Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

946 posts in this topic

JAMES STACY sure was a good looking guy. I remember him from his TV days and seeing him on a show or two after his accident. I did not know about the molestation charges. WIKI said he also got into trouble for window peeping (or something like that) around the same time. I don't mean to seem cavalier or insensitive, but these charges were after his accident and he was able to do these things in a wheelchair with one leg and one arm? What kind of pervert was he to do this stuff in his condition?!? He must have had very dark compulsions.

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JAMES STACY sure was a good looking guy. I remember him from his TV days and seeing him on a show or two after his accident. I did not know about the molestation charges. WIKI said he also got into trouble for window peeping (or something like that) around the same time. I don't mean to seem cavalier or insensitive, but these charges were after his accident and he was able to do these things in a wheelchair with one leg and one arm? What kind of pervert was he to do this stuff in his condition?!? He must have had very dark compulsions.

I'm not making excuses for the guy but I think he had substance abuse problems stemming from his accident.

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I'm not making excuses for the guy but I think he had substance abuse problems stemming from his accident.

Thanks for your input.  You might be on to something.

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W.P. Kinsella, the author of Shoeless Joe, an award-winning novel that was adapted into the 1989 Kevin Costner film FIELD OF DREAMS, has died. He was 81 years old.

 

Kinsella had been ill for a number of years and on September 16 he ended his own life via Canada's controversial doctor assisted dying legislation. 

 

CBC News remembers Kinsella here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/wp-kinsella-assisted-death-1.3766840.

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'Liesl' from the Sound of Music, Charmian Carr, has died of complications from a rare form of dementia at the age of 73. Carr was best known for her role as the eldest Von Trapp daughter, Liesl, in the academy award winning movie, The Sound of Music. Carr was 21 at the time the movie was filmed, and is famous for singing the beloved song "I Am Sixteen Going on Seventeen." After The Sound of Music, Carr also starred opposite Anthony Perkins in the Stephen Sondheim television musical "Evening Primrose."

 

http://www.charmiancarr.com/

 

 

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Curtis Hanson - Oscar-winning writer and director Curtis Hansen has died from a heart attack at age 71. Among his many credits are The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992), The River Wild (1994), Wonder Boys (2000), 8 Mile (2002), and Too Big to Fail (2011). His greatest triumph came in 1997 with the film adaptation of James Ellroy's novel L.A. Confidential, which earned Hanson a Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar, as well as a nomination as Best Director.

 

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Bobby Breen, the celebrated boy soprano and child actor who appeared in a quick succession of popular 1930s films before puberty set in, has died. He was 88.

 

Breen died Monday of natural causes in a hospital in Pompano Beach, Fla., his daughter-in-law Jackie Howard told The Hollywood Reporter. His wife of 54 years, Audre, had died there three days earlier.

Breen's likeness is among those in the crowd pictured on the cover of the 1967 Beatles record Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Film historian Rhett Bartlett notes that there are only five survivors left from that memorable album cover — Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Bob Dylan, singer-songwriter Dion and sculptor Larry Bell.

Born in Canada on Nov. 4, 1927, Breen was pushed by his older sister to become a performer. He came to Hollywood when he was about 8 and sang on Eddie Cantor's weekly radio program.

With a reputation as "a boy Shirley Temple," the curly haired, dimpled Breen made his movie debut as an opera singer in Let's Sing Again (1936) for RKO Radio Pictures.

The youngster followed with a blitz of top-billed singing roles in such films as Rainbow on the River (1936), Make a Wish (1937) — where he is befriended by a composer played by Basil Rathbone — Hawaii Calls (1938), Way Down South (1939) and Fisherman's Wharf (1939).

However, his voice naturally changed as he became a teenager, and following production of Escape to Paradise (1939), he was done with the movies after a small role in Johnny Doughboy (1942), starring Jane Withers.

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bobby-breen-dead-soprano-singer-931949

 

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Bill Nunn - Actor Bill Nunn has died at the age of 62. Nunn made his film debut in Spike Lee's 1988 film School Daze. He followed that up with the pivotal role of Radio Raheem in Lee's incendiary, landmark 1989 film Do the Right Thing.

