Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

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Funny Doc, but as big a fan of both The Fugitive and Get Smart that I am, I don't remember this particular parody in the sitcom.

 

However, seeing as how the exploits of Agent 86 are currently being rerun on MeTV Sunday nights, I will probably run across it in short order.

 

(...btw, and fwiw...my favorite Get Smart parody episode featured Don Adams doing his Ronald Colman impression in this sitcom's send-up of THE PRISONER OF ZENDA)

 

IIRC Adams did the Colman bit twice: first in an episode titled "The King Lives?", then again in the two-parter "To Sire, With Love", which features the credit "and Rupert of Rathskeller as himself" -- guest villain James Caan agreed to appear on condition his name not be used.

 

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John McMartin

 

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John McMartin, leading man in stage musicals and plays from 1959 to 2011, including the original productions of Follies and Sweet Charity, has died of cancer at age 86, according to a death notice in The New York Times.

With 24 Broadway credits to his name, McMartin was nominated for the Tony Award five times, and was inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame in 2009. He was most recently seen on Broadway in the 2014 political drama All The Way. The tireless stage veteran was always a welcomed sight to regular theatregoers and the general public as well, playing roles in Grey Gardens, High Society, Anything Goes and the Narrator in the 2002 Broadway revival of Into the Woods.

His screen work spanned numerous genres, including the new Netflix series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, as well as All The President's Men, Frasier, Kinsey, Cheers and a recurring role on Falcon Crest. McMartin also appeared in the Bob Fosse-directed film of Sweet Charity.

His name will forever be linked to the landmark 1971 Stephen Sondheim-James Goldman-Harold Prince musical Follies, in which he created the role of the unhappily married Benjamin Stone. He was 41 when he created the role.

McMartin takes with him a piece of seminal Broadway history. He was the last surviving principal cast member from the original Follies, in which he co-starred opposite Alexis Smith, Dorothy Collins and Gene Nelson.

John McMartin was born November 18, 1929, in Warsaw, IN.

http://www.playbill.com/article/follies-star-john-mcmartin-dead-at-86

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John McMartin

 

058RPFc.jpg

 

John McMartin, leading man in stage musicals and plays from 1959 to 2011, including the original productions of Follies and Sweet Charity, has died of cancer at age 86, according to a death notice in The New York Times.

 

With 24 Broadway credits to his name, McMartin was nominated for the Tony Award five times, and was inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame in 2009. He was most recently seen on Broadway in the 2014 political drama All The Way. The tireless stage veteran was always a welcomed sight to regular theatregoers and the general public as well, playing roles in Grey Gardens, High Society, Anything Goes and the Narrator in the 2002 Broadway revival of Into the Woods.

 

His screen work spanned numerous genres, including the new Netflix series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, as well as All The President's Men, Frasier, Kinsey, Cheers and a recurring role on Falcon Crest. McMartin also appeared in the Bob Fosse-directed film of Sweet Charity.

 

His name will forever be linked to the landmark 1971 Stephen Sondheim-James Goldman-Harold Prince musical Follies, in which he created the role of the unhappily married Benjamin Stone. He was 41 when he created the role.

 

McMartin takes with him a piece of seminal Broadway history. He was the last surviving principal cast member from the original Follies, in which he co-starred opposite Alexis Smith, Dorothy Collins and Gene Nelson.

 

John McMartin was born November 18, 1929, in Warsaw, IN.

 

http://www.playbill.com/article/follies-star-john-mcmartin-dead-at-86

Ah, so sad!

 

I liked him so much when he played the priest on "Golden Girls" that Dorothy wanted to date, since he was not wearing his clerical collar. A really fine actor that will be missed, even though till now I had not known his name.

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So sorry to hear about John McMartin. A shame the Follies recording was such a botch.

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Wow! "All the President's Men" is on TCM tonight, and one of my favorite scenes features McMartin as a foreign editor of The Washington Post. During an afternoon budget meeting -- when editors decide which stories will go where in the newspaper -- McMartin's character expresses doubts about The Post's Watergate coverage.

