Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

946 posts in this topic

Alan Young, star of "Mister Ed" died yesterday at 96

Aside from Wilbur Post, I enjoyed him most as the voice of Scrooge McDuck in my favorite childhood cartoon, "Ducktales."

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Here's an interview Bill O'Reilly did with Young in June 2007 for "The O'Reilly Factor" on FOX News:

 

 

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I'll always remember Alan Young for his performances in George Pal's 1960 version of "The Time Machine." The British-born actor played a dual role: David Filby -- the best friend of the time traveler played by Rod Taylor -- and Filby's son James.

 

Young also appeared in DreamWorks Pictures' 2002 version of "The Time Machine," which starred Guy Pearce.

 

 

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About one day before the death of the person mentioned here named Alan Young (or the morning of this past Wednesday), I was thinking about him and another person who did voices for the original "DuckTales" TV series named June Foray and the possibility of the new "DuckTales" TV series having different persons play the characters they had portrayed for the original series due to the possibility of their deaths occurring by the time it's ready to be broadcast. This made me very concerned about whether he, the person named Alan Young, was still alive or not (I was even emotional enough to shed a tear in one of my eyes while it was closed since I was resting at the time); so concerned that I decided to check the page about him on the Internet Movie Database later that day (it had no details about whether he had died recently or not by then). Realizing that he would die later the next day made the news of it very surprising and strange to me.
 

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We were just talking about him at work the other day. I have Wilbur & Mr. Ed as my wallpaper on my PC and everybody that sees it, loves it and remembers the show.

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http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-36370997

 

Burt Kwouk, who was best known for playing Inspector Clouseau's manservant Cato in the Pink Panther films, has died aged 85.

 

He appeared in seven Pink Panther films opposite Peter Sellers as Clouseau's servant who regularly attacked his employer to keep him alert.

 

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http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-36370997

 

Burt Kwouk, who was best known for playing Inspector Clouseau's manservant Cato in the Pink Panther films, has died aged 85.

 

He appeared in seven Pink Panther films opposite Peter Sellers as Clouseau's servant who regularly attacked his employer to keep him alert.

 

 

He also appeared in three James Bond movies -- usually as a villain's assistant or collaborator. In "Goldfinger" (1964), Kwouk played Chinese agent Pan Ling, a key figure in the diabolical plot to debilitate Fort Knox. He also appeared in "You Only Live Twice" (1967) and the Bond spoof "Casino Royale" (1967).

 

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Kwouk and Gert Fröbe hatch a nefarious plan involving Fort Knox in "Goldfinger" (1964)

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Buck Kartalian has died at the age of 93. A short, stocky character actor, usually with a big grin, he appeared in all manner of film and television in a career that stretched from the 1950's to his final role in 2006. Some of his films included Mister Roberts, Morituri, Cool Hand Luke, Planet of the Apes, The Outlaw Josey Wales, and many more.

 

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He also appeared in three James Bond movies -- usually as a villain's assistant or collaborator. In "Goldfinger" (1964), Kwouk played Chinese agent Pan Ling, a key figure in the diabolical plot to debilitate Fort Knox. He also appeared in "You Only Live Twice" (1967) and the Bond spoof "Casino Royale" (1967).

 

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Kwouk and Gert Fröbe hatch a nefarious plan involving Fort Knox in "Goldfinger" (1964)

In "retirement" Burt took on the role of an appliance store owner in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine. That nonsensical Britcom where all the Great British comedic actors retire to. The only not so funny thing about it was that when you didn't see one for a while, you realized that he/she had gone into "permanent" retirement.

 

Burt's character, "Electrical Entwistle", was central because he was the one who had the vehicle, his appliance store truck, for all the senior citizens' escapades. Also, he was always trying to sell one of his appliances, but rarely getting any takers.

 

Last of the Summer Wine ended in 2010; it is the longest running comedy program in the UK and the longest running sitcom in the world.

 

Burt was awarded the OBE in 2011.

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Actress Rosanna Huffman was the widow of TV writer Richard Levinson, best-known as the co-creator of Columbo.