 

Nunn appeared in other Lee films, as well as films by other directors, including The Last Seduction (1994), Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead (1995), Kiss the Girls (1997), and as newspaper editor Robbie Robertson in all 3 Tobey Maguire-led Spider-Man films.

 

 

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Bill Nunn's most memorable moment in Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" was when the ill-fated Radio Raheem delivers a variation of Robert Mitchum's "love versus hate" exposition from "The Night of the Hunter" (1955). Instead of the knuckle tattoos sported by Mitchum's sinister preacher, Raheem wore a four-fingered ring with "Hate" on the left hand and one with "Love" on his right hand. 

 

When Lee served as a Turner Classic Movies guest programmer in July 2012, "The Night of the Hunter" was one of his four choices.

 

 

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Exploitation legend and “godfather of gore” Herschell Gordon Lewis has died aged 87. His longtime distributors Something Weird Video (named after Lewis’ 1967 feature) broke the news in a Facebook post. 

 

With his 1963 film Blood Feast, Lewis is widely credited with pioneering the splatter genre, despite it being considered “an insult even to the most puerile and salacious of audiences” in a Variety review. A later critique described it as “one of the important releases in film history, ushering in a new acceptance of explicit violence that was obviously just waiting to be exploited”. 

 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1929, Lewis studied journalism in college and became a professor of English literature at Mississippi State University. After a spell working at a radio station in Oklahoma, he joined an advertising agency in Chicago, where he made TV commercials in the 50s.

 

With producer David Friedman, Lewis embarked on a string of then-shocking features, which were made for minimal costs and found a ready audience in what would become known as the grindhouse circuit.  Initially concentrating on the “nudie-cutie” world of low-budget sex films (such as The Adventures of Lucky Pierre and Boin-n-g), Lewis made his mark with cinematic violence in the mid-60s with Blood Feast, Two Thousand Maniacs! and Color Me Blood Red.

 

Though regularly accused of technical ineptitude and outrageous taste, the films made money, and Lewis continued to push the envelope through the late 60s and early 70s. Like his contemporary Roger Corman, Lewis’ work was seen as a subversive force as the counter-culture gathered steam. 

 

However, Lewis decided to retire from film-making in the early 70s, after realising his style of low-budget horror had run its course, and returned to advertising.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/sep/26/splatter-king-herschell-gordon-lewis-dies-aged-87

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Sad to hear about H.G. Lewis, although he had a long life. Besides the titles that you've listed, I also really enjoyed 1967's Something Weird, which inspired the name of the later video and DVD company that released so many of Lewis' films.

 

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I read that Truman Capote's ashes went for sale at auction for $45,000.  I wonder if this will start a trend.

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Agnes Nixon, a celebrated creator and writer of television soap operas, who introduced uterine cancer, venereal diseases, child abuse, AIDS and other societal terrors into the weekday fantasy worlds of millions of daytime viewers, died on Wednesday in Rosemont, Pa. She was 93.

 

The cause was pneumonia resulting from Parkinson’s disease, her family said.

 

In a career that paralleled the rise, enormous popularity and gradual decline of soap operas in the last half of the 20th century, Ms. Nixon fashioned many of television’s most popular daytime shows, drawing on a rich imagination to find the great and small human dramas lurking just below the surface of American life.

 

To a 1950s audience mostly composed of women who were at home doing housework and raising children, Ms. Nixon’s early scripts for “The Guiding Light” and “Search for Tomorrow” provided an escape: a glimpse of dashing lives, handsome cads, passions run amok, dark secrets and terrible betrayals.

 

But in the 1960s and ’70s she virtually reinvented soaps, creating for the ABC network “One Life to Live,” “All My Children” and other shows infused with social relevance and politically charged topics like racism, abortion, obscenity, narcotics, the generation gap and protests against the Vietnam War.

 

Like their predecessors, the new Nixon soaps were disturbing, fascinating and addictive. Because she presented various sides of a controversy, they were more complex. But she tried to avoid preachy dialogue, letting action and plot speak for themselves. The conundrum was no longer simply whether Tara was pregnant, but whether Phil, home from Vietnam and scarred by the horrors of war, could still love her.

 

Agnes Nixon, left, the creator of “All My Children,” with Susan Lucci in a 2011 episode of the show.