 

"Why would the Republicans do it?” he asks the other editors about the Nixon administration's possible involvement in the 1972 Watergate break in and subsequent cover-up. “I don't believe this story. It doesn’t make sense.” 

 

The character was totally wrong, but it's a nice moment, anyway.

 

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McMartin

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Wow! "All the President's Men" is on TCM tonight, and one of my favorite scenes features McMartin as a foreign editor of The Washington Post. During an afternoon news conference -- when editors decide which stories will go where in the newspaper -- McMartin's character expresses doubts about The Post's Watergate coverage.

 

"Why would the Republicans do it?” he asks the other editors about the Nixon administration's possible involvement in the 1972 Watergate break in and subsequent cover-up. “I don't believe this story. It doesn’t make sense.”

 

The character was totally wrong, but it's a nice moment, anyway.

 

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McMartin

 

Whaddaya mean, "he was wrong", jakeem???

 

Considering the 1972 Presidential election was the biggest landslide election ever and in the Republican candidate's favor(not to mention that during the break-in, ol' Tricky Dick was leading in the polls by 20-some points), ya gotta AT LEAST admit McMartin's character was right when he says "it doesn't make sense", RIGHT?!!!

 

;)

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Whaddaya mean, "he was wrong", jakeem???

 

Considering the 1972 Presidential election was the biggest landslide election ever and in the Republican candidate's favor(not to mention that during the break-in, ol' Tricky Dick was leading in the polls by 20-some points), ya gotta AT LEAST admit McMartin's character was right when he says "it doesn't make sense", RIGHT?!!!

 

;)

Uh, maybe Nixon thought they were storing some sable or mink fur coats at the Watergate, and sent CREEP out to pick up a few cheap for Pat Nixon since by then she was over wearing the respectable "cloth coat" that Richard talked about amongst stories about Checkers the pup and other items that were considered acceptable for Republican women to own, Dargo?

 

Just a thought...

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Whaddaya mean, "he was wrong", jakeem???

 

Considering the 1972 Presidential election was the biggest landslide election ever and in the Republican candidate's favor(not to mention that during the break-in, ol' Tricky Dick was leading in the polls by 20-some points), ya gotta AT LEAST admit McMartin's character was right when he says "it doesn't make sense", RIGHT?!!!

 

;)

 

Well, with Tricky Dick, it made sense!

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Whaddaya mean, "he was wrong", jakeem???

 

Considering the 1972 Presidential election was the biggest landslide election ever and in the Republican candidate's favor(not to mention that during the break-in, ol' Tricky Dick was leading in the polls by 20-some points), ya gotta AT LEAST admit McMartin's character was right when he says "it doesn't make sense", RIGHT?!!!

 

;)

 

Well, maybe I shouldn't have written that he was "totally wrong"!  Then again, I left out the opening line in which he asks, "Where did the Washington Post suddenly get the monopoly on wisdom?"

 

To the best of my recollection (as White House aides said over and over during the Watergate hearings), Woodward and Bernstein only screwed up once. They made an assumption about grand jury testimony that was incorrect. That's a nice batting average for a couple of young but wise Post reporters working on the political story of the 20th century!   :ph34r:

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Ah, so sad!

 

I liked him so much when he played the priest on "Golden Girls" that Dorothy wanted to date, since he was not wearing his clerical collar. A really fine actor that will be missed, even though till now I had not known his name.

Interestingly, John McMartin also played a priest in "The Bob Newhart Show" (in it, Bob thinks he wants to leave the priesthood because of something he said).

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I liked John McMartin's appearance in an episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." In his episode, he plays a lawyer friend of Lou Grant's. Mary is on trial for refusing to name her source in a corruption case. Lou convinces Mary to hire McMartin to represent her in the case. In the weeks leading up to the trial, McMartin takes a shine to Mary. Mary does not feel the same about him and tells him, the night before the trial. The next day, McMartin shows up to the courtroom, drunk.

