young.

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Roy Dotrice (May 26, 1923 - October 16, 2017) - British stage and screen actor Roy Dotrice has died at the age of 94. Dotrice, a WWII Royal Air Force veteran and POW, worked extensively in radio, theater, television, and films, in both the UK and the US. Among his more memorable roles were as the title character's disapproving father in 1984's Amadeus; a character know simply as "Father" in TV's Beauty and the Beast (1987-1990); and Picket Fences (1992-1996). Other films include The Heroes of Telemark (1965), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Cutting Edge (1992), Swimming with Sharks (1994), and Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008). Dotrice amassed 120 film and TV credits in a career that lasted 55 years.

 

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Don Pedro Colley (August 30, 1938 - October 10, 2017) - Actor Don Pedro Colley has died. He appeared in many television and film roles over the course of his nearly 50-year screen career. He was a regular on TV's Daniel Boone during the 1968-1969 season, as well as a regular on The Dukes of Hazzard from 1981-1984. He appeared in such films as Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970), THX-1138 (1971), Black Caesar (1973), Sugar Hill (1974), Herbie Rides Again (1974), and The Blue Iguana (1988). 

 

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/danielle-darrieux-luminous-beauty-of-french-cinema-dies-at-100/2017/10/19/ac2af782-b4bb-11e7-be94-fabb0f1e9ffb_story.html?utm_term=.a0fba3603b92

 

Danielle Darrieux, a luminous beauty of French cinema whose portrayals of wistful ingenues, romantic temptresses and tragic adultresses spanned more than eight decades, died Oct. 18 at her home in Bois-le-Roi, France. She was 100.

Her companion, Jacques Jenvrin, confirmed the death to Agence France-Presse but did not provide the cause.

Ms. Darrieux’s poise, languid glamour and fine singing voice catapulted her to stardom as a teenager in the early 1930s and kept her there for decades, whether in melodramas, frisky comedies or light musicals. She appeared in well over 100 films in addition to her work in television and theater.

Her career was seriously threatened immediately after World War II, when she faced accusations of collaboration with the wartime Vichy regime and the German government. But she managed to clear her name, and her career continued unimpeded through the years.

If her pre-war movies emphasized her sparkle and charm, the postwar years elicited some of her most riveting dramatic performances. Much of her critical legacy rests on three celebrated films she made with director Max Ophuls: “La Ronde” (1950), “Le Plaisir” (1952) and “The Earrings of Madame de ...” (1953).

They are love stories, droll, anguished and highly theatrical in their plotting and swirling camera movements. In “La Ronde,” she was the understanding paramour of a young man facing sudden impotence. She was a prostitute in “Le Plaisir,” based on stories by Guy de Maupassant, and in “Earrings” she played an aristocratic officer’s bored wife whose life is upended when she finds passion outside her marriage.

“These are extraordinary pieces of filmmaking,” Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan said in an interview for this obituary. “If you love film as visual medium, these are some of the masterpieces, and Darrieux was one of Ophuls’ muses. ‘Earrings’ is a quintessentially romantic film but a very artificial story, and it takes a really great actress to take this artificial character — an artificial character in an artificial art — to make it real and moving and subtle. She is quite a presence.”

Ms. Darrieux brought a tender and restrained sympathy to what she regarded as her most delicately calibrated performance: the married woman who falls in love with an opportunistic young man (Gerard Philipe) in “Le rouge et le noir” (“The Red and the Black,” 1954), based on the Stendhal novel set in post-Napoleonic France.

In addition to her movie roles, Ms. Darrieux worked in television and theater. In 1970, she replaced Katharine Hepburn on Broadway as the indomitable Gallic entrepreneur Coco Chanel in the musical “Coco.”

The change was greeted warmly by critics. As Mel Gussow dryly noted in his New York Times review, “She is French, and she can sing.” More than that, he wrote, she imbued the role with the hallmarks of a Darrieux performance: beauty, charm, flirtatiousness and vulnerability.

The film historian David Shipman noted those qualities when he wrote, “It is always an unpleasant surprise to all young men when they first go to France that all Frenchwomen are not like Danielle Darrieux.”