 

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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/29/arts/television/agnes-nixon-who-injected-social-ills-into-soap-operas-dies-at-93.html?_r=0

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My mother and my grandmother lived for those soap operas; they loved them so much. They didn't call them soap operas at all; they called them "My Stories".

 

I got "hooked" before I went to school and afterwards it took me years

"To Kick the Habit". LOL

 

But I have a lot of respect for Agnes Nixon, not just that she was a pioneering television woman in a man's world, but also because she gave so many Locked Up and professionally frustrated Housewives something that they could identify with, which helped them get through the day and still gave them some entertainment.

 

Despite all of the mechanized, electronic household conveniences and convenience foods available in those days, a housewife's work was very hard and repetitive, and psychologically isolated --they had few non- household outlets.

 

My mother knew who Agnes Nixon was and looked up to her, like Dear Abby or Ann Landers-- as a woman who understood what other women were going through and had been successful in a hostile male environment.

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I've wondered if the role played by Doris Belack in TOOTSIE was based in part on Agnes Nixon?

 

Belack herself was primarily a soap opera actress playing parts in a large number of series and appeared in at least a few of Nixon's programs.

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I've wondered if the role played by Doris Belack in TOOTSIE was based in part on Agnes Nixon?

 

Belack herself was primarily a soap opera actress playing parts in a large number of series and appeared in at least a few of Nixon's programs.

 

That's a safe bet, although there always have been powerful women running daytime dramas. Nixon previously worked for Irna Phillips, who created "Guiding Light," "As the World Turns" and "Another World." When "Tootsie" was released in 1982, the most popular soap was "General Hospital," produced by the creative showrunner Gloria Monty.

 

 

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Belack as TV producer Rita Marshall in "Tootsie"

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That's a safe bet, although there always have been powerful women running daytime dramas. Nixon previously worked for Irna Phillips, who created "Guiding Light," "As the World Turns" and "Another World." When "Tootsie" was released in 1982, the most popular soap was "General Hospital," produced by the creative showrunner Gloria Monty.

 

 

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Belack as TV producer Rita Marshall in "Tootsie"

the wife says she watched belack on soaps.

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Doris Belack  was also one of the judges on the Law & Order shows as was Arthur Miller's sister, Joan Copeland, one of the great soap villains of all time.  In fact so many soap actors appeared on those programs that it became a game to see who would show up on the next episode.  Blue Bloods, being a New York show, seems to have taken up the mantle as all the current soaps come out of California.

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Oscar Brand, the lanky, affable, gravelly-voiced folk singer and songwriter whose weekly on-air hootenanny was the longest-running radio show in history with a single host, died on Friday at his home in Great Neck, N.Y. He was 96.
 
Doug Yeager, Mr. Brand’s personal manager, said the cause was pneumonia.
 
In addition to performing and recording prolifically, Mr. Brand wrote books, articles and the scores for Broadway musicals and documentary films. He also hosted television shows. But it was his radio show, “Folksong Festival,” for which he was best known.
 
Every week for more than 70 years, with the easy, familiar voice of a friend, Mr. Brand invited listeners of the New York public radio station WNYC to his quirky, informal combination of American music symposium, barn dance, cracker-barrel conversation, songwriting session and verbal horseplay. Mr. Brand’s last show aired on Sept. 24, Mr. Yeager said.
 
Everyone who was anyone in folk music dropped by. Woody Guthrie — Woodrow Wilson Guthrie, as Mr. Brand called his rambling friend — was known to burst in unexpectedly to try out a new song. Bob Dylan told a riveting tale about his boyhood in a carnival, not a word of it true.
 
The music roamed hither and yon, and back again — from fiddlers to folk songs of the Appalachians to ethnic songs of the big cities. In the 1940s Mr. Brand played what were then known as “race records” by the likes of Memphis Minnie and Tampa Red, precursors of rhythm and blues and rock ’n’ roll.
 
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He scored ballets for Agnes de Mille and commercials for Log Cabin Syrup and Cheerios. He wrote music for documentary films, published songbooks and hosted the children’s television shows “The First Look” and “Spirit of ’76” as well as, from 1963 to 1967, the Canadian television series “Let’s Sing Out.”
 
