[[Template core/front/global/tcmTabBar is throwing an error. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

711 posts in this topic

British actor Douglas Wilmer has died. A prolific performer on stage, television and film, he amassed nearly 100 credits in his 59 year screen career. He played Sherlock Holmes on British TV in 1973, and appeared in films such as Richard III (1955), El Cid (1961), Cleopatra (1963), The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), Khartoum (1966), Patton (1970), Cromwell (1970), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), and Octopussy (1983). He was 96.

 

18499-13986.gif

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my favourite Douglas Wilmer films was Jason and the Argonauts (1963).  Here is is pictured below as Pelias.

18499-9834_zpssy1zulqe.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don Francks

 

ZBIVtB3.jpg

 

Best known among movie buffs for Finian's Rainbow

 

  • Canadian actor and jazz vocalist Don Francks, a veteran of classic American cop and detective TV shows like Mission Impossible, Mannix and The Man From U.N.C.L.E., died Sunday after a battle with cancer. He was 84.
     
  • After leaving entertainment to live on the Red Pheasant Reserve in Saskatchewan as Iron Buffalo

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/don-francks-dead-actor-jazz-880428

 

I happened to look at his Wikipedia entry a few days ago. I got there from the page for guitarist Lenny Breau, whom Francks worked with in the early '60s.

 

Francks also played Archie Goodwin in a Nero Wolfe radio series for the CBC in 1982.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's strange. I was just thinking about him the other day (unsure why, maybe because Finian's Rainbow was on TCM recently).....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Merle Haggard RIP

 

EwzNyyH.jpg

 

A legend of County music, his legacy in film/TV is not vast, but he does have some acting credits on IMDb. His significant contribution predictably enough is musical: the theme for the TV series Moving On and inclusion on quite a few soundtracks.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/06/entertainment/merle-haggard-country-music-dies/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Merle Haggard RIP

 

EwzNyyH.jpg

 

A legend of County music, his legacy in film/TV is not vast, but he does have some acting credits on IMDb. His significant contribution predictably enough is musical: the theme for the TV series Moving On and inclusion on quite a few soundtracks.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/06/entertainment/merle-haggard-country-music-dies/

 

Just saw this on NBC4 news, yes he is a legend.  RIP.

 

Merle-Haggard.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/abel-fernandez-dead-untouchables-actor-891571

 

Abel Fernandez, who played Cherokee federal agent William Youngfellow on the ultra-violent 1960s ABC series The Untouchables, has died. He was 85.

 

Fernandez, who was a crowd-pleasing professional boxer in Los Angeles before he turned to acting, died Tuesday of lung cancer in a hospital in Whittier, Calif., his daughter Letty told The Hollywood Reporter.

 

Fernandez portrayed Youngfellow, one of the Prohibition agents working for Eliot Ness (Robert Stack), in more than 80 episodes of the 1930s, Chicago-set Untouchables. The gritty crime series, from Desilu Productions, aired for four seasons, from 1959-63.

 

The Youngfellow character was based on William Jennings Gardner, an American Indian member of the real-life Untouchables squad.

 

 

 

Robert Stack, Paul Picerni, Nicholas Georgiade, Steve London, Abel Fernandez. Everyone in this photo lived to be at least 80:

 

 

k4DRdUA.jpg

 

 

iz6mKqh.jpg

 

 

Abel Fernandez with Robert Michum

 

cc92w2A.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/abel-fernandez-dead-untouchables-actor-891571

 

 

 

Robert Stack, Paul Picerni, Nicholas Georgiade, Steve London, Abel Fernandez. Everyone in this photo lived to be at least 80:

 

 

k4DRdUA.jpg

 

 

iz6mKqh.jpg

 

 

cc92w2A.jpg

That's because they were The Untouchables.

 

Abel Hernandez was always the Untouchable who was on top of the telephone pole tapping the wires, so they could listen in on some gangsters ill-fated plans to take over the Capone Dynasty.

 

Thank you Richard Kimble for featuring the stars of my favorite TV show.

 

PS William Jennings Gardner was an All-American too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...

 

     I remember the first movie I saw Maggie Blye in:  THE ENTITY (1982). 

 

The Entity (1982) is a favorite of mine. I'll bet it's been 25, maybe 30 years since I've seen this one. 

 

It seems the poorer films get continual airplay while the better are secreted away, never to be seen again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this won't mean much to many of you.

 

But I read in this morning's paper that DON HUNT, who from 1960 to 1963 was local Detroit children's TV show host of---

 

"B'WANA DON From JUNGLE-LA".

 

Dressed in JUNGLE JIM styled garb, Mr. Hunt entertained kids and helped educate them about various animals worldwide.

 

In a casual conversation a few years ago with a veterinarian I took my dogs to, I discovered, according to HIM, "Hey," he said, "Remember that old TV show B'WANA DON?  You know, growing up watching that was the reason I wanted to become a vet!"

 

I wonder how many other veterinarians in this area became one for the same reason?

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read this morning that Madeleine Lebeau who played the 'Singer' in Casablanca (1942) passed away in Spain on May 1 at the age of 92.

Ms. Lebeau fled France with her husband Marcel Dalio in 1940 to Lisbon and then to Chile.  A real-life Casablanca refuge story.  She returned to her native France after the war.

I don't know if she was the last surviving cast member of Casablanca, or not.

*edit* I just noticed Emily Dean's Lebeau thread!

Edited by Bogie56
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I just read this morning that Madeleine Lebeau who played the 'Singer' in Casablanca (1942) passed away in Spain on May 1 at the age of 92.

Ms. Lebeau fled France with her husband Marcel Dalio in 1940 to Lisbon and then to Chile.  A real-life Casablanca refuge story.  She returned to her native France after the war.