Danielle Yvonne Marie Antoinette Darrieux was born May 1, 1917, in Bordeaux, the daughter of an eye doctor and Algerian concert singer. Her father died within a few years, and her family, now in Paris, struggled on her mother’s income from giving music lessons.

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Umberto Lenzi (August 6, 1931 - October 19, 2017) - Italian director of B-movies, prolific in the 60's, 70's, and 80's. Perhaps his most widely-known film was 1978's The Biggest Battle aka Battle Force, a WW2 epic starring Helmut Berger, Samantha Eggar, John Huston, Stacy Keach, and Henry Fonda. Among his other directorial efforts are Samson and the Slave Queen (1963), A Pistol for a Hundred Coffins (1968), Seven Blood-Stained Orchids (1972), Eaten Alive! (1980), Nightmare City (1980), Cannibal Ferox (1981), Ironmaster (1982), and Ghosthouse (1988), among others, amassing 65 directing credits in his 34 year career behind the camera.

 

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Danielle Darrieux made only a handful of films in America, but she made an impression as a countess who straddled both sides of the diplomatic fence in neutral Turkey during WWII in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's wonderful FIVE FINGERS (1952).

 

She also had one of my favourite lines of dialogue in that same film, playing a woman who lives a luxurious lifestyle, often by means of her wits and charm.

 

At one point, when catching sight of a German clerk of ordinary means who was looking longingly at her, Darrieux drolly stated, "Please do not look at me as if you had a source of income other than your salary."

 

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Danielle Darrieux made only a handful of films in America, but she made an impression as a countess who straddled both sides of the diplomatic fence in neutral Turkey during WWII in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's wonderful FIVE FINGERS (1952).

 

She also had one of my favourite lines of dialogue in that same film, playing a woman who lives a luxurious lifestyle, often by means of her wits and charm.

 

At one point, when catching sight of a German clerk of ordinary means who was looking longingly at her, Darrieux drolly stated, "Please do not look at me as if you had a source of income other than your salary."

 

 

 

That clerk is the guy that started the entire MGTOW movement.     :lol:

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Federico Luppi (February 23, 1936 - October 20, 2017) - Argentinian actor who appeared in many films from all over the Spanish-speaking world, from his home country to Chile, Mexico, Spain, and a few in the U.S. He is probably best known in the US for his collaborations with Mexican director Guillermo Del Toro, starting with 1993's Cronos in which Luppi starred. He also had roles in Del Toro's The Devil's Backbone (2001) and Pan's Labyrinth (2006), and in John Sayles' film Men with Guns (1997). He amassed over 130 films and TV credits in his 50+ year career.

 

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Danielle Darrieux made only a handful of films in America, but she made an impression as a countess who straddled both sides of the diplomatic fence in neutral Turkey during WWII in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's wonderful FIVE FINGERS (1952).

 

She also had one of my favourite lines of dialogue in that same film, playing a woman who lives a luxurious lifestyle, often by means of her wits and charm.

 

At one point, when catching sight of a German clerk of ordinary means who was looking longingly at her, Darrieux drolly stated, "Please do not look at me as if you had a source of income other than your salary."

 

19525fingers6.jpg

 

My brother gave me a gift set of the three Ophuls' films in which Darrieux appeared, and I treasure them.   I find her performance in "The Earrings of Madame..." subtle and ultimately moving (also Charles Boyer is at his cruelest in this one, perhaps crueler in some ways than in "Gaslight").  I'm of 100% French descent (French Canadian) and was raised Roman Catholic (but am now lapsed), and I find the Gallic humor in the first Communion segment of "Les Plaisir" pure delight.  My brother claims, "Danielle Darrieux is the reason God made France."

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I had the chance to work with Brent on IN THE VALLEY OF ELAH. In addition to being a good, solid actor he was a helluva nice guy. RIP Brent.  Maybe one day I will move to the Valley!

