Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

946 posts in this topic

21 hours ago, jakeem said:

Tens of thousands of people said goodbye and "Merci, Johnny" to the French rocker Johnny Hallyday in Paris

Fans of the French rock star Johnny Hallyday gathered outside the Madeleine church in Paris on Saturday before a funeral procession.

 Last Saturday the funeral mass celebration for Johnny Hallyday was an unprecedented outpouring of grief from the French people.   Approximately a million people lined Paris streets to honor their rock and roll hero, thousands culminating in front of the Madeleine Church,  where the funeral was held in Paris, to pay their respects. Many had come in the cold early morning to be as close as possible to the church.

700 bikers accompanied Johnny's hearse, containing his white coffin, through the streets of Paris on up through to the Champs-Elysées to La Place de la Concorde, finally reaching La Madeleine.

The Vicar of the Diocese of Paris officiated Johnny's funeral.

 The funeral was televised  live on French National Television.

Sitting directly behind Johnny's white casket were the current President of France, Emmanuel Macron, along with his wife, Brigitte and his last two predecessors-- François Hollande and Nicolas Sarkozy, along with their respective partners. Also sittimg among the presidents were the Prime Minister of France and the President of the Senate.

( National Front leader Marine Le Pen was not present because Johnny's family made it clear to her that she would not be welcomed.)

President Macron delivered his eulogy to Johnny on the steps of the Madeleine in front of the tens of thousands of mourning French fans:

" Johnny Hallyday was a part of us, a part of France. We are here today for him....

He was much more than just a singer, his life was a part of France."

And Johnny is scheduled to be buried in the French Caribbean Island of St. Barts, where he maintained a palatial Villa.

Upon hearing that he would not be buried in Paris, many  fans were distraught and spoke of making plans to save money to visit his burial site on the island.

Johnny was 74 years- old when he died of lung cancer last Wednesday, after having previously beaten colon cancer. He was famous for his Gitanes, a popular French cigarette, which often hung from his mouth in photos.

Sources: The Daily Mail, The Local France

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Suzanna Leigh (July 26, 1945 - December 11, 2017) - British actress and god-daughter of Vivien Leigh. She appeared in a handful of films from the late 1960's through the early 1970's, including Paradise, Hawaiian Style (1966), The Lost Continent (1968), and Lust for a Vampire (1971). She amassed 27 film and TV credits in her brief career.

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Bruce Gray (September 7, 1936 - December 13, 2017) - Canadian actor of film and television. He made his debut in the late 1960's, and while he worked steadily from the 1970's on, he didn't achieve his greatest success until the late 1990's, co-starring on the TV series Traders. Other TV shows that he appeared in include Medium as the main character's ghostly father-in-law, Star Trek: EnterpriseQueer As FolkPlaymakers, and Falling Skies, while his film appearances included Let's Get Harry (1986), Dragnet (1987), Up Close & Personal (1996), Starship Troopers (1997), My Big Fat Greek Wedding (2002), and Recount (2008). In all, he accrued 172 film and television credits in a career spanning 50 years.

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Hiep Thi Le (November 30, 1971 - December 19, 2017) - Vietnamese-American actress who gained attention for starring in Oliver Stone's 1993 war film Heaven & Earth. The movie was released at the height of Stone's star-director status, and his casting of an unknown with no formal experience or training raised eyebrows. The actress proved more than capable, turning in a moving performance. Although she went on to appear in a handful of other films, none brought her much notice, and she retired from screen, opening up a couple of successful restaurants. She passed away after a battle with stomach cancer. 

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Donnelly Rhodes (December 4, 1937 - January 8, 2018) - Canadian actor in film and television with a career spanning 60 years. He appeared in a lot of TV shows in the 1960's, including episodes of MaverickMan with a CameraBonanzaWagon TrainThe Alfred Hitchcock HourThe Wild Wild WestMission: Impossible, and many more. His early film appearances included Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), although his main body of work continued to be in American television. He is perhaps best remembered for his role as Dutch on Soap (1978-1981). He had another good role on the Canadian police procedural Da Vinci's Inquest from 1998-2005. In all, he amassed more than 160 screen credits.

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In "Butch Cassidy," Rhodes played the card player who accused The Sundance Kid of cheating.

 

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Dave Toschi (July 11, 1931 - January 6, 2018) - Toschi was a detective with the San Francisco Police Department from 1952 through 1987. He's best known for presiding over the Zodiac killer case. He was also an inspiration for Steve McQueen's portrayal in the movie Bullitt, with McQueen using Toschi's dress style and other technical details. The screenwriters of Dirty Harry credited Toschi as a direct influence, as well. He was played by Mark Ruffalo in the 2007 film Zodiac.