I don't know if she was the last surfing cast member of Casablanca, or not.

*edit* I just noticed Emily Dean's Lebeau thread!

 

Actually Bogie, I understand Madeleine was strictly a hodad. Yep, and I think I read somewhere once that the last surviving Casablanca cast member to ever hang-ten off a surfboard was, believe it or not, Cuddles Sakall.

 

It was quite a sight, they say!

 

(...sorry...just couldn't resist) ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually Bogie, I understand Madeleine was strictly a hodad. Yep, and I think I read somewhere once that the last surviving Casablanca cast member to ever hang-ten off a surfboard was, believe it or not, Cuddles Sakall.

 

It was quite a sight, they say!

 

(...sorry...just couldn't resist) ;)

 

Ha.  This blasted mac anticipates the words you are trying to type on occasion and fills them in for you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

British film director JOHN KRISH died May 7 at 92.  He directed a movie I like that I've mentioned on here several times (MAN WHO HAD POWER OVER WOMEN, The (1970)) amongst numerous other film projects. 

 

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trio of deaths to report:

 

Morley Safer - TV journalist, and one of the last of the old-school hard news men, longtime fixture on CBS' 60 Minutes. He had recently announced his retirement, and 60 Minutes had only just aired his farewell episode this past Sunday night. He was 84.

 

morley-safer-sized.jpg

 

 

Alexandre Astruc - French film critic turned director, he helped shape the autuer theory. He was one of the leading voices in post-World War II French cinema, and his directorial efforts include The Crimson Curtain (1953) and End of Desire (1958). He was 92.

 

250611.1.jpg

 

 

Ian Watkin - New Zealand-born actor best known in the US for his role in Peter Jackson's 1993 horror comedy classic Braindead (aka Dead Alive) as the protagonist's boorish Uncle Les. He was 76.

 

braindead_04_stor.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trio of deaths to report:

 

Morley Safer - TV journalist, and one of the last of the old-school hard news men, longtime fixture on CBS' 60 Minutes. He had recently announced his retirement, and 60 Minutes had only just aired his farewell episode this past Sunday night. He was 84.

 

morley-safer-sized.jpg

Morley was a Toronto boy who worked at the CBC before moving to CBS.  R.I.P.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like the same thing happened with ANDY ROONEY several years ago from the "60 Minutes" cast; he retired and next thing you know he died.  

       

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like the same thing happened with ANDY ROONEY several years ago from the "60 Minutes" cast; he retired and next thing you know he died.  

 

Well HECK, Mr.G! When ya work well into your EIGHTIES, that usually doesn't give ya a whole lot of time to relax and go fishing before it's all over for ya, ya know?!! And the very reason I retired at 55...well, not to "go fishing" per se.

 

;)

 

(...sorry...and R.I.P. Morley)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy and Morley shouldn't have retired!  It proved to be the kiss of death!  (Actually, I thought Andy Rooney was past 90 when he retired . . . ). 

 

     But still . . . retired less than a week and now pushing up daisies. 

 

     Too bad neither Morley nor Andy could've enjoyed a little longer time of retirement. 

 

      

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy and Morley shouldn't have retired!  It proved to be the kiss of death!  (Actually, I thought Andy Rooney was past 90 when he retired . . . ). 

 

     But still . . . retired less than a week and now pushing up daisies. 

 

     Too bad neither Morley nor Andy could've enjoyed a little longer time of retirement. 

 

Yeah, I agree. Both gentlemen were still very vital well into their senior years.

 

(...'cept I always wished Andy would've trimmed those damn bushy things above those eyes of his) ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well HECK, Mr.G! When ya work well into your EIGHTIES, that usually doesn't give ya a whole lot of time to relax and go fishing before it's all over for ya, ya know?!! And the very reason I retired at 55...well, not to "go fishing" per se.

 

;)

 

(...sorry...and R.I.P. Morley)

Hey, Dargo Coburn, I retired early too at age 35 from being a gandy dancer.

 

What was your line of avarice...oops, I mean avocation or as they might say, work?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A gandy dancer, O CaveGirl?  Didst thou dance with geese?  (Or maybe that's a gander dancer . . . ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Dargo Coburn, I retired early too at age 35 from being a gandy dancer.

 

What was your line of avarice...oops, I mean avocation or as they might say, work?

 

Airline employee. Did just about every job function one can do at an airport(LAX, in my case) for various airlines, and because of various airline mergers over the years.

 

For the last dozen years or so, I worked as a boarding gate supervisor, making sure those big silver birds were "turned" as quickly and efficiently as possible. Airlines don't make money while their planes are sittin' at the gate, ya know.

 

And I retired at 55 with a little reduced pension because the airlines industry changed SO much after Congress passed the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978, and which has created the "thing" we call "air travel" today.

 

(...just an example...when I first started out in the early-'70s and as a young man and people would ask me what I do for a living, after I'd tell them I worked for an airline, they'd often reply with somethin' like, "Wow! How glamorous!"...and THEN fast forward into my middle-aged years and after the aforementioned congressional act took full effect upon the industry and creating the relatively cheap fares we have now days, after I'd reply to the SAME question, half the time I'd have somebody tryin' to tell me how bad their last flight on one of the airlines was and ask me why their legroom seems to be ever shrinking and all they got for an in-flight "meal" was a stinkin' little bag of peanuts or pretzels!) ;)

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another newsman also left us this week-end.   Investigative reporter and outdoors expert Terry Tomalin died of a heart attack at only 55.  He was more than Susan Sarandon's brother but well respected for his columns and civic endeavors.   

 

CBS news also just reported that Alan Young of Mr. Ed and The Time Machine died at age 97.  I also heard him sign in some 50's musicals; he was quite talented there as well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us