 

Yancey

 

From the Hollywood Reporter -

 

Brent Briscoe, Actor in 'Sling Blade' and 'A Simple Plan,' Dies at 56

 

Brent Briscoe, the busy character actor who appeared alongside Billy Bob Thornton in Sling Blade and A Simple Plan and played Det. Dave Macklay on the recently revived Twin Peaks, has died. He was 56.

 

Briscoe died Wednesday in Los Angeles, a family spokesperson announced on Facebook. No cause of death was immediately available. 

 

Briscoe also had a recurring role as the diner owner J.J. on the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation and played Sheriff Cecil Coleman in Frank Darabont's The Majestic (2001).

 

Briscoe starred as Lou Chambers, one of the three men who come upon a crashed plane filled with cash, in Sam Raimi's A Simple Plan (1998). Earlier, he was Scooter, one of the repair shop employees who takes a liking to Thornton's character, Karl, in Sling Blade (1996). Thornton, of course, wrote and directed the acclaimed drama as well.

 

Briscoe and Thornton also appeared onscreen in U Turn (1997), Mr. Woodcock (2007), The Smell of Success (2009) and Jayne Mansfield's Car (2012), and he and former college roommate Mark Fauser co-wrote and acted in the 2002 romantic comedy Waking Up in Reno, starring Thornton. 

A native of Moberly, Mo., Briscoe attended Moberly High School and the University of Missouri before serving as an apprentice in 1985 at The Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre in Jupiter, Fla. His first onscreen credit came in 1990 on Reynolds' CBS sitcom, Evening Shade.

 

Briscoe also was a staff writer on the Linda Bloodworth-Thomason comedy and teamed with Fauser on the teleplay for The Right to Remain Silent, a 1996 movie at Showtime.

Before he was Macklay on Twin Peaks, Briscoe played another cop, Detective Domgaard, in Lynch's Mulholland Drive (2001).

 

Briscoe's film résumé also included Milos Forman's Man on the Moon (1999), Darabont's The Green Mile (1999), Raimi's Spider-Man 2 (2004), Paul Haggis' In the Valley of Elah (2007), Jon Turteltaub's National Treasure: Book of Secrets (2007) and Beneath (2013).

 

On television, Briscoe also showed up on Deadwood, 24, Grey's Anatomy, Scandal, Desperate Housewives, Justified, NCIS and Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

 

Survivors include his father Carl, sister Shelley and brother Kent.

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I had the chance to work with Brent on IN THE VALLEY OF ELAH. In addition to being a good, solid actor he was a helluva nice guy. RIP Brent.  Maybe one day I will move to the Valley!

 

This is a real shame. He was fantastic in A Simple Plan. Very genuine. RIP

 

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Walter Lassally (December 18, 1926 - October 23, 2017) - Oscar-winning cinematographer whose most noteworthy work was on the films A Taste of Honey (1961), The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Tom Jones (1963), Zorba the Greek (1964, for which he won his Oscar), Heat and Dust (1983), and The Bostonians (1984). Late in life he took a turn in front of the camera, acting in Richard Linklater's 2013 film Before Midnight.

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Harry Stradling Jr., the Oscar-nominated cinematographer of 1776 (1972) and THE WAY WE WERE (1973), died on October 17, 2017 at the Motion Picture Home. He was 92 years old.

He was the son of Harry Stradling, whose credits include A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE (1951), THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY (1945) and scores of others. Between the father and son, says International Cinematographers Guild president Stephen Poster, "they spanned almost the entire history of the motion picture industry before the end of the last century." 

Stradling Jr. worked extensively in westerns, on the TV series Gunsmoke and such films as SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SHERIFF! (1969). He began his career as George Cukor's camera assistant on GASLIGHT (1944) and went on to work with his dad on GUYS AND DOLLS (1955) and GYPSY (1962). 

Stradling Jr. also collaborated with Blake Edwards on several films, including S.O.B. (1981) and A FINE MESS (1986). His other credits include Billy Wilder's BUDDY BUDDY (1980), the WWII drama MIDWAY (1976) and Doris Day's final movie WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL (1968).