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R.I.P. Greta Thyssen, age 90, 1927-2018

Excerpted from The Hollywood Reporter

Greta Thyssen, the Danish beauty who doubled for Marilyn Monroe, dated Cary Grant and starred opposite The Three Stooges, has died. She was 90.

Thyssen died Saturday, January 6, night at her Manhattan apartment after a bout with pneumonia, her daughter, Genevieve Guenther, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Thyssen starred in several "B" movies, including the horror pic Terror Is a Man (1959), a loose adaptation of H.G. Wells' The Island of Dr. Moreau. On a mystery island (it was filmed in the Philippines), the actress played the wife of a scientist (Francis Lederer) "tormented by unsatisfied desire, desperate to escape a loneliness and her fear," according to the film's trailer.

Unfortunately, Thyssen's character has more pressing issues to worry about, namely her husband's creation — a half-man, half-panther beast.

The movie incorporated a "warning bell" gimmick that would alert moviegoers when a particularly horrific sequence was about to take place so that they could hide their eyes. It would ring a second time when it was safe to look again.

Four of Thyssen's other best-known performances came in the Joseph Kane noir Accused of Murder (1956); The Beast of Budapest (1958); Three Blondes in His Life (1961), opposite Jock Mahoney; and as an enticing pin-up beauty on Uranus in Journey to the Seventh Planet (1962), shot in her native Denmark.

Thyssen was named Miss Denmark in the early 1950s. She soon left Europe, via Paris, for Hollywood.
 
With measurements of 39-24-36 or 40-21-35 — depending on which men's magazine one came across — Thyssen was just right as a body double for Monroe during the filming of the romantic comedy Bus Stop (1956).

She then was seen as the "Pirate Girl" on the first three seasons (1956-58) of the game show Treasure Hunt, created by host Jan Murray.

Thyssen appeared three times opposite Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Joe Besser in Three Stooges shorts. In Quiz Whizz (1958), she knocks out Moe and Larry with a baseball bat but gets her comeuppance with a large cake to the face.

In Pies and Guys (1958), she attempts to teach etiquette to the boys, only for a climatic dinner party to descend into chaos with a cream-pie fight.

Sappy Bull Fighters (1959) was the trio's final short film for Columbia Pictures. In it, Thyssen helps the trio land a gig in a Mexican bull ring, and not a single pie is thrown.

"I didn't quite understand that those kind of shorts would later be so admired and loved," she said in a 2010 interview. "I just was offered the job, because [the Stooges] wanted to start again. There was a new producer, and it was a new time. I think the original ones — weren't they in the thirties?"

Thyssen's movie career ended in 1967 after she decided to raise a family with her third husband, Theodore Guenther, a mining engineer. He died in 2000.

In retirement, she became as an artist in New York, painting representational nude figures against surrealistic allegory backgrounds, at the Art Students League.

In the early 1960s, Thyssen dated the charismatic Grant while he was experimenting with LSD as a way to find "inner peace." The drug was a tool of therapists and legal at the time.

"Apparently the romance ended when my mother gave an interview to Cosmopolitan magazine about what it was like to date Cary Grant. He was furious that she had shared that publicly," Guenther told THR. "All he enjoyed talking about was his experience with LSD. My mother was very straight and narrow; she wasn't interested in any of the counterculture of the sixties."

Thyssen also is survived by her son-in-law and grandchild.

With Thyssen's death, the number of surviving actors from The Three Stooges' classic series of Columbia 2-reelers dwindles to a precious few --- among them Diana Darrin, age 84, He Cooked His Goose (1952), Pardon My Backfire (1953), Musty Musketeers (1954), Shot in the Frontier (1954), Rumpus in the Harem (1956), A Merry Mix Up (1957), Outer Space Jitters (1957), Flying Saucer Daffy (1958), and Triple Crossed (1959) . . . . . . Nancy Saunders, age 92, Brideless Groom (1947), I'm a Monkey's Uncle (1948), and The Ghost Talks (1949) . . . . . . Julie Gibson, age 104, Three Smart Saps (1942) and Sock-A-Bye Baby (1942). 

 

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R.I.P. Jean Porter, perky 1940s MGM actress, age 95
 
Excerpted from The Hollywood Reporter
 
Jean Porter, a petite and vivacious supporting player in such 1940s MGM movies as Bathing Beauty, Abbott and Costello in Hollywood, and Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble, has died. She was 95. 
 