 

http://westernboothill.blogspot.com/2016/05/rip-rosanna-huffman.html

 

Richard and Rosanna Levinson

 

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Rosanna Levinson, nee Huffman, passed away on May 20, 2016 at her home in Santa Monica, CA. After a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, she decided not to seek treatment but instead to spend her final days at home with the family she loved, her cat Happy, and Turner Classic Movies. Even through her illness Rosanna kept her wicked sense of humor.

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Actress Rosanna Huffman was the widow of TV writer Richard Levinson, best-known as the co-creator of Columbo.

 

http://westernboothill.blogspot.com/2016/05/rip-rosanna-huffman.html

 

 

Huffman made several appearances as various characters on "Murder, She Wrote," another series co-created by Levinson, his longtime partner William Link and Peter S. Fischer.

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Actress Rosanna Huffman was the widow of TV writer Richard Levinson, best-known as the co-creator of Columbo.

 

http://westernboothill.blogspot.com/2016/05/rip-rosanna-huffman.html

 

Richard and Rosanna Levinson

 

OEOboMD.jpg

 

Rosanna Levinson, nee Huffman, passed away on May 20, 2016 at her home in Santa Monica, CA. After a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, she decided not to seek treatment but instead to spend her final days at home with the family she loved, her cat Happy, and Turner Classic Movies. Even through her illness Rosanna kept her wicked sense of humor.

I remember seeing Ms. Huffman in the episode of "Columbo" (she was in 2) where Ross Martin played an art critic who uses an art student (Ms. Huffman) as an accomplice in the murder of his uncle. May she Rest in Peace.

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Actress Theresa Saldana who played the commissioner's wife on '90s cop drama "The Commish" and was the victim in a highly-publicized stabbing has died ... TMZ has learned. 

 

Saldana had been hospitalized with an unknown illness and died Monday at Cedars-Sinai ... according to a member of her family. 

 

The actress made headlines in 1982 after being stabbed by a deranged fan outside her L.A. home. A delivery man who happened to be driving by saw her and came to her rescue, and she was able to survive the attack.

 

Saldana also famously starred alongside Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci in "Raging Bull." 

 

She stopped acting in 2004.

 

She was 61.

 

http://www.tmz.com/2016/06/07/theresa-saldana-dead/

 

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Yumi Shirakawa has died. She was a Japanese actress best known in the US for her roles in several science fiction films of the 1950's and 60's , such as Rodan (1956), The Mysterians (1957), The H-Man (1958) and Gorath (1962), as well as the epic samurai film Chushingura (1962). She was 79.

 

 

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Bud Spencer
 
The Italian actor and film maker Bud Spencer has died at the age of 86 in Rome.
 
Starring in a series of comedies and spaghetti westerns in the 1960 and 70s, Spencer became a household name.
 
Born Carlo Pedersoli in 1929 in Naples, Spencer was a professional swimmer in his youth and became the first Italian to swim 100 metres freestyle in less than a minute.
 
------
 
It wasn’t until the late 1960s that his acting career took off when he teamed up with Terence Hill in over 20 films, beginning with
God Forgives..I don’t
! The duo went on to make international hits such as
Ace High
in 1968 and
They Call Me Trinit
y in 1970.
 

 

 
 
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http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/scotty-moore-elvis-presley-guitarist-dead-at-84-20160628

 

Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley Guitarist, Dead at 84

 

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame guitarist performed on "Hound Dog," "Heartbreak Hotel," "Blue Suede Shoes" and dozens more Presley classics

 

Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley's longtime guitarist and a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, died Tuesday at his home in Nashville, the Commercial Appeal reports. No cause of death was provided, but Moore had been in poor health in recent months. He was 84. 

 

Born in Gadsden, Tennessee, Moore began playing guitar at the age of eight, and after a stint in the U.S. Navy in the early Fifties, moved to Memphis and formed the Starlite Wrangers with bassist Bill Black. In 1954, Sun Records impresario Sam Phillips paired Moore with a teenaged Elvis Presley. Together, along with Black, they would record Presley's first single, "That's All Right (Mama)." The recording session was only meant to be an audition; instead, the trio made music history.