Variety remembers Harry Stradling, Jr. here: http://variety.com/2017/film/obituaries-people-news/harry-stradling-jr-dead-dies-92-1202601466/

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John Mollo (March 18, 1931 - October 25, 2017) - British costume designer who worked on a number of notable films, including Star Wars (1977), Alien (1979), Outland (1981), Gandhi (1982), Greystoke (1984), Revolution (1985), Cry Freedom (1987), Chaplin (1992), The Three Musketeers (1993), and Event Horizon (1997). 

He won two Oscars, for Star Wars and Gandhi, and was nominated for 5 BAFTAs.

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12 hours ago, Barton_Keyes said:

Harry Stradling Jr., the Oscar-nominated cinematographer of 1776 (1972) and THE WAY WE WERE (1973), died on October 17, 2017 at the Motion Picture Home. He was 92 years old.

He was the son of Harry Stradling, whose credits include A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE (1951), THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY (1945) and scores of others. Between the father and son, says International Cinematographers Guild president Stephen Poster, "they spanned almost the entire history of the motion picture industry before the end of the last century." 

Stradling Jr. worked extensively in westerns, on the TV series Gunsmoke and such films as SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SHERIFF! (1969). He began his career as George Cukor's camera assistant on GASLIGHT (1944) and went on to work with his dad on GUYS AND DOLLS (1955) and GYPSY (1962). 

Stradling Jr. also collaborated with Blake Edwards on several films, including S.O.B. (1981) and A FINE MESS (1986). His other credits include Billy Wilder's BUDDY BUDDY (1980), the WWII drama MIDWAY (1976) and Doris Day's final movie WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL (1968).

Variety remembers Harry Stradling, Jr. here: http://variety.com/2017/film/obituaries-people-news/harry-stradling-jr-dead-dies-92-1202601466/

Harry Stradling was the finest  color musical Cinematographer of the Golden Age. He worked at MGM for Judy Garland and Fred Astaire musicals, such as, Easter Parade, the Barkleys of Broadway, the Pirate, Words and Music and In the Good old Summertime.

Stradling capped the Golden Age musical by being the cinematographer for all three of Barbra Streisand's first musicals--

Funny Girl, Hello Dolly, and On a Clear Day You Can See Forever.

At Warner Brothers Stradling finally captured an Academy Award for his musical cinematography with My Fair Lady, previously he had won the Oscar for the MGM black and white The Picture of Dorian Gray.

Stradling was also responsible for the cinematography in the following musicals: Guys and Dolls, The Pajama Game, Gypsy and Hans Christian Andersen.

His versatility was unbelievable - - he served Hitchcock in two black and white films: Suspicion and Mr. And Mrs. Smith.

And despite his unbelievable Talent with the color musical Extravaganza, he led cinematographers in his approach to the Stark post war black-and-white dramas of the 1950s. He was responsible for cinematography in A Streetcar Named Desire, A Face in the Crowd, The Dark at the Top of the Stairs and Angel Face.

It's hard to believe that one cinematographer could be so diverse and versatile in his abilities.

My favorite Harry Stradling Technicolor cinematography is from a teen soap opera of the 1950s - - A Summer Place starring Sandra Dee and Troy Donahue. Even if you don't like that genre, you should just watch this movie to have your breath taken away by the ocean beach scenes.

Harry Stradling died in 1970, after completing his third Barbra Streisand Musical.

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https://mobile.nytimes.com/aponline/2017/10/27/arts/ap-us-obit-jack-bannon.html?referer=https://www.google.se/

Jack Bannon, who played the level-headed assistant editor opposite Ed Asner on Lou Grant from 1977 to 1982, has died. He was 77. 

Both of Bannon's parents were actors. His father was Jim Bannon, who appeared in many westerns on film, TV and radio from the '40s through the '60s. His mother was the actress Bea Benaderet, a staple of '60s television as the star of Petticoat Junction and the original voice of Betty Rubble on The Flintstones

From 1982 until his death Bannon was married to Ellen Travolta, the elder sister of John Travolta and a successful film and TV actress in her own right.

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