Porter died Saturday, Jan. 13, of natural causes in Canoga Park, California, her daughter Rebecca Dmytryk told The Hollywood Reporter.
 
Porter was married to writer-director Edward Dmytryk, one of the Hollywood Ten, from May 1948 — shortly after he had landed in trouble with the blacklist — until his death in 1999 at age 90.
 
The two met after Porter had replaced Shirley Temple in his film Till the End of Time (1946), and they also worked together on her final feature, The Left Hand of God (1955), starring Humphrey Bogart and Gene Tierney.
 
Born Bennie Jean Porter on Dec. 8, 1922, in Cisco, Texas, her Hollywood career began with small parts in such films as The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938), the sci-fi classic One Million B.C. (1940), Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941) and Hellzapoppin' (1941).
 
Porter appeared in such Westerns as Home in Wyomin' (1942) and Heart of the Rio Grande (1942) with Gene Autry and in San Fernando Valley (1944) opposite Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.
 
The perky 5-foot-tall, 98-pound Porter eventually was signed to a contract at MGM, and she played an autograph hound in The Youngest Profession (1943), which was laden with cameos made by the studio's top stars.
 
She was Lou Costello's manicurist girlfriend in Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (1945) and Margaret Dumont's daughter in Bathing Beauty (1944), starring Esther Williams and Basil Rathbone.
 
After leaving MGM, Porter signed with Columbia and had the lead in the "B" pictures Betty Co-Ed (1946) and the 1947 films Little Miss Broadway, Sweet Genevieve and Two Blondes and a Redhead. At RKO, she appeared as Richard Erdman's ill-fated love interest, Darlene, in the great Bunker Hill-set film noir Cry Danger (1951), starring Dick Powell.

 

Edward Dmytryk scored a best director Oscar nomination for Crossfire (1947) and helmed such notable films as Murder, My Sweet (1944), The Caine Mutiny (1954), Raintree County (1957), and The Carpetbaggers (1964).

 
MGM had loaned out Porter to RKO so she could step in for Temple in Till the End of Time. She had been dating singer Mel Torme when met Dmytryk.
 
Porter and her husband fled to England in the late 1940s after he was blacklisted as one of the Hollywood Ten for refusing to answer charges that he was a communist. They returned to the U.S. in 1951, and he served six months in prison for contempt of Congress.
 
Dmytryk then decided to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee. He admitted that he had been a member of the American Communist Party and named other members. That enabled him to resume his career in Hollywood.
 
While Porter was making Cry Danger, Dmytryk was in jail, she told the Western Clippings website in an undated interview. "Dick Powell, who was wonderful, gave me a part," she said. "[It was] very little, but at least I was working."
 
Her last onscreen appearances came in 1961 television episodes of Sea Hunt and 77 Sunset Strip.

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1 hour ago, Wayne said:
R.I.P. Jean Porter, perky 1940s MGM actress, age 95
 
Excerpted from The Hollywood Reporter
 
Jean Porter, a petite and vivacious supporting player in such 1940s MGM movies as Bathing Beauty, Abbott and Costello in Hollywood, and Andy Hardy's Blonde Trouble, has died. She was 95. 

Sorry to hear this. We had a discussion about Jean Porter awhile back. If you click on the arrow above my avatar in the post below, I think you will be taken to the discussion:

 

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I remember when she jitterbugged w/ Guy Madison in Till the End of Time.  Man, he was crazy to pick Dorothy McGuire over Jean!  Although I loved how Dorothy helped Guy calm the shell-shocked soldier at the skating rink.

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Terence Marsh (November 14, 1931 - January 9, 2018) - British production designer who earned a number of Oscar nominations and two wins over his near 50 year career. He was nominated for Scrooge (1970) and Mary Queen of Scots (1971), and he won for Oliver! (1968) and Dr. Zhivago (1965). Other credits include A Bridge Too Far (1977), The Hunt for Red October (1990), and The Shawshank Redemption (1994).

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19 hours ago, Wayne said:
 
While Porter was making Cry Danger, Dmytryk was in jail, she told the Western Clippings website in an undated interview. "Dick Powell, who was wonderful, gave me a part," she said. "[It was] very little, but at least I was working."

I never heard that story before, Dick Powell's way of repaying Dmytryk for Murder My Sweet,  I assume, by casting his wife in a small role at a time when employment would have been a challenge. Whatever the reason may have been, it was both kind and courageous of Powell to do so. What a class act.