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I somehow missed this one when it was reported a couple of weeks ago. Michael Herr, the war correspondent and author turned Oscar-nominated screenwriter, died on June 23, 2016 at the age of 76. He is remembered for "Dispatches," his 1977 novel about the Vietnam War.

 

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Herr (1940-2016)

 

He also wrote some of Martin Sheen's voiceovers for Francis Ford Coppola's Vietnam epic "Apocalypse Now." He shared a 1987 Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay with Stanley Kubrick and Gustav Hasford for "Full Metal Jacket." The Vietnam War satire was based on Hasford's 1979 novel "The Short-Timers."

 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/books/2016/06/25/vietnam-war-journalist-dispatches-author-michael-herr-dies-at-76/86374376/

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I would recommend Michael Herr's book, Kubrick (2000) to any Stanley fans.  It is certainly better than Frederic Raphael's book on Eyes Wide Shut.

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http://www.wpxi.com/news/bill-cardille-channel-11-icon-and-host-of-chiller-theater-has-died/408523707

 

 

Bill Cardille, Channel 11 icon and host of 'Chiller Theater', has died

 

This is a very sad day for Pittsburgers everywhere, especially for those of us who were introduced to horror movies through Chiller Theater.  His "Chilly Billy" persona was the inspiration for SCTV's Count Floyd, played by native Pittsburger, Joe Flaherty.

 

Appearing as himself in the original The Night of the Living Dead (1968) made the movie even scarier, as it brought a touch of reality to what might otherwise have been an ordinary horror film.

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http://www.wpxi.com/news/bill-cardille-channel-11-icon-and-host-of-chiller-theater-has-died/408523707

 

 

Bill Cardille, Channel 11 icon and host of 'Chiller Theater', has died

 

This is a very sad day for Pittsburgers everywhere, especially for those of us who were introduced to horror movies through Chiller Theater.  His "Chilly Billy" persona was the inspiration for SCTV's Count Floyd, played by native Pittsburger, Joe Flaherty.

 

Appearing as himself in the original The Night of the Living Dead (1968) made the movie even scarier, as it brought a touch of reality to what might otherwise have been an ordinary horror film.

 

Thanks for posting this, Belle. I thought of posting it myself, but wasn't sure if there would be any interest around here. I liked all of those old TV horror hosts, and his appearance in Night of the Living Dead makes him a stand-out among them. His daughter went on to star in the sequel Day of the Dead in 1985.

 

RIP Chilly Billy

HorrorHost-photo-21.jpg

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Thanks for posting this, Belle. I thought of posting it myself, but wasn't sure if there would be any interest around here. I liked all of those old TV horror hosts, and his appearance in Night of the Living Dead makes him a stand-out among them. His daughter went on to star in the sequel Day of the Dead in 1985.

 

RIP Chilly Billy

HorrorHost-photo-21.jpg

 

Thanks for posting the photo as well as the info about his daughter, Lawrence.  Sadly, there aren't many old horror hosts left.

 

Here's another nice remembrance from the people at Monster Bash, an annual celebration of horror/monsters/sci-fi (which he attended regularly until this July).  It's easy to understand why he's so beloved and will be dearly missed.

 

http://www.monsterbashnews.com/

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Here in Florida we had Nick Bennick, aka "Dr. Paul Bearer" broadcasting weekly from his "tenement castle".  His gimmick was taking popular brand products and relabeling them with parodies including words associated with this kind of movie.  Off camera, he was a frequent and much loved guest at charity events.  When he died of cancer I missed his humor more than the movies. 

 

Swengouli is close but not him.  Anybody else remember their monster movie hosts? 

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Here in Florida we had Nick Bennick, aka "Dr. Paul Bearer" broadcasting weekly from his "tenement castle".  His gimmick was taking popular brand products and relabeling them with parodies including words associated with this kind of movie.  Off camera, he was a frequent and much loved guest at charity events.  When he died of cancer I missed his humor more than the movies. 

 

Swengouli is close but not him.  Anybody else remember their monster movie hosts? 