 

Bassist Bill Black, drummer D.J. Fontana, Judy Tyler, composer Mike Stoller ("Hound Dog", "Jailhouse Rock") on piano, guitarist Scotty Moore, and Elvis Presley in Jailhouse Rock:

 

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Backing up Elvis in the classic "(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care" number from Jailhouse Rock:

 

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Richard Linke, the talent manager who helped transform Andy Griffith from a high school music teacher into an exemplar of folksy American small-town values on one of the most successful television shows of the convulsive 1960s, died on Wednesday at his home on the island of Hawaii. He was 98.
 
Mr. Linke all but discovered Mr. Griffith. He gave him entree to Broadway and Hollywood and collaborated with the producer Sheldon Leonard to create “The Andy Griffith Show,” which stamped Mr. Griffith indelibly as Andy Taylor, the judicious, widowed sheriff who dispensed commonsensical wisdom in the fictional town of Mayberry, N.C.
 
Mr. Linke helped make Mr. Griffith’s “’preciate it” a household phrase. He later did the same with the elongated “Goll-ly!” of another client, Jim Nabors, a lounge singer with a booming baritone who was introduced to a national audience on Mr. Griffith’s show in the role of the bumpkin Gomer Pyle.
 
“The Andy Griffith Show” and later “Matlock,” on which Mr. Griffith starred as a homespun but deceptively savvy defense lawyer, were network television staples for 17 years.
 
Long before he became a television personality, Mr. Griffith, transplanted from North Carolina to New York, had breakout roles on Broadway, in “No Time for Sergeants” in 1955, and in film, in “A Face in the Crowd,” in 1957. In that movie, written by Budd Schulberg and directed by Elia Kazan, he played Lonesome Rhodes, a hillbilly singer who metamorphoses into a megalomaniacal television personality.
 
=====
 
Mr. Griffith credited Mr. Linke with launching and sustaining a show business career that otherwise might never have gotten gone beyond regional radio.
 
“He led me to agents, he personally took me to auditions,” Mr. Griffith told The New York Times Magazine in 1970. “If there is ever a question about something, I will do what he wants me to do; had it not been for him, I would have gone down the toilet.”
 
Mr. Linke was handling publicity at Capitol Records in 1953 when he became captivated by “What It Was, Was Football,” a recorded comedy routine on which Mr. Griffith narrated a football game from the perspective of a flummoxed first-time spectator. Mr. Linke heard it late one night when, through a crystal-clear sky, his radio picked up the signal of a distant station in the South.
 
Mr. Linke and Hal Cook of Capitol, who had received a copy of the record separately, flew to North Carolina. They bought the rights to the record for the label for $10,000 and negotiated a contract with Mr. Griffith that called for him to receive $300 a week.
 
Mr. Linke signed on as Mr. Griffith’s personal manager while still working for Capitol and eventually became his business partner.
 
He introduced Mr. Griffith to Abe Lastfogel at the William Morris Agency, who booked him on Ed Sullivan’s television variety show, “Toast of the Town,” following a trained camel act — hardly the ideal lead-in.
 
Mr. Griffith survived his debut, and his career soared, especially when Mr. Leonard cast him as Sheriff Taylor and named the show after him. (Mr. Linke was associate producer at the time.) “The Andy Griffith Show” also featured the comic actor Don Knotts as Mr. Griffith’s neurotic deputy, Barney Fife; Ron Howard as his son, Opie; Frances Bavier as his maiden Aunt Bee; and Mr. Nabors as Gomer, the goofball gas station attendant.
 
=====
 
Mr. Linke once told an advertising salesman from Lever Brothers that his clients were like any other merchandise.
 
“Listen, my business is just like yours,” he recalled explaining in an interview with The New York Times. “A client is like a product: You wrap your package up, merchandise it, and hope it moves off the shelves. Fast.”
 
