Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

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"Mr. Carlin," was one of my favorite characters on, "The Bob Newhart Show."  His dry delivery made all of his lines funny. Always afterward I loved spotting him in other shows, just the other day I saw him in a "MASH," episode. playing cards.

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Steven Hill, respected actor of stage and screen, has died at the age of 94. One of the original members of the Actor's Studio, he appeared in several theater productions to much acclaim. Lee Strasberg once referred to Hill as "one of the finest actors America has ever produced." He appeared in a few films, but found his greatest recognition on television, first as the original star of Mission: Impossible, and much later as District Attorney Adam Schiff for 10 seasons on Law & Order.

 

 

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Hill was only on "Mission: Impossible" during its first season -- 1966-67. He played Dan Briggs, chief of the Impossible Missions Force (IMF). When he left after Season 1, he was succeeded by Peter Graves as Jim Phelps.

 

Notice that future Oscar winner Martin Landau -- who played master of disguise Rollin Hand -- wasn't listed in the opening credits for Season 1 of the series. He received featured-player billing after the opening commercials because he didn't want to commit to a TV show full time. But things changed and he was elevated to series regular.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1bkfBgUS20

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I just watched Running on Empty a couple of weekends ago, in which Hill played the father of Christine Lahti's character. He only had the one scene, but he sure made the most of it.

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I just watched Running on Empty a couple of weekends ago, in which Hill played the father of Christine Lahti's character. He only had the one scene, but he sure made the most of it.

 

Yep, I was just about to mention this very thing, Fedya. Yes, Hill's scene in that restaurant opposite Christine Lahti was very memorable and showed well his acting abilities.

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Marvin Kaplan, a character actor known for the sitcom “Alice” and his voice-over work as Choo-Choo on the animated series “Top Cat,” has died. He was 89. 

 

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He died of natural causes on Wednesday in his home in Burbank, Calif., according to a statement released by Theatre West.  “It is with a sad and heavy heart to inform you our very own Marvin Kaplan passed away today at 5 a.m. in his sleep,” the statement reads. “We loved Marvin. He will truly be missed.” 

 

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Kaplan’s made his film debut in 1949’s “Adam’s Rib” starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. Known for his sarcastic and deadpan delivery, Kaplan was featured in a variety of films, TV shows and animated series throughout his 60+ year career. 

 

Apart from “Top Cat,” Kaplan was well-known for his recurring role on the CBS series “Alice” as Henry Beesmeyer, a phone company employee named who often visited Mel’s Diner.

 

He also appeared in small roles in films such as “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World,” “The Great Race” and “A New Kind of Love.”

 

http://variety.com/2016/tv/news/marvin-kaplan-dead-alice-top-cat-actor-dies-89-1201844857/

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Marvin Kaplan, a character actor known for the sitcom “Alice” and his voice-over work as Choo-Choo on the animated series “Top Cat,” has died. He was 89. 

 

I believe he was one of four remaining cast members of Stanley Kramer's 1963 laugh riot, "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World." The survivors are Jerry Lewis, Carl Reiner and Barrie Chase.

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Oh, I know that guy! Seen him in a lot of movies, but never knew his name.

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For some reason, I always kind'a got Marvin Kaplan mixed up with Arnold Stang.

 

(...I dunno...maybe 'cause they both often played the same kind of "nebbish" type, and maybe 'cause they both supplied voices for the "Top Cat" show)

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For some reason, I always kind'a got Marvin Kaplan mixed up with Arnold Stang.

 

(...I dunno...maybe 'cause they both often played the same kind of "nebbish" type, and maybe 'cause they both supplied voices for the "Top Cat" show)

 

Arnold was cuter and I think he used to do commercials for Chunky-- do they still have Chunky?

 

I would have to say Marvin was the more serious actor of the two.

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Arnold was cuter and I think he used to do commercials for Chunky-- do they still have Chunky?

 

I would have to say Marvin was the more serious actor of the two.

 

OH yeah! Chunky is still around, Princess. In fact, it's probably my favorite mass-produced chocolate bar out there. Love the raisins in 'em.

 

(...and yeah...not a bad point about the differences between Marvin and Arnold here)

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For some reason, I always kind'a got Marvin Kaplan mixed up with Arnold Stang.

 

They caused problems for a lot of people

 

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They caused problems for a lot of people

 

Aah yes, Doc! I had forgotten they played the gas station attendants together in IAMMMMW, too.

 

(...good catch)

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Jack Riley, a regular actor on “The Bob Newhart Show” and the voice of Stu Pickles on the popular animated show “Rugrats,” has died. He was 80. 

 

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He died of pneumonia at a hospital in Los Angeles and is survived by his wife Ginger Lawrence, two children and two grandchildren, according to Paul Doherty at Cunningham Escott Slevin & Doherty.  Riley gained recognition for his role as the selfish and neurotic patient Elliot Carlin, who is credited in 49 episodes of “The Bob Newhart Show.”