 

Big Chuck and Little John (still very much alive) have been a fixture in Cleveland for many years.  Hosting movies on local TV with skits, as well as making public appearances around town.  Earlier on they used to have a lot of fun with monster movies, then later on they had to do more mainstream movies.  Here they are in white teeshirts.  Before them we had Ernie "Ghoulardi" Anderson.

 

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Here in Florida we had Nick Bennick, aka "Dr. Paul Bearer" broadcasting weekly from his "tenement castle".  His gimmick was taking popular brand products and relabeling them with parodies including words associated with this kind of movie.  Off camera, he was a frequent and much loved guest at charity events.  When he died of cancer I missed his humor more than the movies. 

 

Swengouli is close but not him.  Anybody else remember their monster movie hosts?

 

Uh-huh, wouldbestar. In L.A. back in the late-'60s we had a rather gaunt-of-face fellow named Larry Vincent who'd present these movies sporting a black cape and as a character named "Seymour".

 

(...he unexpectedly died at only the age of 50 of cancer in 1974 and was soon replaced by Cassandra Peterson, who would go on to become more nationally known as "Elvira")

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Uh-huh, wouldbestar. In L.A. back in the late-'60s we had a rather gaunt-of-face fellow named Larry Vincent who'd present these movies sporting a black cape and as a character named "Seymour".

 

(...he unexpectedly died at only the age of 50 of cancer in 1974 and was soon replaced by Cassandra Peterson, who would go on to become more nationally known as "Elvira")

 

Larry "Seymour" Vincent

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Cassandra "Elvira" Peterson

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http://www.newsfromme.com/

 

Jack Davis

 

One of America's all-time great cartoonists has left us at the age of 91. Jack Davis made his initial fame in EC Comics like Tales from the Crypt and MAD but went on to become one of the most visible (and imitated) creators of advertising, movie posters and record album covers ever. His ability to make anything funnier when he drew it and his keen eye for caricatures could be seen darn near everywhere in this country for well more than half a century.

Jack Davis was born in Atlanta, Georgia on December 2, 1924. His first drawing in print was a small sketch that ran in Tip Top Comics in the thirties. It was on a page that printed reader contributions and he was not the only soon-to-be-famous cartoonist who first saw a drawing of his published there. So did Mort (Beetle Bailey) Walker and Davis's soon-to-be collaborator/employer, Harvey Kurtzman.

Davis attended the University of Georgia and his work on the campus newspaper (and an independent humor publication) got him an intern job at the Atlanta Journal which in turn led to assistant work on the newspaper strip, Mark Trail and later on The Saint.

In 1950, he hooked up with EC Comics and became one of the firm's most popular artists on its popular line of horror, crime, war and humor comics. Davis could do any of those but it was the funny stuff he did for MAD that really set him apart from the pack. When MAD's first editor Harvey Kurtzman left, Davis followed him to other humor periodicals (all short-lived) but returned to MAD in the mid-sixties. By then, he also had a steady flow of work for movie posters, record album covers, magazine covers (including Time) and other commercial venues.

 

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David Huddleston

 

The LA Times may think of him as Lebowski, but he'll always be Olson Johnson to me.

 

"Now who can argue with that? Not only was it authentic frontier gibberish..."

 

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"We fought rustlers, fought Indians, Fought Dix -- you remember when Richard Dix tried to take over the town?"

 

http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-david-huddleston-20160804-snap-story.html

 

David Huddleston, who played the title role in 'The Big Lebowski,' dies at 85

David Huddleston, a character actor who already had a vast list of credits to his name when — late in his career -- he took what was to become his most famous role as the title character in “The Big Lebowski,” has died, said his wife, Sarah Koeppe. He was 85.

Koeppe, his wife and partner of 32 years, said he died of advanced heart and kidney disease Tuesday in Santa Fe, N.M.

 

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Thank you, Mr. Kimble, for the write-up on Huddleston. I saw he had died earlier this evening, and was hoping you'd do a mention of him. I liked him in Blazing Saddles as well.