How fast? “A shortcut to success, that’s what I can give an artist,” he said. “I can save him five, seven years. The big guys at CBS or the William Morris Agency are not gonna hotfoot it out to the Horn in Santa Monica where some unknown guy talks like a hillbilly and sings ‘Pagliacci.’ That’s where I come in. I open all the doors, and that’s what I did with Jim Nabors.”
 
After a while, Hollywood’s heavy hitters were holding doors for him. “I like to be important,” he acknowledged. “I don’t want people, when they hear my name, to say, ‘Who is Dick Linke?’”
 
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Robin Hardy (1929-2016) has died. He directed the cult horror film The Wicker Man in 1973. His output afterwards was meager; only two more films, 1986's The Fantasist and the long-awaited sequel to his first film, The Wicker Tree in 2011. However, his direction of the The Wicker Man ensures his legacy. 

 

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Michael Cimino - Oscar-winning writer and director, most notably of 1978's The Deer Hunter and the infamous fiasco Heaven's Gate in 1981. After writing the screenplay for the Clint Eastwood film Thunderbolt & Lightfoot in 1974, Cimino scored big with The Deer Hunter, which allowed him a virtual blank check for Heaven's Gate, much to the future misery of United Artists. Cimino directed several more films, including 1985's Year of the Dragon and the 1990 remake of Desperate Hours.

 

Michael Cimino was believed to be 77, but there is varying info regarding the year of his birth.

 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/stuart-nisbet-dead-character-actor-907629

 

Stuart Nisbet, the character actor with the very familiar face who seemingly appeared on every television series from Dennis the Menace to The Practice, has died. He was 82.

 

Nisbet, who has an astronomic 172 acting credits listed on IMDb, died June 23 at USC Verdugo Hills Hospital in Glendale, Calif., his wife, Nancy, told The Hollywood Reporter.

 

Nisbet played the bartender Bart on the 1960s NBC series The Virginian and also doled out drinks on such shows as Route 66, Two Faces West, Hogan's Heroes, The Monkees and The Rockford Files.

 

In the first season of ABC's Happy Days, he was the principal who allowed the Fonz (Henry Winkler) to return (albeit briefly) to high school.

 

Nisbet showed up as a member of the Southern town mayor's council in the Oscar best picture winner In the Heat of the Night (1967), was a veterinarian in The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989) and portrayed a banker in Martin Scorsese's Casino (1995).

 

If you look closely, he can be spotted in the "One word: plastics" scene in The Graduate (1967), and his film résumé includes The Quick and the Dead (1963), Games (1967), Angel in My Pocket (1969), Slither (1973) and Hearts of the West (1975).

 

 

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Trivia: can anyone tell me the defendant that eyewitness Stuart is identifying in this scene?

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/stuart-nisbet-dead-character-actor-907629

 

Stuart Nisbet, the character actor with the very familiar face who seemingly appeared on every television series from Dennis the Menace to The Practice, has died. He was 82.....

 

 

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Trivia: can anyone tell me the defendant that eyewitness Stuart is identifying in this scene?

 

Would it perhaps be you, Doc?

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Would it perhaps be you, Doc?

 

Very close -- it's from one of my favorite Get Smart episodes, "Don't Look Back", a parody of The Fugitive.

 

Maxwell Smart, wrongfully convicted of murder, is driven to the death house by a skeptical police lieutenant (Bruce Gordon):

 

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Very close -- it's from one of my favorite Get Smart episodes, "Don't Look Back", a parody of The Fugitive.

 

Maxwell Smart, wrongfully convicted of murder, is driven to the death house by a skeptical police lieutenant (Bruce Gordon):

 

 

Funny Doc, but as big a fan of both The Fugitive and Get Smart that I am, I don't remember this particular parody in the sitcom.

 

However, seeing as how the exploits of Agent 86 are currently being rerun on MeTV Sunday nights, I will probably run across it in short order.

 

(...btw, and fwiw...my favorite Get Smart parody episode featured Don Adams doing his Ronald Colman impression in this sitcom's send-up of THE PRISONER OF ZENDA)

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