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Bradford Dillman (April 14, 1930 - January 16, 2018)

Obituary from The Hollywood Reporter https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bradford-dillman-dead-actor-compulsion-way-we-were-was-87-1075818

Quote

Bradford Dillman, who starred with Dean Stockwell in the taut 1959 crime drama Compulsion and portrayed Edmund in the original Broadway production of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night, has died. He was 87.

Dillman died Tuesday in Santa Barbara due to complications from pneumonia, family spokesman Ted Gekis announced.

The lanky, dark-haired Dillman also played Robert Redford's best friend J.J. in The Way We Were (1973), and his daughter Pamela said that it was this movie that "perfectly captured the essence" of her father, particularly during the scene on a boat when the actors reminisce about their lives and best moments.

Dillman also appeared opposite Clint Eastwood in the Dirty Harry films The Enforcer (1976) and Sudden Impact (1983).

In director Richard Fleischer's Compulsion, derived from the infamous Leopold & Loeb case of the 1920s, Dillman and Stockwell starred as the brazen killers Arthur A. Straus and Judd Steiner, respectively, who think they have committed the perfect murder.

Dillman, Stockwell and Orson Welles (who played their attorney) shared best actor honors at the 1959 Cannes Film Festival. The Fox film was an adaptation of a Broadway hit, with Dillman taking on the role that Roddy McDowall had originated on the stage.

Dillman's family said that he was most proud of his work in Compulsion, along with his portrayal of Willie Oban in O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh (1973), an adaptation directed by John Frankenheimer for the American Film Theater.

Dillman had made his Broadway debut in 1956 in Long Day's Journey into Night, creating the role of the author's alter ego, Edmund Tyrone, for 390 performances and winning a Theater World Award in the process.

However, it was Stockwell who played Edmund in Sidney Lumet's 1962 movie version.

Dillman was born on April 14, 1930, in San Francisco, the third of the four children. He grew up in the city but spent his summers in Santa Barbara acting in local theater productions.

He attended boarding school at the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut and Yale University, where he studied English and drama, then entered the U.S. Marine Corps and served as a lieutenant in the Korean War.

After an honorable discharge, Dillman auditioned for Lee Strasburg and entered the Actors Studio alongside fellow classmates James Dean and Marilyn Monroe.

Following Long Day's Journey Into Night and a role in Katharine Cornell's Hallmark Hall of Fame production of Robert E. Sherwood's Pulitzer Prize-winning There Shall Be No Night, Dillman was signed by 20th Century Fox. He was cast in the 1958 films A Certain Smile and In Love and War and received the Golden Globe for most promising newcomer — male in 1959.

In 1961, Dillman had the title role in Francis of Assisi, directed by Michael Curtiz.

Omnipresent on television throughout the 1960s and '70s, Dillman had a recurring role on Dr. Kildare, starred with Peter Graves in the short-lived series Court Martial and guest-starred on shows including The Name of the Game; The Wild, Wild West; Mission: Impossible; The Man From U.N.C.L.E.; Columbo; Ironside; Barnaby Jones; and The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

His autobiography, Are You Anybody?: An Actor's Life, was published in 1997.

A lifelong fan of the San Francisco 49ers, Dillman was invited in the late '70s by coach Bill Walsh and owner Eddie DeBartolo to sit in on NFL Draft sessions, and he gave the team a suggested pick for the next 20 years. He wrote a book about another NFL team, Inside the New York Giants, in 1995.

Survivors include his children Jeffrey, Pamela, Charlie, Christopher and Dinah and stepdaughter Georgia. He was married to Frieda Harding McIntosh and, from 1963 until her death in 2003, model and actress Suzy Parker, whom he met in London while they made A Circle of Deception (1960).

The family asks that a donation in his memory be made to Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care in Santa Barbara.

 

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

Bradford Dillman (April 14, 1930 - January 16, 2018)

Obituary from The Hollywood Reporter https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bradford-dillman-dead-actor-compulsion-way-we-were-was-87-1075818

 

It's amazing that Dillman never appeared in an episode of "The Twilight Zone," although he worked on other projects connected to Rod Serling. Dillman's wife Suzy Parker played several characters in the episode "Number 12 Looks Just Like You" (pictured below with Pamela Austin and Richard Long).

Image result for suzy parker 'the twilight zone"

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Okay Callahan, what's up? I'm getting reports from Personnel

that you spend half your day talking to an empty chair.