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Her R.I.P. photo just appeared on the *Candids 2" thread.  She died on July 16th in Houston, TX. 

 

Lisa Gaye, Actress and Dancer in 'Rock Around the Clock,' Dies at 81

The sister of 'Love Me Tender' star Debra Paget, she also stood out in 'Shake Rattle & Rock!'

 

Lisa Gaye, the auburn-haired actress and dancer who starred in the 1956 musical films Rock Around the Clock and Shake Rattle & Rock!, died Thursday in Houston, her family announced. She was 81.

 

Survivors include her sister Debra Paget, who starred in such films as Broken Arrow, Love Me Tender and The Ten Commandments, and brother Frank Griffin, a Hollywood makeup artist who earlier acted under the screen name Reull Shayne. Another sister, actress Teala Loring, died in 2007.

 

In the box-office sensation Rock Around the Clock, featuring Bill Haley and the Comets, The Platters and others, Gaye was memorable dancing with Earl Barton (also the film's choreographer) in front of a clapping crowd of teens in the show-stopping number "Rock-A-Beatin Boogie."

 

In Shake Rattle & Rock! Gaye played the love interest of a disc jockey (Mike Connors) in the story about adults who want to ban rock 'n' roll because they think it leads to juvenile delinquency.

 

Also in the 1950s, Gaye had a recurring role as French model Collette DuBois on The Bob Cummings Show and was one of three women chasing rich guys on the TV version of How to Marry a Millionaire, also starring Barbara Eden.

 

The green-eyed Gaye guest-starred quite often on TV, appearing on such shows as Death Valley Days, Whirlybirds, Sea Hunt, Have Gun — Will Travel, 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye, Get Smart, I Dream of Jeannie, Wagon Train, Perry Mason, Wild Wild West, The Flying Nun and, in her last onscreen appearance in 1970, Mod Squad.

 

Leslie Gaye Griffin was born March 6, 1935, in Denver. Her mother was an actress, and her family moved to Los Angeles after her sister Teala was signed to a contract by Paramount. Later, Debra was scooped up by 20th Century Fox. (Her mother gave each of her children a stage name.)

 

At the recommendation of Debra, she was screen-tested at Universal International and signed there in 1953. The studio changed her name to Lisa Gaye, and in 1954, she showed up as a bobbysoxer in The Glenn Miller Story, as a harem girl in Rhonda Fleming's Yankee Pasha and as Audie Murphy's fiancee in Drums Across the River.

 

Gaye also appeared opposite Dean Martin in Ten Thousand Bedrooms (1957), and in Night of Evil (1961), she portrayed a raped student who goes on to win a beauty pageant but ends up on skid row.

 

Survivors also include her daughter Janell.

 

While Debra had a more varied career because of her movie and television work Lisa was a "queen of 50's TV" and therefore more known by me.  She must have lived on the Perry Mason set as she did so many of those episodes.  Also unlike Debra she found personal happiness having a long marriage until his death. 

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Jack Riley, a regular actor on “The Bob Newhart Show” and the voice of Stu Pickles on the popular animated show “Rugrats,” has died. He was 80. 

 

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He died of pneumonia at a hospital in Los Angeles and is survived by his wife Ginger Lawrence, two children and two grandchildren, according to Paul Doherty at Cunningham Escott Slevin & Doherty.  Riley gained recognition for his role as the selfish and neurotic patient Elliot Carlin, who is credited in 49 episodes of “The Bob Newhart Show.”

 

Riley’s career spanned close to 50 years and he has amassed 157 credits over that duration. He was also a regular in “Diff’rent Strokes,” “Night Court” and “Son of the Beach.”

 

In addition to his career on television, Riley was a part of several Mel Brooks films including “Silent Movie,” “High Anxiety,” “History of the World: Part I” and “Spaceballs.”

 

http://variety.com/2016/tv/news/jack-riley-dead-bob-newhart-show-rugrats-dies-1201841172/

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