 

Riley’s career spanned close to 50 years and he has amassed 157 credits over that duration. He was also a regular in “Diff’rent Strokes,” “Night Court” and “Son of the Beach.”

 

In addition to his career on television, Riley was a part of several Mel Brooks films including “Silent Movie,” “High Anxiety,” “History of the World: Part I” and “Spaceballs.”

 

http://variety.com/2016/tv/news/jack-riley-dead-bob-newhart-show-rugrats-dies-1201841172/

never herd of him.

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never herd of him.

 

In 1968, Jack Riley occasionally made appearances as LBJ on NBC's hit comedy series "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In." Here's s musical skit he did with Ruth Buzzi:

 

 

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This has been going through my mind but I can't place it.  There was a sitcom from, I think, the 50's that opened with "and Marvin Kaplan as Alfred".  I don't see it mentioned anywhere in print but know I heard it more than once so he did it.  That's where I first heard and saw him.  What a long career! 

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This has been going through my mind but I can't place it.  There was a sitcom from, I think, the 50's that opened with "and Marvin Kaplan as Alfred".  I don't see it mentioned anywhere in print but know I heard it more than once so he did it.  That's where I first heard and saw him.  What a long career! 

"Meet Millie"

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"Meet Millie"

 

That's what I though it might be but that's over sixty years ago.  That's what Elena Verdugo did before Marcus Welby.  Thanks a lot! 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/leslie-martinson-dead-batman-director-921817

 

Director Leslie H. Martinson, who worked on more than 100 television series during his prolific career and helmed Batman: The Movie in 27 days between the first two seasons of the wildly popular 1960s ABC show, has died. He was 101.

 

Martinson, who seemingly directed episodes of every TV program from The Roy Rogers Show in 1953 to the late 1980s syndicated comedy Small Wonder, died Saturday of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles, his family announced. 

 

Martinson also helmed several features, including the John F. Kennedy naval tale PT 109 (1963), starring Cliff Robertson, the beach comedy For Those Who Think Young (1965) and the light-hearted Raquel Welch adventure Fathom (1966).  Moving easily from genre to genre, the Boston native with the wicked New England accent put his stamp on TV Westerns (Maverick, Cheyenne, Sugarfoot), crime stories (Mannix, Ironside, 77 Sunset Strip), action (Mission: Impossible, Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionic Woman), drama (Dallas, Eight Is Enough) and comedy (The Brady Bunch, Love, American Style, Diff'rent Strokes). 

 

Martinson's credits range from some of television's most popular hits, including Fantasy Island, CHiPS, Cannon and Barnaby Jones, to such long-forgotten shows as Dusty's Trail, The Alaskans and The Chicago Teddy Bears.  It's hard to find a series that doesn't bear his name on at least one episode. 

 

"If you want to be a director, you can start studying before you're anywhere near a set," Martinson said during a 2003 interview with the Archive of American of Television. "Every time you watch a television show, you're learning your craft. You don't watch a show for entertainment, you watch to study."

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One of Martinson's most impressive achievements was shooting the 1966 feature film "Batman" between Seasons 1 and 2 of the ABC television series. The Powers That Be wanted the movie ASAP. He pulled it off in 27 days with a small budget. It opened on July 30, 1966.

 

The movie version starred Adam West as Batman and Burt Ward as Robin. It also included the TV series' most  popular Bat-Villains: Cesar Romero as The Joker, Burgess Meredith as The Penguin, Frank Gorshin as The Riddler and former Miss America Lee Meriwether as Catwoman (Julie Newmar was unavailable for the film).

 

 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/leslie-martinson-dead-batman-director-921817

 

Director Leslie H. Martinson, who worked on more than 100 television series during his prolific career and helmed Batman: The Movie in 27 days between the first two seasons of the wildly popular 1960s ABC show, has died. He was 101.

 

 

Thank you for the link so we could see what he looked like.  In his book Roger Moore said he was an emotional man who the WB actors like to needle but was always there ready to work.  While not a household name he was definitely a success in the best sense of the word.  RIP, Sir, and thanks for all the great work you've left us with.. 

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James Stacy - Actor James Stacy has died at the age of 79. After making his film debut in 1957's Sayonara, Stacy became a fixture on television, with appearances of The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet, Gunsmoke, Hazel, Highway Patrol, Perry Mason, Combat! and many others. He starred in the TV Western Lancer from 1968-1970.

 

In 1973, Stacy was involved in a terrible motorcycle accident which resulted in the amputation of Stacy's left leg and arm. After recovering, he began appearing in films and television again, including Posse (1975) and Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983).

 

In 1995 James Stacy was arrested and plead guilty to charges of child molestation, earning a six year prison sentence, and ending his career.

 

 

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