He also wrote, with Paul Nassau, the music and lyrics for two shows that made it to Broadway, although neither had a long run: “A Joyful Noise” (1966) and “The Education of H*Y*M*A*N K*A*P*L*A*N (1968), based on stories by Leo Rosten. He was curator of the Songwriters Hall of Fame and served on the advisory panel that helped develop “Sesame Street.”

 

Mr. Brand appeared as himself in the 1965 film “Once Upon a Coffee House,” also known as “Hootenany a Go-Go."

 

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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/02/arts/music/oscar-brand-folk-singer-whose-radio-show-twanged-for-decades-dies-at-96.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

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Pierre Etaix - French filmmaker, actor, comedian, clown Pierre Etaix has died at the age of 87. He directed films from the early 1960's through the late 1980's, as well as appearing in the films of others, including Mon Oncle (1956), Pickpocket (1959), and even Jerry Lewis' infamously unreleased The Day the Clown Cried (1972). Etaix's own films were entangled in rights issues for many years, keeping them out of the view of American audiences until recently, when Criterion released a box set of his works, including The Suitor (1963), Yoyo (1965), As Long As You've Got Your Health (1966), Le Grand Amour (1969), and Land of Milk and Honey (1971).

 

 

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John Vulich - Gifted make-up artist John Vulich has died at the age 55. He started out working as part of the make-up teams of such notables as Tom Savini (Day of the Dead) and Greg Cannom (The Lost Boys). Vulich really hit his stride with his work in television, bringing high-quality, cinema-level make up and creature effects to the small screen. His work on Babylon 5, The X-Files, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Angel is particularly noteworthy. He won 3 Emmys, and was nominated for 5 more for his work.

 

 

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I have belatedly learned of the death of director Norman Abbott this past July.

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/norman-abbott-dead-tv-director-910541

 

Norman Abbott, a nephew of famed comedian Bud Abbott who directed multiple episodes of such beloved TV sitcoms as Leave It to Beaver, Welcome Back, Kotter, The Munsters and Sanford & Son, has died. He was 93.

 

Abbott, the brainchild behind the Broadway sensation Sugar Babies, the comeback vehicle for Mickey Rooney in the late 1970s, died Saturday in Valencia, Calif., according to Richard Lertzman, co-author of the 2015 book The Life and Times of Mickey Rooney.

 

Abbott helmed 38 episodes and produced 22 of The Jack Benny Program and directed 43 installments of Leave It to Beaver and 23 of Welcome Back, Kotter. He also guided such series as The George Gobel Show, I'm Dickens, He's Fenster, Bachelor Father, Get Smart, The Brady Bunch, McHale’s Navy, Adam-12, Love, American Style and Alice. Abbott directed and provided the story for the quirky film The Last of the Secret Agents? (1966), starring the comedy team of Marty Allen and Steve Rossi.

 

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I will always remember him for "Classification Dead",  Get Smart's classic spoof of DOA. In one scene the poisoned Maxwell Smart, desperate to find an antidote, leaves the office of a "Dr. Abbott Norman".

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Ted V. Mikels - Sad news in the world of B-movie fandom as Ted "T.V." Mikels has died at the age of 87. After working on the periphery of Hollywood as a stuntman, horse wrangler, and archery tutor, he decided to try making his own films starting with 1963's Strike Me Deadly. His films were low-budget affairs, with exploitation titles like Dr. Sex (1964), One Shocking Moment (1965) and The Black Klansman (1966). Many of his films are considered cult items, "so-bad-they're-good", or were featured on Mystery Science Theater 3000. These titles include Girl In Gold Boots (1968), The Corpse Grinders (1971), The Doll Squad (1973), and his most (in)famous film, 1968's The Astro-Zombies. These films helped rank him among the greats of bad-movie maestros, with Ed Wood, Al Adamson, H.G. Lewis, Ray Dennis Steckler, and Larry Buchanan.

 

 

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I don't really know much about Ted V. Mikels. I was unaware he was connected to The Black Klansman. Not too long ago I heard that film's "classic" theme song.

 

I did know Wayne Rogers was the co-producer and writer of the Astro Zombies. That poster is awesome. Looks like a high school comic books nerd drew it.

 

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