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20 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Bradford Dillman (April 14, 1930 - January 16, 2018)

Obituary from The Hollywood Reporter https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bradford-dillman-dead-actor-compulsion-way-we-were-was-87-1075818

 

 I just saw Brad Dillman in A Certain Smile with Rossano Brazzi and Christine Carère.   I always loved the Johnny Mathis song,  but I had never seen the movie.  (Johnny Mathis actually sings the song as a nightclub singer, but does not sing it over the credits.)

And Joan Fontaine is also in this movie as Rossano Brazzi's wife.

I don't know why it took me so long, but I really enjoyed Brad Dillman"s performance. And after that I looked up a lot of information about him and Suzy Parker.  It was absolutely lovely that they were married for so many years.

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I'm sad to hear this.  Bradford Dillman was the perfect Francis of Assisi even though the real one was rather short instead of tall.  His performance was amazing and has stayed with me until this day. 

He could also be nasty.  I've never seen Compulsion but he did a Big Valley episode where he's a "Jeckel and Hyde" character who nails both sides of his character. 

I was glad to see that his daughter, Dinah, was still alive and well.  A fine writer, he told of her fight for life at age 5 after she was bitten in their yard by a rattler who'd come down from the hills during a heat wave.  He made you feel you were there with him.  It seems he was able to do the same for the sports arena.     

He was also a great director; if I saw he was doing the job I knew it would be worth my time.  He seems to have left a legacy in several fields of art but what would you expect from somebody smart enough to marry a redhead from Florida?  R.I.P., sir and thank you.    

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Ursula K. Le Guin (October 21, 1929 - January 22, 2018) - Writer Ursula K. Le Guin has died at the age of 88. One of the towering figures of the science fiction and fantasy genres for the past 50+ years, her contributions to the field include the Earthsea fantasy series and SF novels such as The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed. She was named a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress in 2000. She was also named a Grandmaster by both Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, as well as winning 4 Nebula and 2 Hugo awards.

While not much of her work has been translated onto TV or movie screens, there have been some, such as a TV version of Earthsea, as well as multiple versions of her story The Lathe of Heaven. Adaptations of her most famous novels have been rumored for decades. Her work has inspired countless others, though, in film, television and print, with her emphasis on environmentalism, gender issues, and political systems influencing many other works.

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Country singer Lari White has died. She had bits in a few movies as well. She had such a sweet voice.

 

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On 1/20/2018 at 4:33 PM, wouldbestar said:

I'm sad to hear this.  Bradford Dillman was the perfect Francis of Assisi even though the real one was rather short instead of tall.  His performance was amazing and has stayed with me until this day. 

He could also be nasty.  I've never seen Compulsion but he did a Big Valley episode where he's a "Jeckel and Hyde" character who nails both sides of his character. 

I was glad to see that his daughter, Dinah, was still alive and well.  A fine writer, he told of her fight for life at age 5 after she was bitten in their yard by a rattler who'd come down from the hills during a heat wave.  He made you feel you were there with him.  It seems he was able to do the same for the sports arena.     

He was also a great director; if I saw he was doing the job I knew it would be worth my time.  He seems to have left a legacy in several fields of art but what would you expect from somebody smart enough to marry a redhead from Florida?  R.I.P., sir and thank you.    

I'm sad also. I have always had a crush on Brad. He's in so many TV shows, Hitchcock Presents and I think Thriller. I have his autobio. I'll have to read it again. I recall he wasn't thrilled that he'd not become a major star.

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Jack Ketchum (November 10, 1946 - January 24, 2018) - Novelist and screenwriter Jack Ketchum has died at the age of 71. Writing primarily in the horror, suspense, and true crime genres, his best known novels are 1980's Off Season and 1989's The Girl Next Door, both of which were adapted as films, as were other novels such as Red and The Woman. He was named a Grand Master by the Horror Writers of America in 2011.

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John Morris (October 18, 1926 - January 25, 2018) - American film composer, most closely associated with the films of Mel Brooks. Among his better known film scores were those for 

  • The Producers (1968)
  • The Twelve Chairs (1970)
  • Young Frankenstein (1974)
  • Blazing Saddles (1974)
  • Silent Movie (1976)
  • High Anxiety (1977)
  • The In-Laws (1979)
  • The Elephant Man (1980)
  • History of the World, Part 1 (1981)
  • Yellowbeard (1983)
  • To Be or Not to Be (1983)
  • Clue (1985)
  • Spaceballs (1987)
  • Ironweed (1987)
  • Dirty Dancing (1987)

His score for The Elephant Man earned him an Oscar nomination.

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